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Bogey:

--- Quote from: Henk on July 23, 2015, 12:15:46 PM ---This is a great live recording by them:



--- End quote ---

Great music on that one,Brian.

XB-70 Valkyrie:
Just took delivery of this fine disq. Not entirely sure this qualifies as jazz, but it certainly kicks ass. (I heard it on KCSM's All Out in any case.) Some very interesting percussion with a range of other instrumentalists in small ensembles. A range of influences here from jazz to rock to techno/electronica...

Bogey:


30 tracks from 1963.

Here is a review

A two-CD set, with the band in great form drawing on material from all eras. There are full performances of "Suite Thursday" - much livelier than the studio take, and improved by an extended Nance violin solo on "Lay-By" - and "Tone Parallel To Harlem," in addition to the usual parade of hits ("Rockin' In Rhythm," a rearranged "Perdido"), new material ("Theme From The Asphalt Jungle") and some offbeat oldies ("Rose Of The Rio Grande"). Cootie Williams had just rejoined the band after a twenty-year absence, so "Concerto For Cootie" is back, paired with the new "Tootie For Cootie," and the set ends with "Echoes Of Harlem." Hodges is as tender as ever on his features "On The Sunny Side Of The Street" and "The Star-Crossed Lovers." Strayhorn's bombastic "The Eighth Veil" is one of the stranger tunes here; Gonsalves's feature "Cop-Out," on the other hand, sounds like any big band you'd hear on a 50s film soundtrack. Oh, and if you want to study the distinct approaches of the various soloists, this is a great place to start, because Duke calls out the name of the featured player at the end of each tune (even each solo on the everybody-blows-a-chorus "Jam With Sam"). (DBW)

I continue to be drawn to Duke's music and enjoy the later efforts as much as the earlier ones.  And being a live/concert recording junkie, this was just too much to pass up. 

Brian:

--- Quote from: Bogey on August 09, 2015, 05:07:01 AM ---

30 tracks from 1963.

Here is a review

A two-CD set, with the band in great form drawing on material from all eras. There are full performances of "Suite Thursday" - much livelier than the studio take, and improved by an extended Nance violin solo on "Lay-By" - and "Tone Parallel To Harlem," in addition to the usual parade of hits ("Rockin' In Rhythm," a rearranged "Perdido"), new material ("Theme From The Asphalt Jungle") and some offbeat oldies ("Rose Of The Rio Grande"). Cootie Williams had just rejoined the band after a twenty-year absence, so "Concerto For Cootie" is back, paired with the new "Tootie For Cootie," and the set ends with "Echoes Of Harlem." Hodges is as tender as ever on his features "On The Sunny Side Of The Street" and "The Star-Crossed Lovers." Strayhorn's bombastic "The Eighth Veil" is one of the stranger tunes here; Gonsalves's feature "Cop-Out," on the other hand, sounds like any big band you'd hear on a 50s film soundtrack. Oh, and if you want to study the distinct approaches of the various soloists, this is a great place to start, because Duke calls out the name of the featured player at the end of each tune (even each solo on the everybody-blows-a-chorus "Jam With Sam"). (DBW)

I continue to be drawn to Duke's music and enjoy the later efforts as much as the earlier ones.  And being a live/concert recording junkie, this was just too much to pass up.

--- End quote ---
Oh man, please report back when you hear this. As another late Duke fan and live/concert junkie, I'm very excited by that description.

Wakefield:
This is the first jazz album that I have purchased in my whole life:  ???

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