Author Topic: Arthur Farwell  (Read 5144 times)

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Offline listener

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Re: Arthur Farwell
« Reply #20 on: November 01, 2009, 11:00:36 PM »
If vinyl is still an alternative, there's New World NW 213 that included
Three Indian Songs  op.32   - William Parker, bar.
Navajo War Dance and       
The Old Man's Love Song op.102  1&2      - New World Singers
Navajo War Dance (for piano) and Pawnee Horses     -Peter Basquin

+ Preston Wade Orem   American Indian Rhapsody    -Basquin
"Keep your hand on the throttle and your eye on the rail as you walk through life's pathway."

Offline schweitzeralan

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Re: Arthur Farwell
« Reply #21 on: November 02, 2009, 09:16:02 AM »
If vinyl is still an alternative, there's New World NW 213 that included
Three Indian Songs  op.32   - William Parker, bar.
Navajo War Dance and       
The Old Man's Love Song op.102  1&2      - New World Singers
Navajo War Dance (for piano) and Pawnee Horses     -Peter Basquin

+ Preston Wade Orem   American Indian Rhapsody    -Basquin

I believe you made a request foe some items. Your request got lost somewher as Iwas attempting to download information.  It became complicated.  I still don't know to forward a picture of te CD album yet. Just check on Amazon for the Farwell work.  He hs occasional "pianistic" mements, but he have been possessed by the deities when he composed "Gods of the Mountain." Sorry about the question loss, but tere are some technical details I have to master.

 Recordings of The Society for the Preservation of the American Musical Heritage, Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, Karl Krueger, conductor by Henry Hadley, Edward MacDowell, Victor Herbert, Horatio Parker, and Karl Krueger (Audio CD - 2003) - Box set
Buy new: $33.9910 Used & new from $27.97
Get it by Tuesday, Nov 3 if you order in the next 7 hours and choose one-day shipping.
E

Offline schweitzeralan

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Re: Arthur Farwell
« Reply #22 on: December 15, 2009, 10:51:21 AM »
This review of the box set might help-

http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2003/nov03/American1890.htm

All of the music is basically turn of the century rich American romanticism, heavily influenced by French impressionism and Russian nationalist romanticism.

Why don't you download the Farwell first and then decide if the idiom is appealing? The box set is quite an investment if you don't ;D

I do believe there existed a sort of rapprochement between the Russian cultural scene with that of the French at the beginning or early decades of the last century. a similarity existed between the German and the Spanish literary scene. I only wish the modes, harmonies colors , the general musical language of French and Russian composers were alive today.  Obviously, that will never be the case. Compositional styles, techniques, adumbrations exist, develop, and eventually pass on. There's nothing "wrong with successive styles.  But I do believe that by now Western music has exhausted itself.  Obviously its a long, involved topic; the forum has already addressed it in several treads.

cilgwyn

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Re: Arthur Farwell
« Reply #23 on: December 12, 2012, 02:24:21 PM »
I was just posting on the Henry Cowell thread & spotted this one,'tucked away',as it is! I actually bought that Bridge box set a few months ago & it's companion. I enjoyed everything on the cds (although the quality of the music varied).In fact,I enjoyed it so much I bought it's companion! Henry Hadley (also on Naxos) is particularly good & deserves some more recordings.
 These were obviously very adventurous releases in their day & I suppose it's a little sad that,even in this age of cd re-discoveries,Arthur Farwell is still as neglected as ever!

Right,I'm going to switch of Mendelssohn,now & 'dig' those Bridge cds out! :)

cilgwyn

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Re: Arthur Farwell
« Reply #24 on: December 12, 2012, 03:01:26 PM »
Found it! :) Cd2 of the 3cd set begins with 'Vathek',a tone poem by Horatio Parker (1863-1919) Of course,I shouldn't bring this into an Arthur Farwell thread,but this is b***** great,albeit,if you like you're tone poems,floridly late romantic! :) It reminds me of Bantock. Colourful orchestration,lots of atmosphere,stirring themes & allot better than Bantock's 'Thalabba'! Fun! Escapist! Love it!
Herbert's 'Hero & Leander' follows,then the Arthur Farwell 'The Gods of the Mountain Suite'. With sound & playing as good as this,I can't wait! :)

Grrrrrreeeat!!! :) :) :)

cilgwyn

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Re: Arthur Farwell
« Reply #25 on: December 12, 2012, 03:37:31 PM »
After Victor Herbert's gorgeously scored 'Hero & Leander' I'm finally onto Farwell's 'The Gods of the Mountain Suite'. A wonderfully mysterious opening and,well,I haven't heard all of it yet!
One of the delights of this set is the standard of playing. Naxos's American Classics series,take note! What a splendid late romantic feast! :) To think I left this lot lying in a box!! More fool me,eh?! ??? ::) ;D

Wooh-hooh! This Farwell suite sounds fantastic! If any of the rest of his output is as good as this will someone please record it!! But no crummy,unprepared orchestra's please. This is how it should be done! :)

Lovely! :) :)
« Last Edit: December 12, 2012, 03:41:43 PM by cilgwyn »

cilgwyn

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Re: Arthur Farwell
« Reply #26 on: March 23, 2017, 06:35:40 AM »
Another relatively unknown composer during the early decades of the 20th century.  I recently purchased a box set which included works by the well known McDowel, Horatio Parker, Henry Hadley, Victor Herbert (Why He? I asked myself), and Farwell's amazing "Gods of the Mountain." I did a little research on Farwell and was accordingly informed that he was totally interested in American Indian culture and wrote much music on that subject. Most are vocal, short works. The "Gods of the Mountain" is perhaps the only orchestral, three movement dramatic composition Farwell conceived.  Its a wonderful, dramatic, early 20th century tonal piece that seems to embrace the listener. If only he had written more symphonic works in this vein.
I like the "Gods of the Mountain". (the MacDowell Suites aside) I loved that Bridge set when I first got it (the MacDowell Suites aside) but my enthusiasm has since cooled to some of the music. The Farwell is one of the best in the set. I find the approach of the Gods quite creepy. I wouldn't want to listen to it late at night with the lights turned off!! ??? ??? ??? To be fair,this was obviously a very enterprising release in it's day.