Author Topic: Florestan´s Romantic Salon  (Read 154811 times)

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Online Cato

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Re: Florestan´s Romantic Salon
« Reply #180 on: March 30, 2021, 06:41:14 AM »
Going through my library, I came across a book, which I used while teaching European History, by Adam Zamoyski.

To my dismay I saw that the book is 20+ years old now!   ???   ;)   How did that happen?!


Holy Madness





An excellent overview of the entire era!
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Offline Mandryka

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Re: Florestan´s Romantic Salon
« Reply #181 on: June 01, 2022, 08:42:48 AM »
I thought I'd sneak in this evil place of decadence quickly, before anyone notices, to say that I'm horrified to find myself enjoying this. It is the start of a slippery slope which ends in  . . . . Hummel and Liszt  :o  ??? >:( : :blank: :blank: :blank:

Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Offline vers la flamme

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Re: Florestan´s Romantic Salon
« Reply #182 on: September 15, 2022, 03:45:04 PM »
Since I'm listening to Richard Wetz's 3rd symphony and seem to have gotten myself into an exploratory mood—anyone care to recommend me a forgotten, obscure composer of the Romantic or Late Romantic whose music is worth exploring?

I have heard good things about Hans Rott. 

Offline Mapman

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Re: Florestan´s Romantic Salon
« Reply #183 on: September 15, 2022, 04:02:26 PM »
Is Charles Villiers Stanford obscure enough for you? I listened to (and posted about) his 6th symphony the other day. The 3rd is also fun (lots of Irish folk tunes).

Offline vers la flamme

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Re: Florestan´s Romantic Salon
« Reply #184 on: September 15, 2022, 05:17:13 PM »
Is Charles Villiers Stanford obscure enough for you? I listened to (and posted about) his 6th symphony the other day. The 3rd is also fun (lots of Irish folk tunes).

Yeah  :laugh: I've heard one thing of his, Songs of the Fleet. I liked it. Never heard any of his symphonies.

Online JBS

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Re: Florestan´s Romantic Salon
« Reply #185 on: September 15, 2022, 05:39:32 PM »
Since I'm listening to Richard Wetz's 3rd symphony and seem to have gotten myself into an exploratory mood—anyone care to recommend me a forgotten, obscure composer of the Romantic or Late Romantic whose music is worth exploring?

I have heard good things about Hans Rott.

Röntgen (a whole series on CPO) might fit your bill.
Have you ever listened to Gade?

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Offline vers la flamme

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Re: Florestan´s Romantic Salon
« Reply #186 on: September 15, 2022, 05:47:01 PM »
Röntgen (a whole series on CPO) might fit your bill.
Have you ever listened to Gade?

I have listened to a little bit of Gade, and I liked what I heard. Thanks for the reminder!

Röntgen, I have not heard anything of his, but I have seen the name (I suppose someone around here must have been listening to him at some point). Is there any particular entry in the CPO series that you find to be a particular standout?

Offline Mapman

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Re: Florestan´s Romantic Salon
« Reply #187 on: September 15, 2022, 05:51:12 PM »
Another composer who may interest you is the Dutch composer Johan Wagenaar. I particularly like his overture De Getemde Feeks, and his Sinfonietta. (There are 2 somewhat recent discs on CPO, as well as an older Decca recording with Chailly/Concertgebouw.)

Online JBS

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Re: Florestan´s Romantic Salon
« Reply #188 on: September 15, 2022, 05:56:16 PM »
I have listened to a little bit of Gade, and I liked what I heard. Thanks for the reminder!

Röntgen, I have not heard anything of his, but I have seen the name (I suppose someone around here must have been listening to him at some point). Is there any particular entry in the CPO series that you find to be a particular standout?

Not one in particular. (But I liked them enough to get them all.)

The Raff recordings on Tudor are all good, too, if you've never heard them.

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Offline Jo498

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Re: Florestan´s Romantic Salon
« Reply #189 on: September 15, 2022, 11:20:07 PM »
Some of the 70s/80s Raff symphonies on Tudor are quite mediocre, the more recent Stadlmair/Bamberg are much better (both playing and sound), so I would try these first. (The older ones do have some fillers not available elswhere.) #5 "Lenore" and #3 "In the forest"? are the ones I remember as more interesting than e.g. the "seasons".
 
We had a brief discussion on the Rott symphony in "New music thread". It was a major "discovery" 30-35 years ago but it has been a bit overhyped in the last time.

