Author Topic: Myers Briggs  (Read 3814 times)

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Offline greg

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Re: Myers Briggs
« Reply #40 on: November 17, 2020, 12:32:43 PM »
8 question test for enneagram tritype.

http://enneagramuserguide.com/enneagram-tests/tritype-wing

The idea is to separate the Head, Heart, and Gut and find one out of the three types for each. Then order it based on priority.




My tritype, after taking the quiz and reading some descriptions, seems to be 5 4 1.

Pretty cool to know this, was wondering which it would be, 8, 9, or 1? But feeling very confident now about it being 1.

It can be a bit tricky to get a description, but if anyone took this quiz I could do some research for ya.
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Offline greg

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Re: Myers Briggs
« Reply #41 on: November 17, 2020, 02:20:38 PM »
You know, I kinda think it's better to ignore the silly rules and just read about all the types and then put them in order from most comfortable to least comfortable.

For me:
5 4 1 7 8 6 9 3 2


For type 2 those people would be butlers, waiters or nurses, the most undesirable jobs IMO.

The attention to detail, receptivity to customers and gentleness needed would be undoable for me.

Here's what being a professional waiter at a fancy Japanese restaurant looks like. Watching it makes me want to go to the kitchen and smash dishes, it's almost painful to imagine having to do this stuff.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qqVHHTQco_A&t=739s

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Offline greg

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Re: Myers Briggs
« Reply #42 on: November 19, 2020, 01:33:54 PM »
I kinda have a suspicion that you could make some sort of visual model out of this:

5 4 1 7 8 6 9 3 2
Like, say, the first two numbers are auto-pilot, unconscious behavior, your comfort zone.

Then the next 5 are things that are doable, personas you can adopt, or masks you can wear in order to succeed at some goal. It's the conscious mind. It takes some energy away, but its doable.

And the last two are like the Jungian shadow, encompassing behaviors which are very hard to even imitate, and basically impossible to actually be.

I can see type 3 as well being impossible for me, it is the archetype of the image-conscious corporate businessman, something I can't even pretend to be. Though it is not quite as bad as type 2. These types relate alot to the extroverted decider functions, Fe and Te, a lot, IMO, and even in MBTI they call that your shadow if they are your shadow functions.
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Offline greg

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Re: Myers Briggs
« Reply #43 on: November 27, 2020, 06:23:41 PM »
No one wants to take the enneagram quiz, I see  :'(

Btw, I have discovered the best one thanks to someone sharing it today. Would recommend this one above the others.

(attached image)

https://www.eclecticenergies.com/enneagram/test-2


Pretty fascinating how consistent my results are, despite taking many different versions of the test.

(Btw, maybe I have misunderstood what type 3 is, who knows).


Got mom and brother to take it, mom is type 3 by far with nothing else even close, brother is by far type 9 but also somewhat of type 6...
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Offline greg

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Re: Myers Briggs
« Reply #44 on: November 29, 2020, 12:27:54 PM »
Best description of Enneagram Type 4 summarized found in a youtube comment:

Quote
I sometimes envy how everyone seems to have a place or purpose in the world. No matter how hard I try, I never feel like I fit in or "get it". It's like the world had a meeting about how to belong and I missed it....probably because I was in bed and didn't care to go....but still, I missed it! Lol, smh.

This is why people type Mahler as Type 4, 100% him lol.
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Offline greg

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Re: Myers Briggs
« Reply #45 on: November 29, 2020, 09:48:29 PM »
Kinda feeling like the idea of "unhealthy Type 5" is the best description I've heard yet of what was going on in the past for me, during the worst years. Something I could describe but hardly anyone would understand.

Type 5 basically needs to master skills, that is their fundamental drive. It may be knowledge, the environment, crafts, anything.

If this need isn't being met, Type 5 will behave like an "unhealthy Type 7 (The Enthusiast)," by being extremely scattered and looking everywhere for mental stimulation to keep from being bored.

