What Jazz are you listening to now?

Started by Gurn Blanston, June 12, 2015, 06:16:31 AM

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Mirror Image

Quote from: Dry Brett Kavanaugh on June 20, 2024, 09:04:17 AMThe quintet with Wayne Shorter et al.!

Yeah, I'm probably with you there. Everyone raves about his albums with Coltrane, but, honestly, I never cared much for Coltrane. Wayne Shorter, on the other hand, was remarkable. One of my favorite saxophonists and his own compositions were so good.
"You cannot set art off in a corner and hope for it to have vitality, reality, and substance." ― Charles Ives

AnotherSpin

Quote from: Mirror Image on June 21, 2024, 07:46:12 PMYeah, I'm probably with you there. Everyone raves about his albums with Coltrane, but, honestly, I never cared much for Coltrane. Wayne Shorter, on the other hand, was remarkable. One of my favorite saxophonists and his own compositions were so good.

Kind of Blue is an unrivalled album, not only in the discography of Miles Davis, but in all of jazz. One of the very best in the whole genre of improvisational music. Always liked 'Round Midnight as well. Milestones maybe a little less so. With all that said, I don't see the point in contrasting the two periods, both are good in their own way.

I love Coltrane's music too. The compositions of his last years are often too overwhelming and too difficult to digest in large doses, but there's nothing to be done about it, things evolved in a direction no one could keep in control.

Mirror Image

Quote from: AnotherSpin on June 21, 2024, 08:28:53 PMKind of Blue is an unrivalled album, not only in the discography of Miles Davis, but in all of jazz. One of the very best in the whole genre of improvisational music. Always liked 'Round Midnight as well. Milestones maybe a little less so. With all that said, I don't see the point in contrasting the two periods, both are good in their own way.

I love Coltrane's music too. The compositions of his last years are often too overwhelming and too difficult to digest in large doses, but there's nothing to be done about it, things evolved in a direction no one could keep in control.

I think Coltrane actually was better when he was on his own and, especially that quartet with McCoy, Jimmy Garrison and Elvin. His albums Blue Train, Crescent, Ballads and A Love Supreme being particular favorites. I don't care for his later free jazz explorations. I really got off the train after A Love Supreme.

As for Kind of Blue, sure, it's a great album, but it never has been a personal favorite of mine. I actually prefer Seven Steps to Heaven (one of my 'Top 5' favorite Miles albums) for example, but my real sweet spot for Miles is the Second Great Quintet, especially the albums Miles Smiles and Sorcerer, which have both had a profound impact on me not only as a listener, but a musician as well.
"You cannot set art off in a corner and hope for it to have vitality, reality, and substance." ― Charles Ives

AnotherSpin

Quote from: Mirror Image on June 22, 2024, 06:51:55 PMI think Coltrane actually was better when he was on his own and, especially that quartet with McCoy, Jimmy Garrison and Elvin. His albums Blue Train, Crescent, Ballads and A Love Supreme being particular favorites. I don't care for his later free jazz explorations. I really got off the train after A Love Supreme.

As for Kind of Blue, sure, it's a great album, but it never has been a personal favorite of mine. I actually prefer Seven Steps to Heaven (one of my 'Top 5' favorite Miles albums) for example, but my real sweet spot for Miles is the Second Great Quintet, especially the albums Miles Smiles and Sorcerer, which have both had a profound impact on me not only as a listener, but a musician as well.

I'm not a musician, so maybe I hear differently, but basically our preferences coincide. Seven Steps to Heaven is a nice album, but I'm closer to the following ones, like Sorcerer or Nefertiti.

Dry Brett Kavanaugh

So Long Eric - Mingus. Great playing by Jaki Byard/Piano and Dannie Richmond/Drums.




ando


Duke Ellington The Duke's Men: Small Groups Vol. 1 (1991, Columbia)

Legit classics always pick you up.  ;D

Dry Brett Kavanaugh

Prince of Darkness, comp. Wayne Shorter.



AnotherSpin

Arguably one of John Coltrane's best, if not his best album. Either way, it's a wonderful sample of a great artist in his best years with his finest combo including McCoy Tyner, Elvin Jones and Jimmy Garrison.


ando


Geri Allen Trio Feed the Fire (1996, Storyville)
Nice track from their Some Aspects of Water lp.

