Author Topic: What are you currently reading?  (Read 1266632 times)

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Offline aligreto

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Re: What are you currently reading?
« Reply #12000 on: July 05, 2022, 11:45:26 PM »
E. Bronte: Wuthering Heights





The opening section of this novel very well depicts a harsh, brutal, wild and intemperate environment.  And so it is with the introduction of the occupants of Wuthering Heights at the time. This portentous opening sets the tone for the tale that will ultimately be told. This is a re-read after decades and I did not remember the extent of the barbaric brutality that was contained in large tracts of the novel.
It is better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak and leave no doubt.

Offline Dry Brett Kavanaugh

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Re: What are you currently reading?
« Reply #12001 on: July 06, 2022, 04:17:30 AM »
Those who are interested, Haruki Murakami talks about Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut. Please use Google translate.


https://trilltrill.jp/articles/2676392

Offline vandermolen

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Re: What are you currently reading?
« Reply #12002 on: July 06, 2022, 04:24:28 AM »
E. Bronte: Wuthering Heights





The opening section of this novel very well depicts a harsh, brutal, wild and intemperate environment.  And so it is with the introduction of the occupants of Wuthering Heights at the time. This portentous opening sets the tone for the tale that will ultimately be told. This is a re-read after decades and I did not remember the extent of the barbaric brutality that was contained in large tracts of the novel.
Never read it but I love Jane Eyre by her sister.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline coffee

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Re: What are you currently reading?
« Reply #12003 on: July 06, 2022, 06:05:39 AM »
Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Chronicle of a Death Foretold.



A short novel which tells of the slaughter of the central character in plain sight. The murders told everyone they met of their intentions to commit the crime, apparently hoping that someone would stop them. It didn't work. Mesmerizing, in the manner of most books by this author.

My humble opinion is that this book is misunderstood more often than understood. If you enjoy it, it's worth one or two more reads. GGM is a tricky fella. A reader has to watch him closely.

Liberty for the wolf is death for the lamb.

Offline aligreto

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Re: What are you currently reading?
« Reply #12004 on: July 06, 2022, 07:27:05 AM »
Never read it but I love Jane Eyre by her sister.

It is well worth a read, Jeffrey. It is always interesting and engaging but it does not always make for pleasant reading.
It is better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak and leave no doubt.

Offline SonicMan46

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Re: What are you currently reading?
« Reply #12005 on: July 06, 2022, 08:14:57 AM »
Well, I've not posted for over a month, but below are the books on my agenda - done w/ the first one and still reading the others - Dave :)

Code Talker: The First and Only Memoir By One of the Original Navajo Code Talkers of WWII (2011) - see first quote below; Chester Nez, one of the original Navajos who as Marines developed an unbreakable code using their native language.

Vanderbilt: The Rise and Fall of an American Dynasty (2021) by Anderson Cooper & Katherine Howe - Cooper, son of Gloria Vanderbilt and a great etc. grandson of the Commodore writes selectively about the Vanderbilt family - reviews somewhat mixed but I'm enjoying (on the last few chapters) - my interest relates to the famous Biltmore House in Asheville, NC (just a 2 1/2 drive for us and a place we have visited often).

Rebels at Sea: Privateering in the American Revolution (2022) by Eric Jay Dolin - brief synopsis third quote below - over the decades I've read numerous books on American wars, especially the Revolution and the Civil War, but the finding of the American Navy and the Revolutionary War exploits is often not well covered - just starting but excellent so far.

River of the Gods: Genius, Courage, and Betrayal in the Search for the Source of the Nile (2022) by Candice Millard - finding the headwaters of the White Nile - synopsis in the last quote.  About a third into the book - the only hardcover in the bunch, the rest Kindle purchases.  Dave :)

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Code Talker - during World War II, the Japanese had managed to crack every code the United States used. But when the Marines turned to its Navajo recruits to develop and implement a secret military language, they created the only unbroken code in modern warfare—and helped assure victory for the United States over Japan in the South Pacific. (Source)

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Vanderbilt - a dramatic tale expertly told of rapacious ambition, decadent excess, and covert and overt tyranny and trauma. . . . With resplendent detail, the authors capture the gasp-eliciting extravagance of the Vanderbilt Gilded Age mansions. . . . With its intrinsic empathy and in-depth profiles of women, this is a distinctly intimate, insightful, and engrossing chronicle of an archetypal, self-consuming American dynasty. . . . Irresistible. (Source)

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Rebels at Sea - the heroic story of the founding of the U.S. Navy during the Revolution has been told many times, yet largely missing from maritime histories of America’s first war is the ragtag fleet of private vessels that truly revealed the new nation’s character—above all, its ambition and entrepreneurial ethos. (Source)

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Rivers of the Gods - for millennia the location of the Nile River’s headwaters was shrouded in mystery. In the 19th century, there was  a frenzy of interest in ancient Egypt. At the same time, European powers sent off waves of explorations intended to map the unknown corners of the globe – and extend their colonial empires. Richard Burton and John Hanning Speke were sent by the Royal Geographical Society to claim the prize for England. Burton spoke twenty-nine languages, and was a decorated soldier. Speke was a young aristocrat and Army officer determined to make his mark. (Source)

   

Offline Ganondorf

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Re: What are you currently reading?
« Reply #12006 on: July 06, 2022, 08:44:46 AM »
Finished L'assommoir yesterday. What a book! Initially I had problem with how Zola, determined to depict wide ranges of personality within human beings apparently didn't seem to consider women human beings since it appeared she way too often makes his female characters either idealized angels or veritable she-devils. But then I realized I just didn't catch all the subtleties of his writing. For example, Lorilleaux (both wife and husband) seemed to me mere malicious gossips until I read Zola's comment that they represent "les esclaves et les victimes de la petite fabrication en chambre". They are not malicious people who happen to have awful jobs and conditions, relfecting their awful personality but rather they've become awful because of their awful job and conditions, and in this way they seem closer to Gervaise. Baroness Sandorff in L'argent seems like your typical ice queen... but it is mentioned that she actually feels horror and despair at not being able to feel any passion and thus she turns to gambling because it is the only thing left which gives her sense of feeling passion. Unfortunately, this gambling of course damages her further and in this respect she appears to be entrapped and truly a tragic character.