Working in a dead-end retail job was the worst, there was nothing to learn at all, just doing the same stuff all the time like a robot. It was like wasting my life away. So while at home, my routine was endlessly websurfing, trying to find some interesting spark to prevent feeling like a literal nihilistic zombie.

Would have been nice if enneagram was common knowledge and I could just tell people that I'm a 5 having an existential meltdown for years because I have nothing interesting enough to get good at, and then would be understood. But that never happened.
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Offline greg

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Re: Myers Briggs
« Reply #46 on: December 03, 2020, 12:06:48 PM »


http://www.9types.com/rheti/stats.html

Enneagram types by gender

Type 5 (the STEM) type... yeah, these stats basically demonstrate the gender difference in STEM. Way more women taking this test, yet still, it's the only type where there are more men still. LOL.

Type 2 is like the nurse type... so yeah, you can get the picture here.

If someone wanted to believe gender roles are linked to biology, then they'd have to convince people that the enneagram and other such typology tests are entirely linked to cultural beliefs instead of one's natural personality.
I can say that moving from a Type 2 customer service job to a Type 5 STEM job preventing me from jumping off a cliff, and had nothing to do with asserting my gender role or whatever, some things just come natural to people and some things don't...

edit:
ended up taking the test on that site as well


Type 1   5
Type 2   1
Type 3   6
Type 4   6
Type 5   7
Type 6   2
Type 7   3
Type 8   3
Type 9       3

Same results as other quizzes, this means 5w4, 541 tritype as well...
only difference compared to other quizzes is scoring unusually high on Type 3 for this quiz.
« Last Edit: December 03, 2020, 12:16:23 PM by greg »
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Offline greg

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Re: Myers Briggs/Enneagram
« Reply #47 on: December 04, 2020, 11:43:20 AM »
Well, guess this thread is more of a documentation of my discoveries with the enneagram at the moment, anyone can comment still if they like.

This can be used in place of taking a test. Read these, and decide what hits hard?

Quote
Type 1. There is a right way; let me show you how.
Type 2. If those I love are happy then so am I.
Type 3. My worth depends on what I do.
Type 4. Feelings and being authentic are most important.
Type 5. I can only rely on myself.
Type 6. Feeling connected allows me to feel more safe.
Type 7. Life is a banquet; explore it.
Type 8. You have to be strong to survive.
Type 9. Every point of view has value.

Yeah, Type 5 hits hard for me, secondarily 4, so this is most likely pretty accurate for the other types as well.
And 9, 6 and 2 don't hit at all for me, and this is what's cool about the enneagram... in other typing systems, my brother types similarly to me, but in this is he is practically the opposite. So there's so much to learn when learning new typology systems.

Also supporting I have a bit of a Type 1 in me, was how I think people are dumb for not putting up their shopping carts. Seriously, it just takes a few seconds to put it up, you are creating more work for the worker getting the carts, wth is wrong with people?

I feel like Japan might be a Type 1 society predominantly. Like a 145, which is my triad but backwards (541). It's a very perfectionistic country.
(another example- in online video games, there were examples where Japanese people will form an orderly line while westerners just form a crowd for the same thing, it's hilarious actually).

I know you could argue they aren't 4 because of being known as a collectivist society, and they nail/hammer saying that they have, but to me it's just all talk. If they were truly anti-individualist, they wouldn't have an explosion of creative force that's probably stronger than any other country apart from the US. I think what you are seeing is just Type 1 tendencies being anti-individualist, clashing with itself to create the impression of a contradiction, though it isn't, it's really just a complex thing to understand.
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Re: Myers Briggs
« Reply #48 on: December 04, 2020, 11:34:53 PM »
These tests aren’t conclusive and have as much weight as reading what your zodiac sign actually means. Simply a waste of time.

