Museums you've visited (or want to see)

Started by (poco) Sforzando, June 27, 2016, 02:02:00 PM

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Christo

... music is not only an 'entertainment', nor a mere luxury, but a necessity of the spiritual if not of the physical life, an opening of those magic casements through which we can catch a glimpse of that country where ultimate reality will be found.    RVW, 1948

Parsifal

Quote from: mc ukrneal on September 16, 2016, 05:03:17 AM
If one only gets to St. Petersburg, there is of course the Russian Museum, which houses much Russian art. It is especially good if you like paintings of ships and water.

I don't know about the Russian museum in st Petersburg, but ships and water is not what I recall from the Tretyakof.   

The most striking painting I recall there is Boyarynya Morozova by Vasily Surikov

PerfectWagnerite

#42
Quote from: Scarpia on September 16, 2016, 11:16:38 AM
I don't know about the Russian museum in st Petersburg, but ships and water is not what I recall from the Tretyakof.   

The most striking painting I recall there is Boyarynya Morozova by Vasily Surikov

I can imagine...

Even looking at it on my computer monitor the realism and expressive power is overwhelming.

Speaking of ships and water maybe in reference to The Conquest of Siberia by Yermak Timofeyevich.

kishnevi

#43
this one, I assume


The Execution of the Streltsi is more potent for me.  Not sure which museum it is in.

PerfectWagnerite

Quote from: Jeffrey Smith on September 16, 2016, 11:43:33 AM
this one, I assume

The Execution of the Streltsi is more potent for me.  Not sure which museum it is in.


Wiki says Tretyakov Gallery.

Anyway another great painting...That Peter the Great sure knows how to keep them down doesn't he?

k a rl h e nn i ng

A strong leader!

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Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
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nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

PerfectWagnerite

Quote from: k a rl h e nn i ng on September 16, 2016, 12:08:33 PM
A strong leader!

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Exactly, just what were the Streltsi thinking? Sometimes you just f*cked with the wrong Tsar.

The new erato

Quote from: k a rl h e nn i ng on September 16, 2016, 12:08:33 PM
A strong leader!

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He sure wouldn't have let any Mexicans in!

PerfectWagnerite

Quote from: The new erato on September 16, 2016, 01:20:06 PM
He sure wouldn't have let any Mexicans in!
Yes, he makes Putin look like Mother Theresa by comparison.


Wanderer

For Parisians and visitors to Paris: a new exhibition on Magritte begins today at the Centre Pompidou: René Magritte: La trahison des images (21 September 2016 - 23 January 2017).

Spineur

From Oct 22nd 2016 to Feb. 20 2017, Sergei Sbchukin collection at the Louis Vuitton Foundation (a beautiful new building overlooking the bois de Boulogne).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sergei_Shchukin

Sergei Sbchukin, a textile russian buissnesman, build the most extraordinary collection of impressionist and moderns just before WWI.  His and Morosov collections were confiscated at the revolution and dispersed to a number of russian museums by Stalin in 1948.  It has been reunited for the first time and will be show at Louis Vuitton foundation

http://www.fondationlouisvuitton.fr/expositions/icones-de-l-art-moderne.html#

It is on my agenda for my Nov 19th trip to Paris opera.

Right now we have a much smaller but nice Kandinsky exhibit at the Grenoble museum.  IT is devoted to the last period of the artist life (1933-1944)

http://www.grenoble.fr/agenda/19257/38-exposition-kandinsky.-les-annees-parisiennes-1933-1944-.htm





Spineur

#52
By the way, Shchukin paid this Gauguin 4000 francs in 1907.   According to INSEE calculator this is about 16000 today's euros.  Not dirt cheap, but about 1/1000 of what it is worth today.

http://www.insee.fr/fr/service/reviser/calcul-pouvoir-achat.asp?sommeDepart=20000&deviseDepart=Euro&anneeDepart=2015&deviseArrivee=AncFranc&anneeArrivee=1907

Spineur

#53
I went to see Shchukin (Chtchoukine in French) collection a second time as the exhibit was extended to March 7th.
I also saw Frédéric Bazille exhibit at the musée d'Orsay.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fr%C3%A9d%C3%A9ric_Bazille
http://www.musee-orsay.fr/en/events/exhibitions/in-the-musee-dorsay/exhibitions-in-the-musee-dorsay/article/frederic-bazille-44076.html

He was a close friend of Monet, Cézanne and Sisley and lived together in their ealy twenties.  He participated to the birth of impressionism.  He was incredibly gifted, but died during the Franco prussian war of 1870 at the age of 28.  In the seven year of creative life as a painter he achieved a great deal.  He also was a big fan of classical music and was a pianist.  Had he lived he would have been as well known as his friends.  The exhibit was extremely well layed out.  Highly recomended, if yo get the opportunity.



Christo

Quote from: Scarpia on September 16, 2016, 11:16:38 AM
I don't know about the Russian museum in st Petersburg, but ships and water is not what I recall from the Tretyakof.   

