Author Topic: Pieces that have blown you away recently  (Read 213204 times)

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Online André

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Re: Pieces that have blown you away recently
« Reply #1360 on: January 04, 2021, 06:32:01 AM »
Good to see some attention given to Revueltas. The best entry point into his music is the 2-disc set issued for the centenary year by RCA/BMG. Then there’s the Salonen Sony disc. His string quartets are rather special as well.

Offline Rosalba

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Re: Pieces that have blown you away recently
« Reply #1361 on: January 05, 2021, 08:23:37 AM »
Pergolesi, Magnificat in C Major.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RoW3cbXUGMo
Music is Magic.

Offline knight66

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Re: Pieces that have blown you away recently
« Reply #1362 on: January 11, 2021, 12:32:25 PM »


Braunfels gave a diminutive title to his 1948 symphony, an author’s caprice really, as the Sinfonia Brevis is anything but short (33 minutes) or small in scale. Cast in the regular 4 movements it packs a tremendous amount of symphonic weight and energy. Post-romantic and quasi atonal in places it is a more demanding piece than his other symphonic works. It felt at times as if Braunfels had uncovered the secret to Bruckner’s 9th finale, dissected it and recast in 4 different movements. It evokes that work’s vision of heaven, hell and the Great Beyond.

Thanks for the head’s up. I have just streamed it. Very enjoyable. I have The Birds and I bought his Requiem and thought it was a duffer. I will explore more of his orchestral music.
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Offline Symphonic Addict

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Re: Pieces that have blown you away recently
« Reply #1363 on: January 12, 2021, 03:39:07 PM »
The Norwegian Halvor Haug is the Stephen King of music. This is what I call truly haunting music, even terrifying at times, shattering at moments. Simply impressive. A master of suspense, of effects, of expectation, of drama, of conflict. It's severe, austere in a way, but oh boy, it's just terrific. The orchestration is inexorably bewitching, the daring and tonal harmony palette employed is felt by the handling of a remarkable composer. A symphonic mini-drama. It shares the icy feel to it
that one hears in Pettersson, albeit this is not as "depressing" or "intense". Heavily atmospheric is how I would describe this thoroughly spectacular symphony. There is granitic-like-music galore. 26 minutes (25:55 actually) of breathtaking atmosphere.

I can't recommend it enough.  A discovery of first rate category. The orchestra play it with full conviction. They breathe this composition.


« Last Edit: January 12, 2021, 03:41:09 PM by Symphonic Addict »
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Offline relm1

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Re: Pieces that have blown you away recently
« Reply #1364 on: January 12, 2021, 05:13:17 PM »
The Norwegian Halvor Haug is the Stephen King of music. This is what I call truly haunting music, even terrifying at times, shattering at moments. Simply impressive. A master of suspense, of effects, of expectation, of drama, of conflict. It's severe, austere in a way, but oh boy, it's just terrific. The orchestration is inexorably bewitching, the daring and tonal harmony palette employed is felt by the handling of a remarkable composer. A symphonic mini-drama. It shares the icy feel to it
that one hears in Pettersson, albeit this is not as "depressing" or "intense". Heavily atmospheric is how I would describe this thoroughly spectacular symphony. There is granitic-like-music galore. 26 minutes (25:55 actually) of breathtaking atmosphere.

I can't recommend it enough.  A discovery of first rate category. The orchestra play it with full conviction. They breathe this composition.




I agree and endorse him too!

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Pieces that have blown you away recently
« Reply #1365 on: February 02, 2021, 06:19:48 PM »
I have to say that many of the works I’ve heard lately from Hindemith and Schulhoff have blown me away. There is a remarkable consistency to both of these composers that make them great, IMHO. They are composers that I somehow have neglected in years past, although I’ve neglected Schulhoff far longer than Hindemith (with whom I knew a good bit of his music already).
“Competitions are for horses, not artists.”


Offline arpeggio

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Re: Pieces that have blown you away recently
« Reply #1366 on: February 04, 2021, 12:17:12 AM »
Very original tonal composer.  I met him when the Marine Band performed one of his works.  Piano Concerto blew me away..





Offline arpeggio

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Re: Pieces that have blown you away recently
« Reply #1367 on: February 04, 2021, 11:49:21 AM »
Purchase the following albums that contained music that blew me away.

The one really awesome work in the Maslanka album is Alex and the Phantom Band.  It is like a Young Person's Guide To the Band.  It contains some of the finest and original music I have heard from Maslanka.



