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Florestan´s Romantic Salon

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Florestan:
My intention in starting this thread is to create a genial meeting place for all those interested in discussing all things Romantic. The main focus is of course music, but in keeping with a genuine Romantic spirit, talking about, and commenting on, literature, visual arts and philosophy is welcome and encouraged. As long as there is a connection to Romanticism, there is no offtopic here.

So, you are all warmly invited to join in and bring your love (or lack thereof) and knowledge of, and perspective about, Romantic music (and Romanticism in general). Whether a particular composer or recording, an interesting book or article on the subject, or simply your own ideas and thoughts, feel free to express yourself in complete liberty: people who dislike, or even hate, Romanticism are most welcome too, there is always something interesting to learn from the opposition, and we might even be able to make a few converts.

Thanks for reading.

Cheers,
Florestan

I´ll start right off by recommending you this article, which is quite illuminating about what (mainly German) Romanticism was all about and is accompanied by some very nice musical examples which allow anyone to build his own concert using whatever recordings of the musical material they want.

http://www.goetzrichter.com/pages/Writings/Romanticism.pdf

Btw, does anyone know a (good) recording of Nietzsche´s works for violin and piano?  :D

Que:
Great initiative, Andrei!  :)

Q

Florestan:

--- Quote from: Que on May 05, 2016, 01:38:29 AM ---Great initiative, Andrei!  :)

Q

--- End quote ---

Thanks a lot! Making it sticky is very kind of you.

Cato:
What a coincidence!  I had just pulled out of the archives...



An excellent examination of how the artists became wrapped up in the politics of that century.

North Star:
Very good!


Josef Danhauser: Franz Liszt playing in a Parisian salon a grand piano by Conrad Graf , who commissioned the painting; on the piano is a bust of Beethoven by Anton Dietrich; the imagined gathering shows seated Alexandre Dumas (père), George Sand, Franz Liszt, Marie d'Agoult; standing Hector Berlioz or Victor Hugo, Niccolò Paganini, Gioachino Rossini; a portrait of Byron on the wall and a statue of Joan of Arc on the far left.

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