Author Topic: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread  (Read 188231 times)

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Online Mandryka

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Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
« Reply #920 on: August 23, 2020, 06:29:51 AM »
A great online recital given by Peter van der Zwaag on the rarely heard 1663 Father Smith organ in Edam. It makes some really delicate and ravishing sounds that are to die for!
Especially enjoyed the Willam Byrd Ut re mi and Bach at the end.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uGDb17Ijet4

Very good -- I wonder if he says anything specially interesting between the tracks.
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Offline bioluminescentsquid

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Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
« Reply #921 on: August 23, 2020, 09:48:42 AM »
Very good -- I wonder if he says anything specially interesting between the tracks.
It's all double dutch to me.
Of course, Edam is also the butt of that cheesy joke I won't repeat here.

Good essay about this organ, if you haven't seen it: https://www.albany.edu/piporg-l/edam.html
I've never heard of anyone who actually tried to peddle the idea of "tonal maturation" when it comes to organs, though, so I'm not sure why Bicknell felt the need to argue so strongly against it.
« Last Edit: August 23, 2020, 09:59:08 AM by bioluminescentsquid »

Offline André Le Nôtre

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Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
« Reply #922 on: August 24, 2020, 06:06:41 PM »
It's all double dutch to me.
Of course, Edam is also the butt of that cheesy joke I won't repeat here.


What about Venezuelan beaver cheese?

???

Have you got any cheese at all (he said expecting the answer 'no')?


Offline bioluminescentsquid

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Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
« Reply #923 on: August 29, 2020, 07:10:20 PM »


Just looking at the tracklist, lots of seldom-recorded Sweelinckian stuff primarily from the Lüneburg organ tabulature (from which we get most of our surviving music of Scheidemann, Weckmann etc.) intersperced with more familiar beauties from the usual suspects.

I am listening to the Praetorius Magnificat which I've actually played before (the first verse is a classic "Hamburg style" plainchant setting in which you play the cantus on the upper of the 2 voices of the pedal and double it as the lowest voice in the hands - Weckmann also does this somewhat often) and it is clear and relaxed, possibly a bit too relaxed. But extremely inventive playing. I have to listen more.

And of course, the excellent Stellwagen organ is well-known in this neighborhood :)

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=OLAK5uy_nPJwSsgemzg9J2xg7IQ1HyUQHV0d5O3Kk


Edit: a nice video-trailer to this disc https://vimeo.com/341527492
Captures the paradoxically grand-yet-intimate atmosphere of St. Jakobi Lübeck, scarcely half the size but having two organs of almost comparable size to those at the Marienkirche.
« Last Edit: August 29, 2020, 07:29:02 PM by bioluminescentsquid »

Offline bioluminescentsquid

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Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
« Reply #924 on: August 30, 2020, 08:56:53 PM »


Friedhelm Flamme playing Buxtehude, also a recent release. I've always had the impression that Flamme was a rather wishy-washy performer who often inexplicably decided to record on "wrong" organs. (e.g. Lübeck on a Central German organ, Praetorius on a boring 19th century organ etc.) His Schildt and to a lesser degree, Jacob Praetorius has proved me wrong, but this one is really, really good.

Bold, unnuanced but captivating playing, and of course a wide variety of registrations to show off the not-quite-authentic but still wonderful 1734 Treutmann organ.
A major highlight is his breathtaking e minor chaconne, which he plays on the full organ with the deep 32' reed thrown in for good measure. It has all the subtlety of a dancing herd of elephants and I absolutely love it - the chaconne has never made sense to me until now. (after all, these 18th century ostinato pieces were generally considered to be festive pieces for full organ and the modern love for kaleidoscopic registrational changes really is an anachronism)
The chorales, while delivered in a rather deadpan and straightforward manner, also sound well with lots of interesting registrations.

Offline "Harry"

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Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
« Reply #925 on: August 30, 2020, 10:56:24 PM »


Friedhelm Flamme playing Buxtehude, also a recent release. I've always had the impression that Flamme was a rather wishy-washy performer who often inexplicably decided to record on "wrong" organs. (e.g. Lübeck on a Central German organ, Praetorius on a boring 19th century organ etc.) His Schildt and to a lesser degree, Jacob Praetorius has proved me wrong, but this one is really, really good.