The music here is a little grittier than other works I have heard from Lieberson like his Neruda Songs.



Anna Clyne is a new composer for me.  The 20th century has started to produce some fine women composers. 



 




Offline Symphonic Addict

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Re: Pieces that have blown you away recently
« Reply #1368 on: February 06, 2021, 04:59:03 PM »
Two really mind-blowing pieces this time:


1. Strauss: Preludio from Capriccio, for string sextet. The shortest way I could call this creation is: orgasm. A real orgasmic experience. But not an ordinary horny one. It's like having sex with the woman you love the most under the more exquisite and sensuous music writing in a moment of mutual communion between both actors. Music where tenderness, a real sense of loveliness can't be missed. It's melodically, harmonically and structurally satisfying and impressive. Not to mention the fine and natural transitions among its dfferent sections. It's a mini-masterpiece for sure.

It leads to think where Langgaard drew inspiration for his music for string quartet (in a significant part, of course). That sort of craftsmanship is to be found in the quartets 1, 4 and 5.


2. Debussy: Fantaisie for piano and orchestra. For me it's like a sinfonia concertante. The piano has a prominent role, but it's not "bigger" or more important than the orchestra. Both parts under a judicious and sensitive conductor. And all of that is obtained with Aldo Ciccolini on the piano, the Orchestre National de l'ORTF and Jean Martinon, provide a myriad of emotions beautifully conveyed. Debussy got strong inspiration to write such a fantastic (no pun intended) early masterpiece. Gorgeous to say the least.
«Music is liquid architecture; architecture is frozen music.»

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Offline Irons

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Re: Pieces that have blown you away recently
« Reply #1369 on: February 09, 2021, 02:04:01 AM »
Two really mind-blowing pieces this time:


1. Strauss: Preludio from Capriccio, for string sextet. The shortest way I could call this creation is: orgasm. A real orgasmic experience. But not an ordinary horny one. It's like having sex with the woman you love the most under the more exquisite and sensuous music writing in a moment of mutual communion between both actors. Music where tenderness, a real sense of loveliness can't be missed. It's melodically, harmonically and structurally satisfying and impressive. Not to mention the fine and natural transitions among its dfferent sections. It's a mini-masterpiece for sure.

It leads to think where Langgaard drew inspiration for his music for string quartet (in a significant part, of course). That sort of craftsmanship is to be found in the quartets 1, 4 and 5.


2. Debussy: Fantaisie for piano and orchestra. For me it's like a sinfonia concertante. The piano has a prominent role, but it's not "bigger" or more important than the orchestra. Both parts under a judicious and sensitive conductor. And all of that is obtained with Aldo Ciccolini on the piano, the Orchestre National de l'ORTF and Jean Martinon, provide a myriad of emotions beautifully conveyed. Debussy got strong inspiration to write such a fantastic (no pun intended) early masterpiece. Gorgeous to say the least.

After reading your post I discovered having a recording of Debussy's Fantaisie for Piano & Orchestra in a Debussy/Martinon LP box set. Thanks for heads up, I will give it a spin.
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Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Pieces that have blown you away recently
« Reply #1370 on: February 09, 2021, 07:44:35 AM »
After reading your post I discovered having a recording of Debussy's Fantaisie for Piano & Orchestra in a Debussy/Martinon LP box set. Thanks for heads up, I will give it a spin.

FWIW, Debussy’s Fantaisie is a decent early work, but I don’t find it particular noteworthy. I think it’s an attempt at a form that Debussy wasn’t either ready for yet or didn’t quite know how to get the music off the ground. I think works like Danse sacrée et danse profane or the Première rhapsodie are more successful examples of Debussy writing for a solo instrument with an orchestra. Of course, these works came later than the Fantaisie.
“Competitions are for horses, not artists.”


Offline Pohjolas Daughter

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Re: Pieces that have blown you away recently
« Reply #1371 on: February 09, 2021, 08:12:15 AM »
FWIW, Debussy’s Fantaisie is a decent early work, but I don’t find it particular noteworthy. I think it’s an attempt at a form that Debussy wasn’t either ready for yet or didn’t quite know how to get the music off the ground. I think works like Danse sacrée et danse profane or the Première rhapsodie are more successful examples of Debussy writing for a solo instrument with an orchestra. Of course, these works came later than the Fantaisie.
I found the Debussy in one of those EMI Icon boxsets:  the one of Walter Gieseking.



