Author Topic: Boris Lyatoshynsky [1895-1968]  (Read 7829 times)

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Offline Scion7

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Boris Lyatoshynsky [1895-1968]
« on: June 26, 2016, 06:57:19 AM »
  Chamber
===================================

String Qt no.1, d, Op.1, 1915 
8 Preludes, pf, 1920 43 
String Qt no.2, A, Op.3, 1922 
Piano Trio no.1, Op.7, 1922, rev.1925
Reeds, for Low Voice, String Quartet, Clarinet, Horn & Harp, Op.8 
Piano Sonata no.1, Op.13, 1924 
Otrazheniya [Reflections], 7 pieces, pf, 1925 
Piano sonata no.2/Sonata-ballada, Op.18, 1925 
Sonata,vn, pf, Op.19, 1926 
String Qt no.3, Op.19, 1928 
Shevchenkivs'ka syuita [Shevchenko Suite], pf, 1942 [incomplete] 
Piano Trio no.2, Op.41, 1942 
Ukrayn'skiy kvintet, Piano Quintet, Op.42, 1942, rev.1945 
String Qt no.4, 1943 
Suite, ww qt, 1944 
Syuita na ukraynskiye narodnïye temi [Suite on Ukrainian Folk Themes], str qt, 1944
2 Pieces for Viola & Piano, Op.58
Concert Etude - Rondo, for Piano


  Orchestral
===================================

Symphony no.1, A, Op.2, 1918 19 
Fantasticheskiy marsh, 1920 
Uvertyura na chotyry ukraïns'ky narodny temy [Ov. on 4 Ukrainian Folk Themes], Op.20, 1926 
Zolotyi obruch, suite, 1929  3 marches, ww, 1933 6 
Symphony no.2, Op.26, 1935 6, rev. 1940 
Poma vossoyedineniya [Poem of Reunification], Op.49, 1949 50 
Symphony no.3, b, Op.50, 1951, rev. 1954 
Taras Shevchenko, suite, Op.51, 1952 [from film score] 
Slavyanskiy kontsert [Slavic Concerto], pf, orch, Op.54, 1953 
Romeo i Dzhul'yetta [Romeo and Juliet], Op.55, 1955 [suite from incidental music] 
Grazhyna, ballad, Op.58, 1955 
Na berehakh Visly [On the Banks of the Vistula], Symphony poem, Op.59, 1958
Intermezzo for Orchestra, 1960 
Pol'skaya syuita [Polish Suite], 1961 
Slavyanskaya uvertyura, 1961 
Symphony no.4, bb, Op.63, 1963 
Liricheskaya poma, 1964 - Lyric poem 'In Memory of R. Glier' Op.66
Symphony no.5  Slavyanskaya  [Slavonic], C, Op.67, 1965 6 
Slavyanskaya syuita [Slavonic Suite], Op.68, 1966 
Urochista Uvertyura [Solemn Overture], Op.70, 1967


  Stage
===============

Zolotyi obruch [The Golden Ring] (music drama, 4, Ya. Mamontov, after I. Franko), Op.23, 1929,
Odessa, Kiev, Khar'kiv, 1930  rev. version L'viv, 1970 
Shchors (op, 5, I. Kochergi, M. Ryl's'ky), Op.37, 1937 
Kiev, 14 Sept 1938, rev. as Polkovodets [The Commander], Kiev, 18 Feb 1970

Ukrainian composer. Studied with Gliere in 1913 at the law faculty of Kiev University.
The Grove:

                          His style – and especially the harmonic language employed in works of the 1920s – bears comparison to that of Kodály and Nielsen as well as that of Berg and Hindemith. Like his slightly younger colleague Shostakovich, he never totally abandoned tonality no matter how much he expanded its meaning.
« Last Edit: October 17, 2020, 12:13:45 AM by Scion7 »
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Offline Scion7

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Re: Boris Lyatoshynsky [1895-1968]
« Reply #1 on: June 26, 2016, 07:43:00 AM »
   
« Last Edit: October 17, 2020, 12:14:45 AM by Scion7 »
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Offline Scion7

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Re: Boris Lyatoshynsky [1895-1968]
« Reply #2 on: June 26, 2016, 07:45:49 AM »
 
« Last Edit: October 17, 2020, 12:15:08 AM by Scion7 »
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Re: Boris Lyatoshyns'ky's love-in [1895-1968]
« Reply #3 on: June 26, 2016, 11:28:53 AM »
All good stuff. I especially like 'Grazhyna' and Symphony 3 but all the symphonies are good. Amazingly, when I was on holiday, in the UK, a year ago I was in a shop and the radio was on playing a piece of classical music which I really liked but did not recognise - it was 'Grazhyna'. For starters I'd get the disc with symphonies 2 and 3 on - powerful, tonal and brooding music. The Marco Polo releases are now all on Naxos:



