What are you playing?

Started by Maciek, April 13, 2007, 03:44:13 AM

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madaboutmahler

Quote from: Lisztianwagner on May 15, 2013, 07:52:45 AM
Thank you, Daniel!

That's great, Elgar's Dream of Gerontius is definitely a stunning work, congratulations! :)
How nice, I haven't listened to Copland's Fanfare yet, but The Planets and Shosty No.5 are masterpieces, it is enough not to make those concerts be missed! Are you going to play in the percussion section again? :) I love playing the glockenspiel or the xylophone in the Holst.

Sounds an amazing project, good luck! :)

Thank you, Ilaria!
Yes, I'm in the percussion section at youth orchestra. At the moment it's just me and one other so we get to multitask the whole section ourselves! But for the concerts, I'll be on second timpani for the Planets and Tam Tam for the Copland, and then xylophone/glockenspiel/bass drum for the Shosty. So excited! :)
"Music is ... A higher revelation than all Wisdom & Philosophy"
— Ludwig van Beethoven

deafeninglysilent_1.61...

I have begun, as of a month ago, learning Messiaen's Vingt Regards sur l'Enfant-Jésus in its entirety. I am learning two movements at a time, one from each of two lists of ten of the twenty pieces: the first list is of the ten hardest pieces of the set, the hardest first; the second list is of the remaining pieces in chronological order, from the beginning to the end of the piece. This was after I learned and performed his Oiseaux exotiques (the piano solo) and his Livre du Saint-Sacrement (for organ) over the last several years. I play music of many other composers, mainly modern classical, but I also play traditional music, especially Bach and Schubert.
avatar photo of Stockhausen from Inori lecture taken by Kathinka Pasveer in 2005

"All sounds can make meaningful language." - Karlheinz Stockhausen

North Star

Quote from: deafeninglysilent_1.61... on July 20, 2013, 05:25:59 PM
I have begun, as of a month ago, learning Messiaen's Vingt Regards sur l'Enfant-Jésus in its entirety. I am learning two movements at a time, one from each of two lists of ten of the twenty pieces: the first list is of the ten hardest pieces of the set, the hardest first; the second list is of the remaining pieces in chronological order, from the beginning to the end of the piece. This was after I learned and performed his Oiseaux exotiques (the piano solo) and his Livre du Saint-Sacrement (for organ) over the last several years. I play music of many other composers, mainly modern classical, but I also play traditional music, especially Bach and Schubert.
Welcome to the forum! You must be quite good if you can play Vingt!
"Everything has beauty, but not everyone sees it." - Confucius

My photographs on Flickr

deafeninglysilent_1.61...

Quote from: North Star on July 21, 2013, 03:24:53 AM
Welcome to the forum! You must be quite good if you can play Vingt!

Thank you very much! I look forward to being a part of it.
avatar photo of Stockhausen from Inori lecture taken by Kathinka Pasveer in 2005

"All sounds can make meaningful language." - Karlheinz Stockhausen

k a rl h e nn i ng

And for your fellow New Englanders, let us know when you go public with Les regards!
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

deafeninglysilent_1.61...

Quote from: karlhenning on July 21, 2013, 01:20:34 PM
And for your fellow New Englanders, let us know when you go public with Les regards!

Of course!  ;)
avatar photo of Stockhausen from Inori lecture taken by Kathinka Pasveer in 2005

"All sounds can make meaningful language." - Karlheinz Stockhausen

PaulR

In Orchestra:  Tchaik 4, Haydn Trumpet Concerto, and Beethoven's Creatures of the  Prometheus Overture.

Solo:  Still Schubert's Arpeggione Sonata

jochanaan

Tonight I practiced Bach's Partita in a minor for solo flute.  That's a great piece to play when I'm busking (when it's considerably warmer in Denver than now!) since it requires no accompaniment--but it's a tough piece!  I constantly need to brush up on some of the harder passages...
Imagination + discipline = creativity

Lisztianwagner

Started studying:

Claude Debussy
Clair de lune


Of course, for piano.
"Tradition is not the worship of ashes, but the preservation of fire." - Gustav Mahler

ComposerOfAvantGarde

Shard by Elliott Carter. Last page is still a bitch to play and I have to play it in my final exam this year, Saturday week. :(

I love the piece though, and it's so fun to play! I hope I do well...

EigenUser

I've actually been pretty productive on piano. Usually I have a bad habit of never finishing anything I ever start trying to learn, but I learned Berg's Sonata, op. 1 over the summer and I am currently working on Scriabin's Sonata No. 9 "Black Mass" (>:D). I thought that it would be too hard, but I've gotten to the point where I can actually play it cover-to-cover (still needs a lot of work, but I'm surprised I managed). Granted, it is one of his easier sonatas.

I managed to get a decent video of the Berg a few months ago (note that "decent" for me is far from what most of you think of as "decent" -- if I were to publish a recording of it and sell it on Amazon, you guys wouldn't want it,  :laugh:):

https://www.youtube.com/v/moryDZAX18Y
Beethoven's Op. 133 -- A fugue so bad that even Beethoven himself called it "Grosse".

amw

I periodically record myself sightreading various music, presumably in an effort to get myself to eventually start practicing. (Maybe 2017 will be the year I actually make some progress!)

Does it ever happen to other people that you're playing a piece and then find out your tempi are actually pretty far outside the mainstream?? I found this out tonight whilst reviewing my sightread through Schumann's Humoreske from a few weeks ago.

I Einfach/Sehr rasch und leicht - 6:52
II Hastig (Innere Stimme) - 5:22
III Einfach und zart/Intermezzo - 4:39
IV Innig - 2:39
V Sehr lebhaft - 2:23 [ok this one I was deliberately playing slower because it's hard]
VI Mit einigem Pomp - 1:41
VII Zum Schluß - 7:42

[Whereas the timings from Radu Lupu, ordinarily considered a reference recording: 5:25, 4:04, 4:30, 2:41, 1:41, 1:36, 5:59]

If I ever end up learning this piece I suspect I'll have to speed up movements 1 and 7 in particular to prevent listeners from becoming bored to tears :P

TMHeimer

#332
I'm slated for a clarinet solo in Aug. with the Westchester Band in N.Y.  Not sure what yet--possibly Debussy Rhapsodie, Messager "Solo de Concours", Spohr's 1st or 3rd Concerto, the Daniel Wolff piece for clarinet & Band. Depends on which our conductor can dig up.
Modified March 24-- IF there are any concerts in NY at all by then.....
The Most Advanced Clarinet Book
tomheimer.ampbk.com/
austinmacauley.com/author/heimer-tom
(click on book image, PDF samples)
Boreal Ballad for unaccompanied clarinet solo
(Sheet Music Plus)

BWV 1080

Been playing at jazz during the pandemic, working up some arrangements.  Here one I did of St. Louis Blues

https://www.youtube.com/v/aQ6A96_MASo

Piano1


Mirror Image

Quote from: BWV 1080 on January 13, 2021, 01:56:32 PM
Been playing at jazz during the pandemic, working up some arrangements.  Here one I did of St. Louis Blues

https://www.youtube.com/v/aQ6A96_MASo

Nice job! You've got a great tone and touch on the guitar.
"Humility is society's greatest misconception."

My "Top 5" Favorite Composers: Debussy, Mahler, Strauss, Sibelius and Bartók