Author Topic: Hilding Rosenberg  (Read 26704 times)

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Online vandermolen

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Re: Hilding Rosenberg
« Reply #80 on: July 23, 2013, 05:31:26 AM »
I am intrigued. I shall do so as soon as I am in front of a (non-work) pc ... thank you  :o

It's in 'The Diner' section - currently second page in. :)
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline pencils

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Re: Hilding Rosenberg
« Reply #81 on: July 23, 2013, 07:04:29 AM »
Found and connected, thanks!

I am pretty desperate to get hold of symphonies 9ff, now, btw.

Bah. *kicks desk*

Offline pencils

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Re: Hilding Rosenberg
« Reply #82 on: August 09, 2013, 01:25:45 PM »
I know not everyone thinks that Rosenberg is the strongest Nordic symphonist, and I would agree that there are others more gifted, but this musical amateur has a real love for him. Of the 8 that I have in my possession, nos.1 & 5 stand up to most rivals. Listening to 5 again now, and the lyricism just bowls me over. So many impressive sections.

Just saying.

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Re: Hilding Rosenberg
« Reply #83 on: August 09, 2013, 01:34:24 PM »
It baffles me why not more of Rosenberg's music is recorded. His Symphony no. 3 is a masterpiece of the genre, as well as being one of the greatest Swedish symphonies. It boasts one of the most powerful and memorable conclusions in all of music! I love a lot of Rosenberg's other works, but none are on the level of Symphony no. 3 IMO. Get the Blomstedt performance on Phono Suecia and avoid the Venzago one on BIS.

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Re: Hilding Rosenberg
« Reply #84 on: August 09, 2013, 01:56:09 PM »
I would agree wholeheartedly. It is a tremendous work. None of the symphonies have failed to make their mark with me, even the much longer 4th. I have a tendency to lose my grip on pieces that long, but not in this case. I guess he has simply grabbed me in the same way Holmboe did, years ago.

Go figure.

kyjo

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Re: Hilding Rosenberg
« Reply #85 on: August 09, 2013, 05:50:08 PM »
Since Rosenberg's music (especially his orchestral output) is so poorly represented on disc, it might be of interest to Rosenberg admirers here that some of his unrecorded works have been uploaded to YouTube:

Symphony no. 1: http://youtu.be/ZlmaWL-112k
Symphony no. 7: http://youtu.be/d0vQFz_SkeM
Symphony no. 8 In Candidum: http://youtu.be/rKeNXHKLGqI
Viola Concerto: http://youtu.be/EqVRO6hlUsg

All are excellent works that make me wonder why no commercial recordings exist!

Offline pencils

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Re: Hilding Rosenberg
« Reply #86 on: August 09, 2013, 09:37:03 PM »
Since Rosenberg's music (especially his orchestral output) is so poorly represented on disc, it might be of interest to Rosenberg admirers here that some of his unrecorded works have been uploaded to YouTube:

Symphony no. 1: http://youtu.be/ZlmaWL-112k
Symphony no. 7: http://youtu.be/d0vQFz_SkeM
Symphony no. 8 In Candidum: http://youtu.be/rKeNXHKLGqI
Viola Concerto: http://youtu.be/EqVRO6hlUsg

All are excellent works that make me wonder why no commercial recordings exist!

That's where I picked these up. I can cope with the radio voice overs, coughing and general audience of noises, because they are excellent. Each one has charm and deserves recording, but 1 is outstanding.

Online vandermolen

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Re: Hilding Rosenberg
« Reply #87 on: August 09, 2013, 10:39:31 PM »
I'm currently in Stockholm but doubt I'll be allowed anywhere near a CD shop; however, I have been thinking of my favourite Swedish composers, notably Rosenberg, Pettersson, Peterson-Berger, Wiren, Larsson and Atterberg. My family out here played a CD featuring music by Alfven and Lars Erik Larsson's engaging Pastoral Suite. I had Rosenberg's 8th Symphony on LP but did not like it as much as No 2,3,4 or 6. I must listen to No 1 on You Tube.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline pencils

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Re: Hilding Rosenberg
« Reply #88 on: August 14, 2013, 03:40:37 AM »
I'm currently in Stockholm but doubt I'll be allowed anywhere near a CD shop; however, I have been thinking of my favourite Swedish composers, notably Rosenberg, Pettersson, Peterson-Berger, Wiren, Larsson and Atterberg. My family out here played a CD featuring music by Alfven and Lars Erik Larsson's engaging Pastoral Suite. I had Rosenberg's 8th Symphony on LP but did not like it as much as No 2,3,4 or 6. I must listen to No 1 on You Tube.