« Last Edit: June 26, 2016, 11:33:40 AM by vandermolen »
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Scion7

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Re: Boris Lyatoshynsky [1895-1968]
« Reply #4 on: June 26, 2016, 02:22:13 PM »
One may still obtain the Marco Polo releases since they have not all disappeared from the first run:



^ click me to save the European Union (every click adds a penny)  >:D
« Last Edit: October 17, 2020, 12:16:10 AM by Scion7 »
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Offline Scion7

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Re: Boris Lyatoshynsky [1895-1968]
« Reply #5 on: June 27, 2016, 12:01:38 AM »






 :)
« Last Edit: October 17, 2020, 12:16:27 AM by Scion7 »
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Offline Scion7

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Re: Boris Lyatoshynsky [1895-1968]
« Reply #6 on: June 27, 2016, 12:07:32 AM »
Also on DeepDiscount.com, I believe.



« Last Edit: October 17, 2020, 12:13:26 AM by Scion7 »
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Offline Scion7

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Re: Boris Lyatoshynsky [1895-1968]
« Reply #7 on: June 27, 2016, 12:23:21 AM »


^ to to enlarge
There are deep, dark places on the internet where both of these pieces may be tracked down . . . since the record companies are clueless.
« Last Edit: October 17, 2020, 12:16:48 AM by Scion7 »
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« Last Edit: October 17, 2020, 12:17:10 AM by Scion7 »
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Offline Scion7

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Re: Boris Lyatoshynsky [1895-1968]
« Reply #9 on: June 27, 2016, 09:35:41 AM »




Borys Mykolayovych Lyatoshynsky (Mykola is the Ukrainian equivalent of Nikolai) grew up and came to maturity at the apogee of this short-lived ‘Ukrainian Renaissance’ of writers, artists, musicians, choreographers and philosophers, parallel to and contemporaneous with Russia’s Silver Age. In keeping with the convulsive political and social instability of the times, artists and thinkers threw off the restrictions of convention to experiment with new forms, new ideas, new language, new approaches to religion, mysticism and the occult. Collisions abounded: the aesthetic refinement of Symbolism with the urban barbarity of Futurism, untrammelled individualism with collective sobornost (national and group solidarity), spirituality with decadence. The time, the place and the milieu produced such artists, writers and thinkers eventually to grace the world stage as Lev Shestov, Nikolai Berdyaev, Mikhail Bulgakov, Vladimir Tatlin, David Burliuk, Ilya Repin, Sholem Aleichem, Vasily Grossman, Isaac Babel, Leon Trotsky, Sergei Prokofiev, Leonid Utyosov, Anatoly Lunacharsky, Serge Lifar, Vatslav and Bronislava Nijinsky, Alexandra Exter, Heinrich Neuhaus, Sviatoslav Richter, Emil Gilels, Ilya Ehrenburg – although hardly any of these powerful creative spirits would either at the time or now be recognised as Ukrainian. That is the point, as the writer and polemicist Mykola Khvyl’ovyi argued with such vehemence in his references to ‘rozstriliane Vidrodzhennia’ (‘the executed Renaissance’) – and his rallying war cry ‘Het’vid Moskvu!’ (‘Away with Moscow’). Khvyl’ovyi, despairing, committed suicide in 1933.
   Lyatoshynsky thus emerged from a cradle of germinating imagination. He was born in 1895 to a cultivated middle-class family – his father was a local headmaster and school director – in Zhitomir, now in north-western Ukraine near the Polish border but then the regional capital of Volhynia, a still mainly rural Governorate of the Russian Empire populated predominantly by Ukrainian-Russians with substantial German, Polish and Jewish communities. He attended the local gymnazium and on graduation entered the University of Kiev where he studied law. At the same time he joined the composition class of Reinhold Glière, who had come home to Kiev to head the newly founded Kiev Conservatoire. Glière, who had been the first proper teacher of the young Prokofiev, another gifted young composer from rural Ukraine, not only gave Lyatoshynsky a similarly solid and comprehensive grounding in compositional technique and musical form, but as can be seen from their extensive and candid correspondence extending from 1913 to Glière’s death in 1956 and published in 2002, became a lifelong friend and mentor.
  - excerpt from the notes
« Last Edit: October 17, 2020, 12:19:24 AM by Scion7 »
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Offline Scion7

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Re: Boris Lyatoshynsky's love-in [1895-1968]
« Reply #10 on: June 27, 2016, 07:40:49 PM »
The piano music is a bit spiky, but well composed and played well on this release.   

