I listen to Death Metal. I'd like to listen to classical, too. Where do I start?

Started by MilesMetal, September 09, 2015, 02:39:01 AM

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jochanaan

Welcome!  As a metal listener, you might enjoy some of the more extreme late-Romantic and contemporary-classical music.  Try the music of Edgard Varese, especially Ionisation, Hyperprism, and Poeme Electronique; also the Mahler symphonies and Stravinsky's Rite of Spring.  And Wagner has already been mentioned. 8)

Since you already like Bach's Toccata and Fugue in d minor, you might explore some of Bach's other organ music.  There's lots of it, and it's all great. ;D

But, as has been said, there is an inexhaustible mine of great stuff. 8) Some names to highlight, in approximately chronological order:

Medieval period: Machaut, Ockeghem
Renaissance: Josquin, Palestrina
Baroque: Monteverdi, Corelli, Vivaldi, J.S. Bach, Handel
Classical period: C.P.E. Bach, Haydn, Mozart
Transitional: Beethoven
Romantic: Berlioz, Schumann, Wagner, Brahms, Tchaikovsky, Mahler
Contemporary: Schoenberg, Stravinsky, Varese, Shostakovich, Gorecki, Elliott Carter

(Of necessity, I've left out many fine composers to emphasize these "high lights.")
Imagination + discipline = creativity

OrchestralNut

Quote from: MilesMetal on September 09, 2015, 08:14:23 AM
That's a fair point. I'm not sure how far into it I will go, although I am interested enough to not only listen to the music but also learn about it in general. Getting to know it's history, context, influence and legacy will make it easier to understand exactly what I'm hearing. I know for sure that I won't be blown away on every first listen. With also music I know it takes time to appreciate these things. It was the same when I was originally getting into death metal.

Miles, I had this great book that I referenced many, many times when I first started exploring classical music about 10 years ago.  I think it is a fantastic resource and fun read!  It is certainly not definitive, but based on the author's own experience of discovering classical music.

[asin]0449910423[/asin]

mc ukrneal

Quote from: Sergeant Rock on September 09, 2015, 06:25:02 AM
CD 54 Bruckner: Symphony No.4 in E Flat Major - "Romantic"; Psalm 150, for Soprano, Chorus And Orchestra

Sarge
Shoot - gonna have to eat more carrots! Or get stronger glasses!  :)
Be kind to your fellow posters!!

MilesMetal

Quote from: sanantonio on September 09, 2015, 08:19:42 AM
I'd be interested in some Death Metal recommendations.

;)

That DG box would be a great (although expensive) place to start.

If you're sure :)

Some of the classics of the genre come from the mid eighties to early nineties.

Altars of Madness and Blessed are the Sick by Morbid Angel were supposedly influenced by classical music, though I'm not sure how true that statement is.

Another classic would be Leprosy by Death, though their later works (Human, Symbolic and The Sound of Perseverance) would be more 'listenable' for fans of classical music.

Left Hand Path by Entombed is another album that is hailed as one of the best death metal albums. The same can be said of Severed Survival and Critical Madness by Autopsy.

MilesMetal

Quote from: Brewski on September 09, 2015, 08:21:55 AM
I agree with comments from others: for 100 CDs - assuming the price is right - that's not a bad start at all. There's plenty there to help you decide what you might go for.

However, that said, you might want to supplement the set with more works by living composers, some of whom have been influenced by other types of music, including metal. Here's the SoundCloud link to Mario Diaz de Leon, a composer who used to play guitar in punk rock bands, then went to Oberlin, and later received his doctorate in composition at Columbia University. Earlier this year I heard Luciform played by the International Contemporary Ensemble (ICE), quite interesting.

https://soundcloud.com/mariodiazdeleon

Oh and sorry, forgot the most important part: welcome!  8)

--Bruce

Thanks for the recommendations.

You're right about listening to modern composers. I'd like to understand how this type of music developed so contemporary composers would be an essential part of that.

MilesMetal

Quote from: jochanaan on September 09, 2015, 08:35:05 AM
Welcome!  As a metal listener, you might enjoy some of the more extreme late-Romantic and contemporary-classical music.  Try the music of Edgard Varese, especially Ionisation, Hyperprism, and Poeme Electronique; also the Mahler symphonies and Stravinsky's Rite of Spring.  And Wagner has already been mentioned. 8)

Since you already like Bach's Toccata and Fugue in d minor, you might explore some of Bach's other organ music.  There's lots of it, and it's all great. ;D

But, as has been said, there is an inexhaustible mine of great stuff. 8) Some names to highlight, in approximately chronological order:

Medieval period: Machaut, Ockeghem
Renaissance: Josquin, Palestrina
Baroque: Monteverdi, Corelli, Vivaldi, J.S. Bach, Handel
Classical period: C.P.E. Bach, Haydn, Mozart
Transitional: Beethoven
Romantic: Berlioz, Schumann, Wagner, Brahms, Tchaikovsky, Mahler
Contemporary: Schoenberg, Stravinsky, Varese, Shostakovich, Gorecki, Elliott Carter

(Of necessity, I've left out many fine composers to emphasize these "high lights.")

Thank you for the reply. I will be listening to Rite of Spring next. I've had the recommendation a few times now.

I'm now beginning to understand how much great classical music is out there. It's rather overwhelming. I think I'll be sticking around on this forum for some time for some assitance.

MilesMetal

Quote from: ChamberNut on September 09, 2015, 08:50:10 AM
Miles, I had this great book that I referenced many, many times when I first started exploring classical music about 10 years ago.  I think it is a fantastic resource and fun read!  It is certainly not definitive, but based on the author's own experience of discovering classical music.

That does look like a good resource, thank you. It's cheap on Amazon so I'll definitely pick it up. Thank you.