The most striking painting I recall there is Boyarynya Morozova by Vasily Surikov

Absolutely fine, as much more there: but the most striking paintings in the Russian Museum for me are in the Repin collection, especially the ones that are too big and cannot be transported (the smaller ones are also once in a while on show here in the Netherlands). Like for example the Ceremonial Session of the State Council in 1900:
... music is not only an 'entertainment', nor a mere luxury, but a necessity of the spiritual if not of the physical life, an opening of those magic casements through which we can catch a glimpse of that country where ultimate reality will be found.    RVW, 1948

Spineur

Exposition Fantin Latour, born in Grenoble.  An exhibit co-produced by Luxembourg museum and Grenoble museum is opening here soon.

http://www.museedegrenoble.fr/1811-a-venir-fantin-latour.htm

pjme

#56
The Plantin - Moretus Museum in Antwerp was closed for almost two years. An extension / depot was built to house the library and offices . It reopened in sept. 2016. More rooms are now open to the public. Fascinating place, wonderful portraits by Rubens. Discover the letter types made by mr. Garamond etc.

The original residence and workshop of the Plantin and Moretus publishing dynasty offers you a unique historical experience, which is why it is a Unesco world heritage site. The building's creaking oak planks and panels seem imbued in the history of books, the art of printing and the story of a family's entrepreneurial flair. The oldest printing presses in the world can be found here, and much more besides...

The Museum Plantin-Moretus presents three hundred years of book-printing art and family history. You can admire the oldest printing presses in the world and a rich collection of art, including portraits by Rubens. In the library, you will find manuscripts, incunabula and original prints. And the archives tell you about daily life in both the printing works and the mansion.




Don't miss it when visiting Antwerp!

http://www.museumplantinmoretus.be/en

P.

ritter

#57
After a week's work in Cannes (attending the biggest European trade fair of my industry), I was joined by my companion for a long weekend on the Côte d'Azur (taking advantage of the fact that Monday March 20th was a local holiday here in Madrid).

Top on my list of places to visit was the Fondation Maeght in St.-Paul-de-Vence, which I had been to as a teenager almost 40 years ago (!), and which I can only describe as a magical place. Josep Lluis Sert's bulding is very attractive (as is the same architect's Fundación Miró in Barcelona), and is the perfect setting--set among 14 hectares of pine woods--for this entreprising endeavour started by art gallerists Aimé and Marguerite Maeght and inaugurated in 1964.The collection on display is not huge (including a magnificent Bonnard, some Calders, etc.), but what really is stunning are the scuptures and murals in the gardens (by Giacometti, Miró, Braque...). The (large) temporary exhibit was a retrospective of the distinguished German painter A. R. Penck (interesting, but not really  my thing--very reminiscent at times of Keith Haring and Basquiat).

The building by Sert:


Georges Braque's mosaic for a pond in an internal patio:


The Giacometti courtyard:


The Miró labyrinth:


Pierre Bonnard's huge L'Été:


We also visited the Musée Picasso in Antibes, housed in that town's castle. The collection consists mainly of Picasso works from the years 1946 and 1947, sometimes using unusual materials (e.g. asbestos slabs).

The museum:


Picasso's La joie de vivre (one of the highlights of the collection IMHO):


But what really drew me to this musuem was that it has on display the painting that has been my avatar here on GMG for the past several months (its painter's last completed work, inspired by a concert of the Domanie Musical). The impact this painting makes, with its monumental size (6 x 3.5 meters), is difficult to describe. It really is impressive.

Nicolas de Staël's Le concert:


Next came the Musée Jean Cocteau - Collection Séverin Wunderman in Menton. I didn't find Rudy Ricciotti's bulding particularly attractive, but the collection gives a good overview of Jean Cocteau's graphic and cinematographic output. Even if Cocteau's art can at moments appear frivolous and aimed exclusively at the fashionable circles of the society of its day, I must admit I have always been rather fond of it (and see his drwaings and his paintings as a sort of prolonged and stylized last expression of the Art Déco style).

The museum:


Part of the permanent display:


And last but not least, we had lunch at the mythical La Colombe d'Or (also in St.-Paul-de-Vence, and a place that once again brought back wonderful memories from many yaers ago). The food is unpretentious but very good, but it is the  setting that I'd venture to say has few equals in the world: the Roux family (which has owned the place for generations) managed to accumulate a world-class art colection that graces the walls and gardens of this restaurant and hotel. Having lunch in front of the magnificent Léger mural on the open-air terrrace is quite something!

The mural by Fernand Léger:


The Alexander Calder mobile by the pool:


This time around we missed, among other things, the Matisse and Chagall museums in Nice, and the Chapelle du Rosaire (with stained glass windows by Matisse) in Vence. On some other occasion... ;)
ritter
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« ...tout cela qui prend forme et solidité, est sorti, ville et jardins, de ma tasse de thé. »

North Star

"Everything has beauty, but not everyone sees it." - Confucius

My photographs on Flickr

Spineur

Indeed.  I have been to the Maeght foundation a couple of times, and the site is breathtaking.  It is some 5-600 m above the sea.  It dominates the coastline with the city which can just be seen below.

Vence, its chapel and the St Paul de Vence village are also beautiful, when they are not overrun by tourists.  I dont think I have seen this particular Picasso museum nor the Cocteau museum.