« Last Edit: June 27, 2016, 07:43:24 PM by Scion7 »
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Re: Boris Lyatoshynsky [1895-1968]
« Reply #11 on: June 27, 2016, 09:42:44 PM »
I wasn't able to find any commercial release of these.
This live tv broadcast contains part of "Golden Crown."

THE CONCERT PROGRAMME:
1. Symphonic poem «Reunion»
Symphonic poem on the occasion of the unification between Eastern
and Western Ukraine (1949)
2. Male chorus from the opera «Commander» – «Cossack is being brought»
Excerpts of the opera «Golden Сrown» with the soloists,
chorus and orchestra of the theater.
Introduction. Galician dance and choir
The scene in the mountains – Maxim, Miroslava andTugar Wolf
Tatar camp – Miroslava, Tatar chorus, Chinese and final dances
The scene in the cave Dazhbogin the Zelemenrocks – monologue and scene by Zakhar Berkut.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NnxfwomOaTM
« Last Edit: October 17, 2020, 12:22:03 AM by Scion7 »
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Offline Scion7

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Re: Boris Lyatoshynsky's love-in [1895-1968]
« Reply #12 on: June 27, 2016, 10:04:21 PM »
All good stuff.

Have you tried out the Violin sonata, String Quartet No.2, or the Piano trio yet?
There are three different commercial postings for the Violin sonata on YT to try out.
Besides the older TNC account, over the past year two different versions were issued.
An impressive piece.  Should be in snyprrr's listening que!   :)
« Last Edit: June 28, 2016, 02:19:31 AM by Scion7 »
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Re: Boris Lyatoshynsky's love-in [1895-1968]
« Reply #13 on: June 28, 2016, 08:04:22 AM »
Have you tried out the Violin sonata, String Quartet No.2, or the Piano trio yet?
There are three different commercial postings for the Violin sonata on YT to try out.
Besides the older TNC account, over the past year two different versions were issued.
An impressive piece.  Should be in snyprrr's listening que!   :)
No, but many thanks for recommendation. :)
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

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Re: Boris Lyatoshynsky's love-in [1895-1968]
« Reply #14 on: June 29, 2016, 05:46:16 AM »
On an unrelated, but perhaps slightly related note, I met two Ukrainian women yesterday who not only were extremely attractive, but knew who Prokofiev was. Too bad they said they were only in Georgia for the summer. :(
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Re: Boris Lyatoshynsky's love-in [1895-1968]
« Reply #15 on: June 29, 2016, 01:48:36 PM »
On an unrelated, but perhaps slightly related note, I met two Ukrainian women yesterday who not only were extremely attractive, but knew who Prokofiev was. Too bad they said they were only in Georgia for the summer. :(
Had they heard of Lyatoshynsky? Surely a great chat-up line.  8)
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

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Re: Boris Lyatoshynsky's love-in [1895-1968]
« Reply #16 on: July 12, 2016, 06:51:22 AM »
Had they heard of Lyatoshynsky? Surely a great chat-up line.  8)

I think I'd feel more comfortable to talk to them about Silvestrov more than Lyatoshynsky. :) I still haven't cracked Lyatoshynsky's music yet. There seems to be no kind of access points in the music and his general style is quite difficult to understand. I've heard all of his symphonies and they remain puzzling to me. My hats are off to those that have figured out this composer. What makes his music tick?
« Last Edit: July 12, 2016, 06:54:15 AM by Mirror Image »
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Re: Boris Lyatoshynsky's love-in [1895-1968]
« Reply #17 on: July 12, 2016, 10:33:01 AM »
I think I'd feel more comfortable to talk to them about Silvestrov more than Lyatoshynsky. :) I still haven't cracked Lyatoshynsky's music yet. There seems to be no kind of access points in the music and his general style is quite difficult to understand. I've heard all of his symphonies and they remain puzzling to me. My hats are off to those that have figured out this composer. What makes his music tick?
Just saw this post. Try Symphony 3 again John as I think that is the most approachable. The craggy dissonance and sense of looming tragedy appeals to me.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Boris Lyatoshynsky's love-in [1895-1968]
« Reply #18 on: July 12, 2016, 11:51:14 AM »
Just saw this post. Try Symphony 3 again John as I think that is the most approachable. The craggy dissonance and sense of looming tragedy appeals to me.

Will do, Jeffrey. 8)
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Re: Boris Lyatoshynsky's love-in [1895-1968]
« Reply #19 on: July 12, 2016, 12:43:15 PM »
On an unrelated, but perhaps slightly related note, I met two Ukrainian women yesterday who not only were extremely attractive, but knew who Prokofiev was. Too bad they said they were only in Georgia for the summer. :(

You mean you won't consider Kiev for the winter?  ;)

Listen to Symphonies 3 followed by 2. Frankly, these are the only two works by him that I really liked.
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