Reading this, I'm reminded again that we have similar areas of interest. Hope your time in Stockholm is going well  :)

Any thoughts on the Rosenberg 1?

Offline Androcles

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Re: Hilding Rosenberg
« Reply #89 on: October 16, 2016, 01:25:47 PM »
I've been working my way through the Rosenberg Symphonies on Youtube.

I'm currently listening No. 8 and it seems to work very well. Apparently it exists in two versions - from 1974 with a choir and from 1980 without. Any thoughts on which is best, and where it might be possible to get hold of the 1980 version.

I also quite enjoyed the first three and No. 7. I sense that this is is a composer whose Symphonies would reward repeated hearing.

On the other hand, I remember being distinctly underwhelmed by the recording of Symphony No. 4 ( why I haven't investigated further until now). The work doesn't seem to gel, at least for me. Does anyone have any thoughts on this piece?

One further thought is that he somehow reminds me of Rubbra. I'm not sure why.
And, moreover, it is art in its most general and comprehensive form that is here discussed, for the dialogue embraces everything connected with it, from its greatest object, the state, to its least, the embellishment of sensuous existence.

Online vandermolen

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Re: Hilding Rosenberg
« Reply #90 on: October 16, 2016, 09:58:11 PM »
I've been working my way through the Rosenberg Symphonies on Youtube.

I'm currently listening No. 8 and it seems to work very well. Apparently it exists in two versions - from 1974 with a choir and from 1980 without. Any thoughts on which is best, and where it might be possible to get hold of the 1980 version.

I also quite enjoyed the first three and No. 7. I sense that this is is a composer whose Symphonies would reward repeated hearing.

On the other hand, I remember being distinctly underwhelmed by the recording of Symphony No. 4 ( why I haven't investigated further until now). The work doesn't seem to gel, at least for me. Does anyone have any thoughts on this piece?

One further thought is that he somehow reminds me of Rubbra. I'm not sure why.
I wouldn't disagree with the Rubbra analogy. The redemptive (IMHO) ending of Rubbra's Symphony 4, for examples, has echoes of the endings of Rosenberg's symphonies 2 and 3. These are my two favourite Rosenberg symphonies and amongst my favourite 20th symphonies. No.3, in particular, is a masterpiece. It's a shame that BIS did not produce a symphony cycle. I had No.8 on LP but did not like it as much as the earlier ones. No.4 has some great moments although some longeurs too. Nice to see this thread revived. I have three versions of Symphony 3 on Finlandia, BIS and Phono Suecia.. All are good. I'm pleased that the British conductor Sir Andrew Davis recorded it.
« Last Edit: October 16, 2016, 10:11:12 PM by vandermolen »
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Androcles

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Re: Hilding Rosenberg
« Reply #91 on: October 16, 2016, 11:17:43 PM »
No.3, in particular, is a masterpiece. It's a shame that BIS did not produce a symphony cycle. I had No.8 on LP but did not like it as much as the earlier ones... I have three versions of Symphony 3 on Finlandia, BIS and Phono Suecia.. All are good. I'm pleased that the British conductor Sir Andrew Davis recorded it.

Thanks for your comments. I might just have a crack at listening to the Symphony No. 3 a few more times. I need to have a listen to 5 and 6 too.
And, moreover, it is art in its most general and comprehensive form that is here discussed, for the dialogue embraces everything connected with it, from its greatest object, the state, to its least, the embellishment of sensuous existence.

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Re: Hilding Rosenberg
« Reply #92 on: October 17, 2016, 12:25:18 AM »
Yes, indeed, good to see Rosenberg revived.  I actually think very highly of Johannes Uppenbarelse, while admitting it is a bit of an odd one.  Sadly, the best version, on a double LP conducted by Herbert Blomstedt, never made it onto CD and is completely unavailable - copies must be worth a fortune.  The Ehrling is good, although lacking some of Blomstedt's urgency and sheer power (the "Beast" section was hair-raising, I recall).  There was another LP version I also remember hearing (Lucerne Festival, possibly) in which the chorus sang in Swedish and the baritone in German, which only accentuated the oddity.

Robert Layton has referred to Örtagårdsmästaren as HR's masterpiece, which I can more or less understand, although the last movement is a bit of a shout.  It's very good to see the Westerberg performance, I assume captured off-air from Sveriges Radio, on YouTube, as it's the only alternative to Rosenberg's own ancient recordng.  The neglect of this one on disc is inexplicable - if the first couple of minutes of it aren't among the most beautiful things written last century, then I'm the Swedish Chef.

