Author Topic: What are you currently reading?  (Read 851829 times)

0 Members and 2 Guests are viewing this topic.

Offline SimonNZ

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 7085
  • Location: Christchurch, NZ
Re: What are you currently reading?
« Reply #9620 on: January 11, 2020, 09:14:57 PM »

He also wrote a book about Mother Teresa that seems to just as hostile to her, if the fact that it was republished  in the same format as the others is a good indicator.


I've read what I think may have been the original magazine article version of the Mother Teresa thing in one of the anthologies of his journalism. He's not really hostile towards her - well, he sort of is, but in a roundabout way. He's more interested in the myth the world has made out of her due to some kind of need for a "Mother Teresa" figure, and how very different it is to the actual work she does and to her methods.

For some reason Hitchens' doesn't add the Clintons killing of Vince Foster (et al) to his list of charges - which can only be an oversight as he's happy to advance every other accusation sensible or silly, including being 100% all in on the "Wag The Dog" theory of the post-Monica wars.
« Last Edit: January 11, 2020, 09:36:07 PM by SimonNZ »

Offline SimonNZ

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 7085
  • Location: Christchurch, NZ
Re: What are you currently reading?
« Reply #9621 on: January 13, 2020, 03:57:47 PM »
Still going with Jack Reacher, but also started this today and pleased to find it very well written. The section near the beginning on the Curies was a model of potted biography and popular history:


Offline LKB

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1952
  • Location: USA
  • Currently Listening to:
    something between my ears
Re: What are you currently reading?
« Reply #9622 on: January 14, 2020, 10:19:53 AM »
Still going with Jack Reacher, but also started this today and pleased to find it very well written. The section near the beginning on the Curies was a model of potted biography and popular history:



Obliquely related:

https://books.google.com/books?id=T6PjIRx26FIC&printsec=frontcover&dq=inauthor:%22L.+Douglas+Keeney%22&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwid-cHZ2IPnAhW3GDQIHQmDCtoQ6AEIHTAA#v=onepage&q&f=false

I recommend 15 Minutes. For those too young to have memories of the most dangerous years of the Cold War, the book will be an eye - opener. The account of the Texas Towers alone makes the book worthwhile.

Duck and cover,

LKB
Mit Flügeln, die ich mir errungen...

Offline JBS

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 2747
  • If music be the food of love, play on!
  • Location: USA

Hollywood Beach Broadwalk

Offline AlberichUndHagen

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 44
  • Location: Helsinki
Re: What are you currently reading?
« Reply #9624 on: January 18, 2020, 10:23:46 AM »
RIP. Without Christopher we wouldn't have had Silmarillion (my favorite Tolkien book) or other posthumous works published except maybe much later.

Also continuing through latter segments of Proust's Swann's Way (the Finnish translation actually divides Swann's Way in 2 volumes, the first one is about the Combray section, I'm currently in vol 2 of Finnish translation which includes Swann in love and Names of places: the name). IIRC, the next two parts of original In Search of Lost Time (In the Budding Grove and Guermantes Way) are also divided in Finnish translation into 2 volumes each. So in translation this monumental work is 10 volumes in total.

Offline SimonNZ

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 7085
  • Location: Christchurch, NZ
Re: What are you currently reading?
« Reply #9625 on: January 18, 2020, 06:29:06 PM »
Halfway through Age Of Radiance but also knocked of this:



A very good deep dive into one pivotal year, corralling a lot of info you'd elsewhere find scattered across a number of volumes, along with the authors reexamination of contemporary reviews and interviews, and his own interviews with many of the Beatles inner circle.

from the back cover:

"The year that changed everything for the Beatles was 1966—the year of their last concert and Revolver, their first album of songs not intended for live performance. This was the year the Beatles risked their popularity by retiring from the tour circuit, recording songs that explored alternative states of consciousness, experimenting with avant-garde ideas, and speaking their minds on issues of politics, war, and religion. It was the year Americans burned their records after John’s explosive claim that the group was “more popular than Jesus,” the year they were hounded out of the Philippines for “snubbing” the country’s first lady, the year John met Yoko Ono, and the year Paul conceived the idea for Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band."
« Last Edit: January 18, 2020, 06:32:40 PM by SimonNZ »

Offline 2dogs

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 637
  • Location: Manchester UK
  • Currently Listening to:
    A Steinway and a xylophone falling in slow motion down endless flights of stairs
Re: What are you currently reading?
« Reply #9626 on: January 18, 2020, 09:04:12 PM »
Halfway through Age Of Radiance but also knocked of this:



A very good deep dive into one pivotal year, corralling a lot of info you'd elsewhere find scattered across a number of volumes, along with the authors reexamination of contemporary reviews and interviews, and his own interviews with many of the Beatles inner circle.

from the back cover:

"The year that changed everything for the Beatles was 1966—the year of their last concert and Revolver, their first album of songs not intended for live performance. This was the year the Beatles risked their popularity by retiring from the tour circuit, recording songs that explored alternative states of consciousness, experimenting with avant-garde ideas, and speaking their minds on issues of politics, war, and religion. It was the year Americans burned their records after John’s explosive claim that the group was “more popular than Jesus,” the year they were hounded out of the Philippines for “snubbing” the country’s first lady, the year John met Yoko Ono, and the year Paul conceived the idea for Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band."

Pop and rock music got so much more experimental and interesting that year after the Beatles picked up the studio sound manipulation techniques of 1950s/60s “classical” music.