In general I hold the by now strangely unpopular opinion that most music/composers are not strongly over/underrated. Raff is not an unfairly overlooked great composer. He is a decent composer that deserves some interest but I think it is comparably easy to see and not unjustified why he was relegated to the 2nd or 3rd division fairly quickly after his death.
Struck by the sounds before the sun,
I knew the night had gone.
The morning breeze like a bugle blew
Against the drums of dawn.
(Bob Dylan)

Offline Florestan

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Re: Florestan´s Romantic Salon
« Reply #190 on: September 16, 2022, 12:46:48 AM »
If you want serious and substantial works I concur with Jo: you won't find much music of real interest outside the big names, which are big for a reason --- but if you are into, or would like to try, something lighter and more unpretentious you can start by checking the Hyperion Romantic Piano Concertos series, there are lots of works there which aspire to nothing more than to entertain and delight. For chamber music in the same vein, try Eduard Franck, Theodore Gouvy and the Scharwenka brothers, For piano music, the same brothers, Moritz Moszkowski and Cecile Chaminade.
"In religion, philosophy and morality, obedience; in art and literature, independence." - Ricardo Viñes

Offline MusicTurner

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Re: Florestan´s Romantic Salon
« Reply #191 on: September 16, 2022, 12:58:45 AM »
Since I'm listening to Richard Wetz's 3rd symphony and seem to have gotten myself into an exploratory mood—anyone care to recommend me a forgotten, obscure composer of the Romantic or Late Romantic whose music is worth exploring?

I have heard good things about Hans Rott.

Some suggestions:
- Paul von Klenau, the most varied CD is the one with the 5th Symphony, symphonic poems & orchestral song. Late-romantic, attractive music.
- Hans Holewa, Piano Concerto. It's in a later style, almost like Alban Berg, but still quite easy and attractive IMO.
- "Mass for Rossini", the Rilling recording. One of the most uber-impressive, Italian vocal works from that age, by several composers. Includes early versions of a section from Verdi's Requiem.
« Last Edit: September 16, 2022, 01:03:10 AM by MusicTurner »

Offline Jo498

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Re: Florestan´s Romantic Salon
« Reply #192 on: September 16, 2022, 07:34:05 AM »
I think the somewhat disproportionate recentish popularity of the Rott symphony is because both Bruckner and Mahler are looming as large in the repertoire as never before and Rott biographically belongs to both.

For very late romanticism, Franz Schmidt has also enjoyed a bit of a renaissance; I don't know his symphonies well (only the 4th used to be somewhat well known) but he has to quite interesting left hand piano concertante pieces (together on a cpo CD) and several good (if sometimes very long) chamber works.

Other favorites of mine often tend to be "odd chamber works", e.g.

August Klughardt: Fantasy pieces "Schilflieder" for oboe, viola piano ("Reed songs" but this does not mainly refer to the oboe but to a collection of poems by Nikolaus Lenau, at least one of these poems was also set was a very atmospheric song by Mendelssohn.

Carl Reinecke: Trios for different combinations, above all the one for oboe, horn, piano
Heinrich von Herzogenberg's trio for the same combination

Walter Rabl: Quartet op.1 for clarinet and piano trio (very Brahmsian, I think the guy mostly turned to teaching afterwards)
Struck by the sounds before the sun,
I knew the night had gone.
The morning breeze like a bugle blew
Against the drums of dawn.
(Bob Dylan)

Offline Symphonic Addict

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Re: Florestan´s Romantic Salon
« Reply #193 on: September 17, 2022, 08:21:00 PM »
Georg Schumann wrote two remarkable symphonies in B minor and F minor respectively, although the later has more impact.

Fritz Volbach and his Symphony in B minor. The slow movement is particularly great, somewhat Brucknerian IIRC.

The Russian-Swiss Paul Juon with his Symphonies in F sharp minor and A major. Worth investigating as well.

Felix Weingartner's first four symphonies, the others 3 lack more quality and one easily detects that.

Erno Dohnányi is hardly obscure, but his two numbered symphonies and an early Symphony in F major qualify as quite well-written and attractive music.

The Norwegian Alf Hurum and Ludvig Irgens-Jensen have each a symphony that lie on the late-Romantic category, chiefly the Hurum.

Dora Pejacevic's only Symphony in F-sharp minor, which was recently recorded by Chandos (there is another recording on CPO).

And there are more, of course.
« Last Edit: September 17, 2022, 08:23:16 PM by Symphonic Addict »
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