I can remember the BIS cycle being talked of for several years, then being dropped, supposedly because of disagreements between conductor and production team.  Great shame.
"All the world is birthday cake" - George Harrison

Online vandermolen

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Re: Hilding Rosenberg
« Reply #93 on: October 17, 2016, 07:26:45 AM »
I'd forgotten to mention Symphony 6 - it is a marvellous work, reminding me of the work of Vagn Holmboe although others may disagree. Anyway it is a powerful score with a strong sense of nature. It was my first encounter with Rosenberg on a Vox/Turnabout LP. The same performance is available with a wonderful performance of Symphony 3 on a Phono Suecia CD. Very expensive on Amazon UK but much cheaper on the American Amazon site. I think that this is the greatest Rosenberg CD as it features fine performances of two of his most inspiriting works:

"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Online vandermolen

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Re: Hilding Rosenberg
« Reply #94 on: October 17, 2016, 07:29:50 AM »
Thanks for your comments. I might just have a crack at listening to the Symphony No. 3 a few more times. I need to have a listen to 5 and 6 too.
I love the redemptive 'triumph over the odds' last movement of Symphony 3.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Androcles

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Re: Hilding Rosenberg
« Reply #95 on: October 18, 2016, 08:00:23 AM »
I had a more concentrated listen to the 3rd yesterday. I see what you mean. The finale is impressive. It also seems better constructed than the 4th.
And, moreover, it is art in its most general and comprehensive form that is here discussed, for the dialogue embraces everything connected with it, from its greatest object, the state, to its least, the embellishment of sensuous existence.

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Re: Hilding Rosenberg
« Reply #96 on: October 18, 2016, 11:58:22 AM »
I had a more concentrated listen to the 3rd yesterday. I see what you mean. The finale is impressive. It also seems better constructed than the 4th.
Agreed. Try the end of Symphony 2 'Sinfonia Grave' which is similarly inspiriting.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Androcles

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Re: Hilding Rosenberg
« Reply #97 on: October 20, 2016, 01:16:11 PM »
Yes, indeed, good to see Rosenberg revived.  I actually think very highly of Johannes Uppenbarelse, while admitting it is a bit of an odd one.  Sadly, the best version, on a double LP conducted by Herbert Blomstedt, never made it onto CD and is completely unavailable - copies must be worth a fortune.  The Ehrling is good, although lacking some of Blomstedt's urgency and sheer power (the "Beast" section was hair-raising, I recall).  There was another LP version I also remember hearing (Lucerne Festival, possibly) in which the chorus sang in Swedish and the baritone in German, which only accentuated the oddity.

Robert Layton has referred to Örtagårdsmästaren as HR's masterpiece, which I can more or less understand, although the last movement is a bit of a shout.  It's very good to see the Westerberg performance, I assume captured off-air from Sveriges Radio, on YouTube, as it's the only alternative to Rosenberg's own ancient recordng.  The neglect of this one on disc is inexplicable - if the first couple of minutes of it aren't among the most beautiful things written last century, then I'm the Swedish Chef.

I can remember the BIS cycle being talked of for several years, then being dropped, supposedly because of disagreements between conductor and production team.  Great shame.

I just had a listen to the Westerberg version of Symphony 5 on Youtube. Very impressive, I thought. Rosenberg seems to me to get some very light-filled sounds from the orchestra. His music sometimes reminds me of a stained- glass window. I thought the final movement wasn't too bad.
And, moreover, it is art in its most general and comprehensive form that is here discussed, for the dialogue embraces everything connected with it, from its greatest object, the state, to its least, the embellishment of sensuous existence.

Online vandermolen

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Re: Hilding Rosenberg
« Reply #98 on: October 20, 2016, 01:53:33 PM »
I just had a listen to the Westerberg version of Symphony 5 on Youtube. Very impressive, I thought. Rosenberg seems to me to get some very light-filled sounds from the orchestra. His music sometimes reminds me of a stained- glass window. I thought the final movement wasn't too bad.
I like the stained-glass window analogy - particularly with Symphony 4. I have Rosenberg conducting Symphony 5 in a boxed set of him conducting his own work - I must listen to it again although I'm sure that 2 and 3 will remain my favourites.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Online vandermolen

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Re: Hilding Rosenberg
« Reply #99 on: October 20, 2016, 01:55:39 PM »
I just had a listen to the Westerberg version of Symphony 5 on Youtube. Very impressive, I thought. Rosenberg seems to me to get some very light-filled sounds from the orchestra. His music sometimes reminds me of a stained- glass window. I thought the final movement wasn't too bad.
I like the stained-glass window analogy - particularly with Symphony 4. I have Rosenberg conducting Symphony 5 in a boxed set of him conducting his own work - I must listen to it again although I'm sure that 2 and 3 will remain my favourites:


This box set used to be incredibly expensive but now you can pick it up relatively cheaply on Amazon UK.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).