Author Topic: Bach on the piano  (Read 183214 times)

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Handelian

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Re: Bach on the piano
« Reply #980 on: November 15, 2020, 01:39:55 PM »
In fact I was thinking of concerts really when I wrote that, all the dud recitals and operas I’ve been to!

I’ve been to a few duds but far more which are at least enjoyable.

Offline (: premont :)

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Re: Bach on the piano
« Reply #981 on: November 15, 2020, 03:15:56 PM »
But in mainstream classical music I bet it doesn’t happen much. I have a collection of Sviatoslav Richter bootleg recordings and the performances are really consistent. And he is, by reputation at least, one of the better musicians. That’s why classical music is so rarely fresh sounding, it’s so often more like a ritual.

We once talked about this before, there was a quotation by Colin Carr that I found. He is probably an exception.

I can not deny that there are musicians who maintain a very static image of the music they play, and who try to reach this ideal at every performance - or recording. I have not heard enough of Sviatoslav Richter's live recordings to be able to say quite a lot about him, apart from the fact that his studio WTC does not differ significantly from his live Salzburg recording, but they are from almost the same period. Other musicians with fairly consistent interpretations could be Backhaus (e.g. his many opus 106) and Karl Richter and Helmut Walcha.

But I think that a large part of classical musicians make room for a certain spontaneity in their live interpretations, which you can get an impression of by comparing studio recordings with live performances or if you have been present at concerts. Two examples from my concert experience: Wilhelm Kempff e.g. chose a faster pace for the finale of op. 57 than in any of his recordings making the movement even wilder. A few notes fell to the ground, but that was completely unimportant. Another example was Walter Kraft, who succeeded in making Buxtehudes d-minor toccata and Bach's BWV 548 far more extatic than his recordings.

The thought that a work must be created anew is of course most actual when it's about live recitals.

But if two studio recordings by the same musician of the same work made with an interval of more years differ much, we use to say, that the musician has changed his view upon the work.
It's better to act today than to regret tomorrow.
(Mette Frederiksen)

Online Mandryka

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Re: Bach on the piano
« Reply #982 on: November 16, 2020, 01:08:25 AM »
Where there is creativity in abundance it can easily topple over into anarchy.  Some such people are simply incapable of repeating themselves.

Gould is an example I think. I listened to his Chopin sonata a few days ago. This is an anarchic interpretation.

Turning and turning in the widening gyre   
The falcon cannot hear the falconer;
Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold;
Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world,
The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere   
The ceremony of innocence is drowned;
The best lack all conviction, while the worst   
Are full of passionate intensity.
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Handelian

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Re: Bach on the piano
« Reply #983 on: November 16, 2020, 02:21:08 AM »
Gould is an example I think. I listened to his Chopin sonata a few days ago. This is an anarchic interpretation.

Turning and turning in the widening gyre   
The falcon cannot hear the falconer;
Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold;
Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world,
The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere   
The ceremony of innocence is drowned;
The best lack all conviction, while the worst   
Are full of passionate intensity.

More like Stravinsky than Chopin.

Offline hvbias

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Re: Bach on the piano
« Reply #984 on: December 12, 2020, 01:09:31 PM »
Dina Ugorskaja's latest release, the 15 Inventions are absolutely fabulous. I've also had her recordings of WTC in my heavy rotation and these are also superb, particularly Book 2 but mentioning the 15 Inventions specifically because it just came out recently.

I haven't even got to the Chopin Preludes yet as I've been doing some comparisons among different performances with the Nocturnes and Preludes and want to take a break from them, but I more than got my penny's worth from the 15 Inventions.

I hope Avie has many more of her recordings in the vault.

« Last Edit: December 12, 2020, 01:53:04 PM by hvbias »

Offline milk

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Re: Bach on the piano
« Reply #985 on: December 15, 2020, 03:18:09 AM »


I'm just going back over things that were kind of missed but shouldn't necessarily be forgotten. Here's Levin, who recorded WTC sets that I love, though don't necessarily recommend to everyone. Levin is interesting for his work on period instruments, I think. I like these partitas of his better this time around. His main means of adding expression is ornamentation. That can wear a little thin sometimes. Maybe better in small doses? He's rather fast and stiff (place joke here). But he's interesting still. 

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Re: Bach on the piano
« Reply #986 on: December 15, 2020, 04:29:09 AM »

I'm just going back over things that were kind of missed but shouldn't necessarily be forgotten. Here's Levin, who recorded WTC sets that I love, though don't necessarily recommend to everyone. Levin is interesting for his work on period instruments, I think. I like these partitas of his better this time around. His main means of adding expression is ornamentation. That can wear a little thin sometimes. Maybe better in small doses? He's rather fast and stiff (place joke here). But he's interesting still.

I suppose the style of his recording of the partitas doesn't differ much from his recording of the English suites. If so is the case I'll pass them by - already being very little keen on Bach on modern piano.
It's better to act today than to regret tomorrow.
(Mette Frederiksen)

Offline milk

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Re: Bach on the piano
« Reply #987 on: December 16, 2020, 05:19:20 AM »
I suppose the style of his recording of the partitas doesn't differ much from his recording of the English suites. If so is the case I'll pass them by - already being very little keen on Bach on modern piano.
I think it’s more for people specifically looking for something different on the piano. He’s not really like anyone else that I can think of. Maybe a little like Magregor. But generally, in comparison to all that’s out there, he’s not a priority. But he does do something different.

Offline milk

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Re: Bach on the piano
« Reply #988 on: January 05, 2021, 06:26:40 AM »

I just listened to a sample of this and I'm surprised that I like what I heard. The review I read, though laudatory, threw up red flags for my tastes with the use of words like "pulse" and "percussive." I look out for certain descriptors that usually mean I won't like it but this might be a different case. It's just released so I could only hear one prelude/fugue pair but he does something interesting with articulation and pace. I'm looking forward to the whole thing and I might check out his partitas and other Bach sets. 

Offline SonicMan46

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Re: Bach on the piano
« Reply #989 on: January 05, 2021, 06:51:47 AM »


I'm just going back over things that were kind of missed but shouldn't necessarily be forgotten. Here's Levin, who recorded WTC sets that I love, though don't necessarily recommend to everyone. Levin is interesting for his work on period instruments, I think. I like these partitas of his better this time around. His main means of adding expression is ornamentation. That can wear a little thin sometimes. Maybe better in small doses? He's rather fast and stiff (place joke here). But he's interesting still.

Just wanted to see the pic -  8)

Offline milk

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Re: Bach on the piano
« Reply #990 on: January 05, 2021, 07:18:01 AM »
Just wanted to see the pic -  8)
sorry for the crazy big!