San Antone

Quote from: MilesMetal on September 09, 2015, 10:43:05 AM
If you're sure :)

Some of the classics of the genre come from the mid eighties to early nineties.

Altars of Madness and Blessed are the Sick by Morbid Angel were supposedly influenced by classical music, though I'm not sure how true that statement is.

Another classic would be Leprosy by Death, though their later works (Human, Symbolic and The Sound of Perseverance) would be more 'listenable' for fans of classical music.

Left Hand Path by Entombed is another album that is hailed as one of the best death metal albums. The same can be said of Severed Survival and Critical Madness by Autopsy.

Thanks.  I am pretty eclectic in my tastes and can find something to enjoy with most genres.. 

Ken B

Welcome Miles. That sort of collection looks like a good start. There's a huge amount of music, and a lot of good places to start. You seem to be doing okay on your own!

Dax

There are lots of avenues to be sure: Toccata and Fugue in D minor might point you in the direction of more Bach, more organ music or more fugues. The Rite of Spring might lead towards more Stravinsky, or . . . Antheil's Ballet mécanique or Varese . . .  Go where your temptations take you rather than trying to cover the history of music. Having said that, if you want core 20th century works, the Rite is a great place to start.

Mirror Image

You like death metal? Just listen to Shostakovich or Schnittke and all will be well in the world. 0:)
"Humility is society's greatest misconception."

My "Top 5" Favorite Composers: Debussy, Mahler, Strauss, Sibelius and Bartók


(poco) Sforzando

It is a surprisingly strong anthology of its kind, and reasonably priced. Despite the well-meaning suggestions of others here, I think it offers you months of discovery without your needing to supplement it with additional books and discs for the time being. My advice is a little different: pick a disc or two at random, especially if it's music you've never heard of, and work your way through the collection until you've covered everything. What I like about the collection is that it does cover most of the major genres, composers, and historical movements without dumbing-down the selections to the kind of "music appreciation" racket that cowers from presenting anything too challenging. Of course there are works I'd want to see (why no Beethoven quartets?) but the sheer percentage of good stuff makes this undoubtedly the best collection of its kind I've ever encountered. 
"I don't know what sforzando means, though it clearly means something."

mc ukrneal

Quote from: (poco) Sforzando on September 09, 2015, 04:43:37 PM
It is a surprisingly strong anthology of its kind, and reasonably priced. Despite the well-meaning suggestions of others here, I think it offers you months of discovery without your needing to supplement it with additional books and discs for the time being. My advice is a little different: pick a disc or two at random, especially if it's music you've never heard of, and work your way through the collection until you've covered everything. What I like about the collection is that it does cover most of the major genres, composers, and historical movements without dumbing-down the selections to the kind of "music appreciation" racket that cowers from presenting anything too challenging. Of course there are works I'd want to see (why no Beethoven quartets?) but the sheer percentage of good stuff makes this undoubtedly the best collection of its kind I've ever encountered. 
Actually, Disc 32 does have a Beethoven quartet - just not listed here...
Be kind to your fellow posters!!

Ken B

Quote from: (poco) Sforzando on September 09, 2015, 04:43:37 PM
It is a surprisingly strong anthology of its kind, and reasonably priced. Despite the well-meaning suggestions of others here, I think it offers you months of discovery without your needing to supplement it with additional books and discs for the time being. My advice is a little different: pick a disc or two at random, especially if it's music you've never heard of, and work your way through the collection until you've covered everything. What I like about the collection is that it does cover most of the major genres, composers, and historical movements without dumbing-down the selections to the kind of "music appreciation" racket that cowers from presenting anything too challenging. Of course there are works I'd want to see (why no Beethoven quartets?) but the sheer percentage of good stuff makes this undoubtedly the best collection of its kind I've ever encountered.

Indeed. Wish I had had it when I was starting.

There's a lot to be said for just random listening to see what strikes you.

TheGSMoeller


(poco) Sforzando

Quote from: mc ukrneal on September 09, 2015, 05:36:14 PM
Actually, Disc 32 does have a Beethoven quartet - just not listed here...

So it does. Op. 59/1. Can't do better than that. For a more detailed listing of tracks and artists:
http://www.deutschegrammophon.com/en/cat/4791048
"I don't know what sforzando means, though it clearly means something."

Jo498

Yes, it is better than many other similar collections (but with 100 discs it is also easier to cover essential things). As to be expected the focus is more on orchestral music. One blatant gap is Baroque opera where they only have Purcell's Dido (a great, but rather atypical piece). One of the Handel discs should have been highlights from Alcina or Julius Caesar instead of not so important orchestral music, and they could also have included highlights from Monteverdi's Orfeo instead of Renaissance dance music.
But this is probably not music someone coming from Death metal will miss during the first 100 encounters with classical ;)
Tout le malheur des hommes vient d'une seule chose, qui est de ne savoir pas demeurer en repos, dans une chambre.
- Blaise Pascal

MilesMetal

Quote from: Ken B on September 09, 2015, 01:53:02 PM
Welcome Miles. That sort of collection looks like a good start. There's a huge amount of music, and a lot of good places to start. You seem to be doing okay on your own!

That's good to hear. :)

MilesMetal

Quote from: Dax on September 09, 2015, 02:47:05 PM
There are lots of avenues to be sure: Toccata and Fugue in D minor might point you in the direction of more Bach, more organ music or more fugues. The Rite of Spring might lead towards more Stravinsky, or . . . Antheil's Ballet mécanique or Varese . . .  Go where your temptations take you rather than trying to cover the history of music. Having said that, if you want core 20th century works, the Rite is a great place to start.

Bach, along with Stravinsky, is high on my priority. I've found that I really enjoy the sound of to pipe organ.

k a rl h e nn i ng

Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot