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Max Richter (1966 -)

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Hailed as the most influential composer of his generation, electro-acoustic polymath Max Richter defies definition: composer he may be, but he is also pianist, producer, remixer, and collaborator, and beyond argument one of the most prolific of contemporary musical artists.

Inspired equally by Bach, punk rock and ambient electronica, Richter’s sonic world blends a formal classical training (he graduated from the Royal Academy of Music, and was a pupil of renowned composer Luciano Berio) with modern technology. His unique and distinctive brand of heartbroken melodicism bridges the minimalist greats with pioneering electronics and the contemporary digital music production multiverse. Time Out has remarked on the ‘overwhelming emotional power’ of his work, the New Statesman has noted its ‘astonishing depth and beauty’ while Classic FM and Pitchfork have called it ‘stunning’ and The Guardian ‘languorously transcendent’.

Over the years Richter has become best known for his genre defining and highly influential solo albums which have given rise to and are seen as ‘landmarks’ (The Independent, Pitchfork) of the ever burgeoning ‘neo- classical’ movement, but his monumental collaborative output also encompasses concert music, operas, ballets, art and video installations, and multiple film, theatre and television scores.

The over 50 films featuring Max’s work and specifically written scores include Ari Folman’s multiple award-winning and devastating critique of war, Waltz with Bashir (for which Max was awarded the European Film Prize), Martin Scorsese’s Shutter Island and Damon Lindelof ’s first television project post-LOST, HBO’s The Leftovers. Theatre productions include Alan Cumming’s triumphant solo version of Macbeth on Broadway, and the National Theatre of Scotland’s internationally lauded Black Watch. Ballets include his many collaborative ventures with maverick Royal Ballet resident choreographer Wayne McGregor, with his works also being used by, amongst others, The Joffrey Ballet, Nederlands Dans Teatre, Lucinda Childs, New York City Ballet, American Ballet Theatre, Dutch National Ballet, Dresden Semper Oper, Ballet du Rhin, Northern Ballet.

Art Collaborations include work with photographer Darren Almond at the White Cube, with Julian Opie on McGregor’s ballet INFRA, and with visual art collective Random International on Rain Room at the Barbican and MoMA, and Future Self at Lunds Konsthall in Sweden.

Signed as an exclusive artist to Deutsche Grammophon, Max Richter’s projects for 2015 include his new solo album following on from his bestselling ‘Recomposed: Vivaldi’s Four Seasons’ for which he received the ECHO Klassik Award in 2013. In 2015 Max will also see the premiere of Woolf Works his new full length ballet for choreographer Wayne McGregor and The Royal Ballet at Covent Garden on the life and works of Virginia Woolf, which The Independent noted ‘looks set to be one of the most ambitious shows of the year’ and The Guardian forecasted to be ‘one of the highlights’ of the Opera House Season.

[Article taken from All Music Guide]

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No thread on Max Richter? ??? Well, I suppose it's not too surprising. Anyway, I'm not familiar with a lot of this composer's music, but I've certainly liked what I've heard: excerpts from The Blue Notebooks, Sleep, and 24 Postcards In Full Colour. I really have to say I love his lyrical, atmospheric approach to composition. I see that he's composed quite a number of film works as well. Not surprising. Any fans here?

vandermolen:
An admirer here.  :)
I first came across him as the composer of the music for the very sad film 'Sarah's Key'. I have The Blue Notebooks and Memory House. Both contain soulful, atmospheric music which I enjoy if I want something a bit different from my usual listening experiences.

Jo498:
I listened to some that Vivaldi "remix" a few years ago and I find it quite horrible. Not sure why an apparently otherwise serious composer would do something like that (except that it probably sells well...).

ComposerOfAvantGarde:
I have heard some of his music, but it was for film/tv rather than classical music. I was a little bit disappointed to find out that his non-soundtrack compositions come in pretty much the same style as his other stuff. The few excerpts I heard from 'Sleep' were particularly enjoyable for me but nothing I would listen to on a regular basis.

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--- Quote from: vandermolen on August 08, 2016, 09:33:03 PM ---An admirer here.  :)
I first came across him as the composer of the music for the very sad film 'Sarah's Key'. I have The Blue Notebooks and Memory House. Both contain soulful, atmospheric music which I enjoy if I want something a bit different from my usual listening experiences.

--- End quote ---

That's the great thing about composers like Richter (or Reich, Webern, Scelsi, etc.), they take you in directions you, otherwise, wouldn't have thought about and help give you an appreciation for something that's different than what we're normally accustomed to hearing.

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