You are completely wrong. The main thing is to get the tests done properly. If they are done properly they are remarkable in the assessment of personality. One problem is that people try and get them done on the cheap off the Internet or something. You need the proper assessment papers and they do cost

Offline steve ridgway

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Re: Myers Briggs
« Reply #49 on: December 05, 2020, 09:03:37 AM »
I don’t like doing all these tests, they just confuse and distract me. But this one jumps out of your list -

Type 5. I can only rely on myself.
“Nature does not know extinction; all it knows is transformation” - Wernher von Braun

Offline greg

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Re: Myers Briggs
« Reply #50 on: December 05, 2020, 12:01:36 PM »
You are completely wrong. The main thing is to get the tests done properly. If they are done properly they are remarkable in the assessment of personality. One problem is that people try and get them done on the cheap off the Internet or something. You need the proper assessment papers and they do cost
Maybe John has changed his opinion slightly over the last 3 years?

But yeah, getting assessment by people that either made the typing system or is heavily involved in it helps more. The one assessment I got before was from the creators of the Objective Personality system, which takes the Myers Briggs ideas and expands them a lot. My guess was super close, highly statistically unlikely since their system has 512 types. So I'd add that some people (not most people) might know themselves well enough to give a good guess, as well.


I don’t like doing all these tests, they just confuse and distract me. But this one jumps out of your list -

Type 5. I can only rely on myself.
Cool!
Yeah, I catch myself doing that all the time...
examples: teaching myself how to do apartment repairs even though I could just call maintenance and get stuff fixed, in online games I will always do stuff by myself if possible rather than join up with others, my album that I'm working on I'm teaching myself how to mix/master rather than send it to professionals (yeah i know, a HIGHLY discouraged thing to do but I want 100% control of everything).

The knowledge that could be used later and knowing that I did something entirely myself without relying on others feels very good.
It is also the feeling of not wanting to owe or be owed anything... that's why they call type 5 the most detached type.

If you get any more interest, you can try to figure out what your wing and triad is. That can be fun but at the same time more difficult and requires a lot of insight and self-observation.
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Offline steve ridgway

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Re: Myers Briggs
« Reply #51 on: December 06, 2020, 05:37:50 AM »
teaching myself how to mix/master rather than send it to professionals

Great idea, you should be able to manage this now it’s all done with software although you might need a range of speakers and headphones to check it with. Comparative listening against commercial releases may help.
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Offline greg

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Re: Myers Briggs
« Reply #52 on: December 06, 2020, 11:27:10 AM »
Great idea, you should be able to manage this now it’s all done with software although you might need a range of speakers and headphones to check it with. Comparative listening against commercial releases may help.
Right, not to mention acoustic room treatment and good studio monitors.

Actually built some of the panels, never did anything like that before with woodworking but was better than waiting for shipments of what I needed, and also wanted to learn how to do that myself anyways (so yeah, another example of that lol...).

The comparative listening seems to be mostly a mastering phase thing, I've looked into it and it is a weird thing, compared to the mixing process it is barely any work at all, but at the same time, the skill level can be high with professionals. So, unlike the mixing process, if I'm not satisfied with my own mastering, I may send it over to a pro as a backup plan.
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Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Myers Briggs
« Reply #53 on: December 06, 2020, 12:24:51 PM »
I think this whole Myers Briggs method of equating personality types is complete BS much like the whole idea of the Zodiac is BS. It boils down to one thing in the end: are you a decent person? Because if you’re not, then more chances than not, you’ll be on the receiving end on whatever kind of pain it is you caused someone else.
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Offline greg

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Re: Myers Briggs
« Reply #54 on: December 06, 2020, 07:54:30 PM »
I think this whole Myers Briggs method of equating personality types is complete BS much like the whole idea of the Zodiac is BS.
Why even say this if you don't explain why, this is literally the type of comment you see on political threads. You don't have to like it (actually I'm starting to like other typing systems much more than Myers Briggs nowadays), but saying it's BS without explaining is just... why?

There's a reason why I don't get into Zodiac signs at all but get into typing systems. It's not 100% accurate stuff, but can be revealing.