Bold, unnuanced but captivating playing, and of course a wide variety of registrations to show off the not-quite-authentic but still wonderful 1734 Treutmann organ.
A major highlight is his breathtaking e minor chaconne, which he plays on the full organ with the deep 32' reed thrown in for good measure. It has all the subtlety of a dancing herd of elephants and I absolutely love it - the chaconne has never made sense to me until now. (after all, these 18th century ostinato pieces were generally considered to be festive pieces for full organ and the modern love for kaleidoscopic registrational changes really is an anachronism)
The chorales, while delivered in a rather deadpan and straightforward manner, also sound well with lots of interesting registrations.

Good for you, Flamme irritates me no end with his pedantic style of playing, missing a lot of the details, by making the organ sound like the landing of a Boeing 777 ER. Subtlety is not one of his strong points. In fact I find him a mediocre organist!
There comes a point in your life when you realize: Who matters, Who never did, Who won't anymore, And who always will. So, don't worry about people from your past, there's a reason why they didn't make it to your future.

Online Mandryka

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Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
« Reply #926 on: August 30, 2020, 11:57:10 PM »


Friedhelm Flamme playing Buxtehude, also a recent release. I've always had the impression that Flamme was a rather wishy-washy performer who often inexplicably decided to record on "wrong" organs. (e.g. Lübeck on a Central German organ, Praetorius on a boring 19th century organ etc.) His Schildt and to a lesser degree, Jacob Praetorius has proved me wrong, but this one is really, really good.

Bold, unnuanced but captivating playing, and of course a wide variety of registrations to show off the not-quite-authentic but still wonderful 1734 Treutmann organ.
A major highlight is his breathtaking e minor chaconne, which he plays on the full organ with the deep 32' reed thrown in for good measure. It has all the subtlety of a dancing herd of elephants and I absolutely love it - the chaconne has never made sense to me until now. (after all, these 18th century ostinato pieces were generally considered to be festive pieces for full organ and the modern love for kaleidoscopic registrational changes really is an anachronism)
The chorales, while delivered in a rather deadpan and straightforward manner, also sound well with lots of interesting registrations.

Thanks, listening to the chaconne now. Who could resist a heard of elephants?
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Offline bioluminescentsquid

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Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
« Reply #927 on: August 31, 2020, 12:07:23 AM »
Thanks, listening to the chaconne now. Who could resist a heard of elephants?

Is "heard" a pun? :)

For those craving more elephants, I present to you Sietze de Vries having fun with Praetorius on Reincken's organ.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xuS58-IeZBY

Online Mandryka

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Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
« Reply #928 on: August 31, 2020, 01:36:54 AM »
Is "heard" a pun? :)

For those craving more elephants, I present to you Sietze de Vries having fun with Praetorius on Reincken's organ.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xuS58-IeZBY

Of course. In hindsight.
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Offline bioluminescentsquid

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Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
« Reply #929 on: September 20, 2020, 11:22:33 AM »


A very nice recording on the recently reconstructed organ in Trinity church of Gdansk, what is a complete reconstruction of an 18th century Polish organ in a highly elaborate original 17th century case, reassembled after being whisked away to safety from falling bombs in WWII. (I think these old Polish organ cases are some of the most beautiful ever made - shame that a lot have since been destroyed, or no longer contain their original innards) Lots of different music, we have everything from Frescobaldi, Sweelinck, to early Bach (bwv 561) without feeling too much like this is someone's dissertation recital. Andrzej Szadejko playing is good, with a lot of "drive," and he also gives us lots of opportunities to hear the different stops of the newly-minted organ.

The last track is a jolly mash-up, so to say, of Bach's and Buxtehude's passacaglias, by a certain "Andreas Nicholas Shade" :) Really worth hearing!
« Last Edit: September 20, 2020, 11:43:59 AM by bioluminescentsquid »