Author Topic: Bach on the piano  (Read 114770 times)

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Offline San Antone

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Re: Bach on the piano
« Reply #740 on: October 28, 2019, 08:56:53 AM »


Bach : Partitas
Anton Batagov

I like this.

Was it milk that said he did not like this Batagov?  Conversely, I am enjoying it, and wish he would record more Bach.   8)

Offline milk

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Re: Bach on the piano
« Reply #741 on: October 28, 2019, 09:03:16 PM »
Have you heard Sokolov?

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/2krTDn6MSWY" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/2krTDn6MSWY</a>

yes, you pointed me to this a while back and I ended up grabbing a bunch of other Sokolov too. It’s pretty amazing stuff. Too bad he doesn’t really record. I have to listen again today but it seemed to me that Sokolov is on a weird plane of his own.
I think he does Frescobaldi Byrd and Buxtehude too?
Was it milk that said he did not like this Batagov?  Conversely, I am enjoying it, and wish he would record more Bach.   8)
Should I try this again? At the time I listened, it just offended my ears but maybe another try will change things. 

Offline milk

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Re: Bach on the piano
« Reply #742 on: October 29, 2019, 12:20:08 AM »
Have you heard Sokolov?

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/2krTDn6MSWY" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/2krTDn6MSWY</a>
His recorded Bach doesn’t light me up like this live baroque.

Offline Mandryka

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Re: Bach on the piano
« Reply #743 on: October 29, 2019, 06:19:58 AM »
His recorded Bach doesn’t light me up like this live baroque.

In his are of fugue, the way he makes the piano play counterpoint is something which impressed me! There’s a lot which is debatable about the performances, for example for me the way he uses loud and soft doesn’t really enhance the music.  But I think from the point of view of counterpoint, he has shown that it can be done on such an instrument.
« Last Edit: October 29, 2019, 06:21:46 AM by Mandryka »
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Offline SurprisedByBeauty

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  • Back. Hello!
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    anything from Monteverdi to Widmann and well beyond in either direction and everything in the middle!
Re: Bach on the piano
« Reply #744 on: October 30, 2019, 08:12:57 AM »
Absolutely 10/10.
Just stay clear of him crossing over to the Dark Side  ???


Bach Reworks (Part 2) : Víkingur Ólafsson

 ;D I've heard about that. Now I perversely must inquire.



Bach : Partitas
Anton Batagov

I like this.

That's a good one, indeed! Whacky, but splendid. https://www.forbes.com/sites/jenslaurson/2018/03/21/classical-cd-of-the-week-anton-batagovs-bach-is-for-tripping/ (The only review I wrote that Philip Glass was ever complimentary about. :))

Offline Mandryka

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Re: Bach on the piano
« Reply #745 on: October 30, 2019, 08:47:36 AM »
(The only review I wrote that Philip Glass was ever complimentary about. :))

The reference to Einstein on the Beach made me think of something, a cluster of ideas I want to propose possibly to be refuted.

One thing that is striking about Glass’s music from that time is that it is totally superficial - what I mean is that it’s all about surface sound, where you have many instruments playing they all play at the same volume, and in a way which means they never collide, they always produce simple harmonies. There’s no sense of mystery, of poetry concealed in deep levels of the music - it’s all in ya face.

Now Batagov’s Bach is like this, that’s what happens when you slow it down and when you align the voices like he does. The most you can say for it is that Batagov’s Bach was a composer who liked playing two tunes at the same time and he knew how to do that and make it sound slick.

He’s taken the counterpoint out of the greatest contrupuntalust ever.

It is true that you could imagine a vocalise and melody instrument performance like Batagov’s toccata from Partita 6, the vocalise being made of solfège. 1-2-3, 1-2-3, 1-2-3.



« Last Edit: October 30, 2019, 09:07:05 AM by Mandryka »
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Offline Mandryka

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Re: Bach on the piano
« Reply #746 on: November 01, 2019, 09:11:07 AM »


Listening to the 4th and 5th suite here for the first time in years, what I’m struck by is the beautiful and imaginative ornamentation.
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Offline San Antone

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Re: Bach on the piano
« Reply #747 on: November 01, 2019, 09:19:27 AM »


Listening to the 4th and 5th suite here for the first time in years, what I’m struck by is the beautiful and imaginative ornamentation.

Yes, I like Koroliov's Bach quite a lot.  I have also been listening to Vladimir Feltsman, and while his treatment of this music is very different from Koroliov's, his Bach recordings are also enjoyable but for entirely different reasons.

Vladimir Feltsman : The Bach Collection


Offline San Antone

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Re: Bach on the piano
« Reply #748 on: November 09, 2019, 03:05:07 PM »
Cédric Pescia has recorded three of the major keyboard works by Bach, The Well-Tempered Clavier, The Goldberg Variations, and Art of Fugue.



I just discovered them, and am finding them very good.