I don't know the Strauss sextet (looked also to see whether or not I had a recording of his Capriccio, but I don't alas :( ).

PD

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Pieces that have blown you away recently
« Reply #1372 on: February 09, 2021, 08:17:37 AM »
I found the Debussy in one of those EMI Icon boxsets:  the one of Walter Gieseking.



I don't know the Strauss sextet (looked also to see whether or not I had a recording of his Capriccio, but I don't alas :( ).

PD

Hmmm...I think this post is in response to SymphonicAddict’s post as I didn’t mention being blown away by the Debussy or the Strauss. ;)

Here’s his post:

Two really mind-blowing pieces this time:


1. Strauss: Preludio from Capriccio, for string sextet. The shortest way I could call this creation is: orgasm. A real orgasmic experience. But not an ordinary horny one. It's like having sex with the woman you love the most under the more exquisite and sensuous music writing in a moment of mutual communion between both actors. Music where tenderness, a real sense of loveliness can't be missed. It's melodically, harmonically and structurally satisfying and impressive. Not to mention the fine and natural transitions among its dfferent sections. It's a mini-masterpiece for sure.

It leads to think where Langgaard drew inspiration for his music for string quartet (in a significant part, of course). That sort of craftsmanship is to be found in the quartets 1, 4 and 5.


2. Debussy: Fantaisie for piano and orchestra. For me it's like a sinfonia concertante. The piano has a prominent role, but it's not "bigger" or more important than the orchestra. Both parts under a judicious and sensitive conductor. And all of that is obtained with Aldo Ciccolini on the piano, the Orchestre National de l'ORTF and Jean Martinon, provide a myriad of emotions beautifully conveyed. Debussy got strong inspiration to write such a fantastic (no pun intended) early masterpiece. Gorgeous to say the least.
“Competitions are for horses, not artists.”


Offline Pohjolas Daughter

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Re: Pieces that have blown you away recently
« Reply #1373 on: February 09, 2021, 08:21:05 AM »
You don't enjoy the Strauss work either?  I found it on youtube, but haven't had a chance to listen to it yet (getting ready to start shoveling).

Offline Symphonic Addict

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Re: Pieces that have blown you away recently
« Reply #1374 on: February 09, 2021, 08:39:41 AM »
You don't enjoy the Strauss work either?  I found it on youtube, but haven't had a chance to listen to it yet (getting ready to start shoveling).

That's an exquisite work, pure sensuousness. I can't recommend it enough. For those who believe that Strauss' music is trash, this sole piece should reconsider their thinking about him.

There is a version for string orchestra in various recordings. I need hear that too.
«Music is liquid architecture; architecture is frozen music.»

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

Offline Symphonic Addict

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Re: Pieces that have blown you away recently
« Reply #1375 on: February 09, 2021, 08:52:14 AM »
Well, I don't consider Debussy's Fantaisie a "decent" work at all. I even think it like much more cohesive or appealing than some of his other concertante pieces. It embodies a sort of late-Romantic Debussy. However, I come to think I don't enjoy the properly impressionist Debussy other than certain specific works. Perhaps it has to do with my personal view about the aforementioned composition.
«Music is liquid architecture; architecture is frozen music.»

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Pieces that have blown you away recently
« Reply #1376 on: February 09, 2021, 08:55:02 AM »
You don't enjoy the Strauss work either?  I found it on youtube, but haven't had a chance to listen to it yet (getting ready to start shoveling).

I mean it’s an ‘okay’ piece, but not top-drawer Strauss for me. The enthusiasms of our friend Cesar don’t match mine a lot of the times, although we do have some common interests here and there. I certainly have a better taste for Debussy than he does. ;)
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Offline Papy Oli

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Re: Pieces that have blown you away recently
« Reply #1377 on: February 10, 2021, 09:20:48 AM »
Ravel - Le Tombeau de Couperin

 :o
Olivier

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Re: Pieces that have blown you away recently
« Reply #1378 on: February 10, 2021, 09:23:57 AM »
Ravel - Le Tombeau de Couperin

 :o

The original for solo piano or the arrangement for orchestra or both?
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Offline ritter

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Re: Pieces that have blown you away recently
« Reply #1379 on: February 10, 2021, 09:24:47 AM »
Ravel - Le Tombeau de Couperin

 :o
Glad to read that, Olivier. Le tombeau de Couperin (piano and orchestral versions) is one of my favourite musical works of all time, in any genre...a stunning composition that touches perfection.

Good evening to you, cher Monsieur.
ritter
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