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Florestan´s Romantic Salon

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SonicMan46:

--- Quote from: Cato on May 05, 2016, 02:25:22 AM ---What a coincidence!  I had just pulled out of the archives...



An excellent examination of how the artists became wrapped up in the politics of that century.

--- End quote ---

Cato - boy, that book looks familiar but not found in my collection (not unexpected, wife and I donate our books to local charities on an annual basis, so may have been a read before and given away?) - but I see that Andrei has already asked for some comments - thanks.  Dave :)

Florestan:

--- Quote from: Dancing Divertimentian on May 05, 2016, 12:09:23 PM ---On which side of the Beethoven fence do we stand? >:D

--- End quote ---

Some of his works are clearly Romantic, some not that much.  :D

Florestan:

--- Quote from: North Star on May 05, 2016, 10:47:36 AM ---I have indeed, and found it very good indeed. It's been several years, though.

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I have the first four volumes of Stefan Irmer´s cycle on MDG and the complete 8-volume Paolo Giacometti cycle on Channel Classics (too many covers to post). The latter has better sonics and uses a splendid-sounding 1849 Erard. It got a 10/10 rave review by Hurwitz himself.

Florestan:
Recommended article for those interested in the numerous and often rather esoteric literary connections of Schumann's solo piano music:

Is Schumann’s Album for the Young Really for the Young?

The author, one Elizabeth Green, makes an interesting case for AFTY being inspired by, and modeled after, Blake's Songs of Innocence and Experience. Give it a read --- whether you agree or not, it is a good opportunity to visit / revisit one of Schumann's most charming piano cycles. There is no dearth of good recordings: Samuil Feinberg, Carlo Zecchi, Rene Gianoli, Francoise Thinat, Alexis Weissenberg, Joerg Demus, Joseph Nagy, Michael Endres, Luba Edlina... Actually, AFTY seems to be more popular with pianists than with the audience.





Cato:

--- Quote from: Cato on May 05, 2016, 02:25:22 AM ---What a coincidence!  I had just pulled out of the archives...



An excellent examination of how the artists became wrapped up in the politics of that century.

--- End quote ---


--- Quote from: SonicMan46 on May 05, 2016, 12:45:44 PM ---Cato - boy, that book looks familiar but not found in my collection (not unexpected, wife and I donate our books to local charities on an annual basis, so may have been a read before and given away?) - but I see that Andrei has already asked for some comments - thanks.  Dave :)

--- End quote ---

Holy Madness is a tour de force: beginning with the American Revolution and ending with the Franco-Prussian War, the author shows how the concepts of Romanticism galloped across Europe, although the last chapter shows the lingering of Romanticism (as a spiritual-political force) into the 20th century.  Composers do not figure as much as writers, e.g. Goethe gets more print than Wagner, Rousseau more than Berlioz, and there is no mention of Beethoven, which lack I find inexplicable.

And yet it is an almost cinematic description of large and small players in revolutionary Europe - from Portugal to Poland and even Russia (e.g. Bakunin and Dostoyevsky are discussed).

An example from the concluding chapter: after discussing Hitler's (mad?) order that Nazis be sent into Italy to find ancient copies of the Germania by Tacitus  (which was rather laudatory toward the ancient Germanic tribes) even in 1944, Zamoyski writes:


--- Quote ---What these regimes did was to carry to their logical extremity Rousseau's ideas on the need to replace God in the workings of human society with something else that would motivate people in the desired direction.  But regimes which applied the ideas of Rousseau somehow always seemed to inherit along with them something of the obsessive  self-pitying paranoia of the man himself, and usually ended up destroying themselves through their own instruments of control and repression...

(referring to Lafayette and his peers who still believed in God in some way)...These were no mere rebels; they aspired to emulate Christ by immolating themselves for the sake of humanity....The wars and revolutions they started or embraced were acts of faith...
--- End quote ---

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