Henk

Quote from: AnotherSpin on July 01, 2024, 03:10:10 AMArguably one of John Coltrane's best, if not his best album. Either way, it's a wonderful sample of a great artist in his best years with his finest combo including McCoy Tyner, Elvin Jones and Jimmy Garrison.



He often plays too loud. That's why Miles recommended him a soprano sax. Will relisten to this album.

AnotherSpin

Quote from: Henk on July 02, 2024, 06:43:08 AMHe often plays too loud. That's why Miles recommended him a soprano sax. Will relisten to this album.

Baffling remark, it never occurred to me that Coltrane played too loud. I guess it depends on who you compare him to. If to Stan Getz or Art Pepper, then maybe. If you compare him to  Peter Brötzmann or Charles Gayle, maybe not at all ;)

Henk

Quote from: AnotherSpin on July 02, 2024, 08:48:57 AMBaffling remark, it never occurred to me that Coltrane played too loud. I guess it depends on who you compare him to. If to Stan Getz or Art Pepper, then maybe. If you compare him to  Peter Brötzmann or Charles Gayle, maybe not at all ;)

I'm spinning 'Coltrane' now. This is indeed a good recording. I think Brötzmann is inspired by Coltrane. I don't like the loud playing so much.

AnotherSpin

Quote from: Henk on July 02, 2024, 09:10:27 AMI'm spinning 'Coltrane' now. This is indeed a good recording. I think Brötzmann is inspired by Coltrane. I don't like the loud playing so much.

Many contemporary saxophonists are inspired by Coltrane. Those in the avant-garde, almost all of them.

Henk

Quote from: AnotherSpin on July 02, 2024, 10:46:12 AMMany contemporary saxophonists are inspired by Coltrane. Those in the avant-garde, almost all of them.

Don't forget Ayler.

KevinP

Quote from: AnotherSpin on July 02, 2024, 08:48:57 AMBaffling remark, it never occurred to me that Coltrane played too loud. I guess it depends on who you compare him to. If to Stan Getz or Art Pepper, then maybe. If you compare him to  Peter Brötzmann or Charles Gayle, maybe not at all ;)

I think maybe he played too loud if you were there with him, but the producer and/or engineers toned him down so the loudness isn't obvious to us.

brewski

Ella Fitzgerald: Live at Montreux 1969. Kind of amazing to have this glimpse into the past, in such high quality. Video is a little fuzzy — of its time — but the audio is excellent. Her superb collaborators are Tommy Flanagan (piano), Frank de la Rosa (bass), and Ed Thigpen (drums).


-Bruce
"I set down a beautiful chord on paper—and suddenly it rusts."
—Alfred Schnittke (1934-1998)

Dry Brett Kavanaugh

Quote from: brewski on July 05, 2024, 04:29:13 AMElla Fitzgerald: Live at Montreux 1969. Kind of amazing to have this glimpse into the past, in such high quality. Video is a little fuzzy — of its time — but the audio is excellent. Her superb collaborators are Tommy Flanagan (piano), Frank de la Rosa (bass), and Ed Thigpen (drums).


-Bruce


Nice! Thigpen is a great drummer!

ando


Day 1 live stream of the 2024 Montreux Jazz Fest. I imagine that they'll continue streaming through the weekend. The Batiste w/Trombone Shorty set's been a nice opener.



brewski

Quote from: ando on July 05, 2024, 01:29:50 PM

Day 1 live stream of the 2024 Montreux Jazz Fest. I imagine that they'll continue streaming through the weekend. The Batiste w/Trombone Shorty set's been a nice opener.




Thank you ever so much for posting this. My post of Ella at Montreux was completely coincidental; I did not realize that the 2024 festival was even happening!

I love Jon Batiste and Trombone Shorty, so will certainly watch that, as well as some of the upcoming acts, e.g.,...Kraftwerk! (Not sure they really count as "jazz," but who cares.  ;D )

-Bruce
"I set down a beautiful chord on paper—and suddenly it rusts."
—Alfred Schnittke (1934-1998)

AnotherSpin

Quote from: ando on July 05, 2024, 01:29:50 PM

Day 1 live stream of the 2024 Montreux Jazz Fest. I imagine that they'll continue streaming through the weekend. The Batiste w/Trombone Shorty set's been a nice opener.




Alice Cooper? Duran Duran? Lenny Kravitz? What could be more convincing in confirming the thesis that jazz is dead than the list of participants of the once famous jazz festival?