It boils down to one thing in the end: are you a decent person? Because if you’re not, then more chances than not, you’ll be on the receiving end on whatever kind of pain it is you caused someone else.
Yeah, but that's obvious and boring. Typing systems are fun. I don't care much about focusing on people, they are just examples to understand the system.
It's very helpful to think about systems, anyways, if you are the type of person who always has several trains of thought going on at the same time... otherwise my tendency is to focus on existential depression, and fun stuff like this helps me avoid those thoughts.
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Offline greg

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Myers Briggs/Enneagram
« Reply #55 on: December 06, 2020, 09:43:15 PM »


Combining two systems gives more information.

Example, my types:
5w4 in enneagram
INTP usually in MBTI, but there is some flexibility in T and P, so I'd rather say for sure, INxx, but that doesn't give much information...

If you add the two together it makes more sense. INFJ, INFP, INTJ, INTP are the four predominant corresponding types for enneagram Type 5 and 4...
So basically INxx = 5w4 or 4w5.

I like to think of 5w4 as a fusion of goth and nerd (going by high school groups, that concept I sort of briefly mentioned in regards to neurotyping). Aka sciences/arts.

Whereas something like 5w6 is more of a pure nerd, for example Bill Gates and Elon Musk are typed this way. It corresponds to IxTx in MBTI. Aka just hard sciences.



side note: not sure if my enneagram subtype is sp/sx or sx/sp (self-preservation or sexual). It's definitely not so (social), though.
might just be one of those things, if they are so close, then they are both sorta applicable, in the same way that I could just as well be 4w5 as 5w4, all typing is an approximation anyways so there is no measurable and specific answer.
« Last Edit: December 06, 2020, 09:57:21 PM by greg »
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Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Myers Briggs
« Reply #56 on: December 06, 2020, 10:00:10 PM »
Why even say this if you don't explain why, this is literally the type of comment you see on political threads. You don't have to like it (actually I'm starting to like other typing systems much more than Myers Briggs nowadays), but saying it's BS without explaining is just... why?

There's a reason why I don't get into Zodiac signs at all but get into typing systems. It's not 100% accurate stuff, but can be revealing.

Yeah, but that's obvious and boring. Typing systems are fun. I don't care much about focusing on people, they are just examples to understand the system.
It's very helpful to think about systems, anyways, if you are the type of person who always has several trains of thought going on at the same time... otherwise my tendency is to focus on existential depression, and fun stuff like this helps me avoid those thoughts.

Why is this system BS? It’s pretty simple: no system can begin to measure the basis of a person’s personality. If you’re having issues with depression perhaps it’s time to figure out why you’re depressed and worry less about these kinds of things? There is no such thing as a healthy diversion, especially when your own health in on the line. Avoidance is exactly what you shouldn’t be doing at this juncture. I really hope you get help or ask someone for help if you truly feel depressed. It will only get worse if you don’t figure out why you’re feeling the way you do.
« Last Edit: December 06, 2020, 10:01:58 PM by Mirror Image »
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Offline greg

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Re: Myers Briggs
« Reply #57 on: December 07, 2020, 08:46:49 AM »
If a system can't measure it, then words can't either. So you might as well go the rest of your life never using any words to describe a person. Systems are just a bunch of words summed up as shorthand code.
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Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Myers Briggs
« Reply #58 on: December 07, 2020, 11:13:50 AM »
If a system can't measure it, then words can't either. So you might as well go the rest of your life never using any words to describe a person. Systems are just a bunch of words summed up as shorthand code.

If creating diversions instead of tackling your own mental problems is what gets you going, then, by all means, continue.
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Offline greg

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Re: Myers Briggs
« Reply #59 on: December 07, 2020, 11:45:34 AM »
If creating diversions instead of tackling your own mental problems is what gets you going, then, by all means, continue.
Diversions are the solution to that. Focus on the the worst things in your life that you can't fix... maybe not a good idea, right?
You can't fix it, so why think about it? Think about something else. That's the point.
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