Author Topic: Liszt's Dante Sonata  (Read 7857 times)

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George

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Liszt's Dante Sonata
« on: August 18, 2007, 11:59:13 AM »


Who would you recommend for an intense reading of this work?
« Last Edit: August 18, 2007, 12:04:21 PM by George »

Offline Holden

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Re: Liszt's Dante Sonata
« Reply #1 on: August 18, 2007, 12:49:51 PM »

Who would you recommend for an intense reading of this work?


Cziffra, followed by Hough or Barry Douglas
Cheers

Holden

sidoze

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Re: Liszt's Dante Sonata
« Reply #2 on: August 18, 2007, 12:55:27 PM »
presuming you've heard of him, the obvious choice is Nyiregyhazi. It's like no other performance, naturally.

http://www.fugue.us/Nyiregyhazi_discography-3_E.html

George

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Re: Liszt's Dante Sonata
« Reply #3 on: August 18, 2007, 03:54:40 PM »
Cziffra, followed by Hough or Barry Douglas

I have Hough, Michel Bourdoncle and Jando.

I will revisit the Hough. 

George

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Re: Liszt's Dante Sonata
« Reply #4 on: August 18, 2007, 03:55:05 PM »
presuming you've heard of him, the obvious choice is Nyiregyhazi. It's like no other performance, naturally.

http://www.fugue.us/Nyiregyhazi_discography-3_E.html

I haven't heard of him, thanks for the link.

Offline Dancing Divertimentian

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Re: Liszt's Dante Sonata
« Reply #5 on: August 18, 2007, 04:55:14 PM »
presuming you've heard of him, the obvious choice is Nyiregyhazi. It's like no other performance, naturally.


Thanks for the link, but, well, to my ears Nyiregyhazi sounds as if he could use a caffeine jolt.

Sorely lacking is a sense of mystery, abandon, and excitement. Gotta let 'er rip in Liszt or the music simply sinks.

Listen to Cziffra's 1959 Torino recital performance for requisite muscle and broodiness.



Veit Bach-a baker who found his greatest pleasure in a little cittern which he took with him even into the mill and played while the grinding was going on. In this way he had a chance to have the rhythm drilled into him. And this was the beginning of a musical inclination in his descendants. JS Bach

George

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Re: Liszt's Dante Sonata
« Reply #6 on: August 18, 2007, 04:57:48 PM »
Thanks for the link, but, well, to my ears Nyiregyhazi sounds as if he could use a caffeine jolt.

Nice to "see" you, Don!  :)

I thought similarly about the interpretation until things picked up further on and I was VERY impressed.

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Listen to Cziffra's 1959 Torino recital performance for requisite muscle and broodiness.

Gotta link for that one?

Offline Dancing Divertimentian

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Re: Liszt's Dante Sonata
« Reply #7 on: August 18, 2007, 05:26:44 PM »
Nice to "see" you, Don!  :)

Ditto, George! Good to be back! ;D

Quote
I thought similarly about the interpretation until things picked up further on and I was VERY impressed.

That's awesome! Cziffra starts off strong and never lets up!

Quote
Gotta link for that one?

Spot-checking I found this link which could be the one as it's the same label - Arkadia - as mine. Though mine says nothing about "78's" on the package.

I don't think this one was ever widely available, though. I've had it for years and don't recall ever seeing it anywhere. Long OOP, safe to say.



Veit Bach-a baker who found his greatest pleasure in a little cittern which he took with him even into the mill and played while the grinding was going on. In this way he had a chance to have the rhythm drilled into him. And this was the beginning of a musical inclination in his descendants. JS Bach

sidoze

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Re: Liszt's Dante Sonata
« Reply #8 on: August 19, 2007, 12:03:38 AM »
Thanks for the link, but, well, to my ears Nyiregyhazi sounds as if he could use a caffeine jolt.

Sorely lacking is a sense of mystery, abandon, and excitement. Gotta let 'er rip in Liszt or the music simply sinks.

Listen to Cziffra's 1959 Torino recital performance for requisite muscle and broodiness.





I know what you mean, but Nyiregyhazi never follows tacit rules like this, which is what makes him interesting I think. He was called the reincarnation of Liszt, and is generally acknowledged to have the most massive piano sound caught on record (Youtube has a video which captures it). Of course that doesn't mean the music is going to be great, but it's certainly going to be something unlike anyone elses, as this altered Dante sonata is, I think. Very extreme playing of course, but heavy, dark, thunderous, not flash and lightning. Lacking in mystery isn't something I can agree with at all.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WB8RfLtVgpU

Offline Peregrine

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Re: Liszt's Dante Sonata
« Reply #9 on: August 19, 2007, 12:18:53 AM »
Wow! Thunderous playing indeed! Cheers for that link Tony.

I've had his opera paraphrases disc on VAI for a while, didn't think there was much more out there, now have a disc full of Liszt. Brilliant!

The web-site seemed to be saying there's an M&A CD to come out...?
« Last Edit: August 19, 2007, 02:27:58 AM by Peregrine »
Yes, we have no bananas

sidoze

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Re: Liszt's Dante Sonata
« Reply #10 on: August 19, 2007, 12:46:14 AM »
Yep, theres a 2CD M&A set coming. It contains a life-endingly depressing improvisation on the slow movement of Rachmaninoff's PC 2. Strangely enough it runs along the same lines as Pogorelich's performance of the work (though of course the latter wouldn't say that his is improvised or arranged). Not sure about the release date but it looks fascinating (I've only heard the Liszt legendes and Rach). Track listing is here:

http://www.fugue.us/M%26Atracks.gif

Sorry to take the thread off-topic George. I can never resist with this one-of-a-kind pianist  ::)

George

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Re: Liszt's Dante Sonata
« Reply #11 on: August 19, 2007, 05:22:09 AM »


After comparing the first few minutes in the versions I currently own, Jando clearly has the best performance and sound. If only it was a bit more demented.  >:D

Offline Dancing Divertimentian

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Re: Liszt's Dante Sonata
« Reply #12 on: August 19, 2007, 09:09:00 AM »
I know what you mean, but Nyiregyhazi never follows tacit rules like this, which is what makes him interesting I think. He was called the reincarnation of Liszt, and is generally acknowledged to have the most massive piano sound caught on record (Youtube has a video which captures it). Of course that doesn't mean the music is going to be great, but it's certainly going to be something unlike anyone elses, as this altered Dante sonata is, I think. Very extreme playing of course, but heavy, dark, thunderous, not flash and lightning. Lacking in mystery isn't something I can agree with at all.

Cziffra of course had his share of run-ins with the musical fashion police, i.e. those who called for 'tacit' conformity to the music. So give Cziffra credit for his work as a maverick! ;D

But in Liszt head and heart must literally conjoin or else the music suffers. Cziffra made perfect work of Liszt using this philosophy. All while being his own man.

Can't say as hear the same command in Nyiregyhazi.


Quote
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WB8RfLtVgpU

Well, seems to me a "demon incarnate" could make better work of that transition at @ 1:13.




Veit Bach-a baker who found his greatest pleasure in a little cittern which he took with him even into the mill and played while the grinding was going on. In this way he had a chance to have the rhythm drilled into him. And this was the beginning of a musical inclination in his descendants. JS Bach

Offline Holden

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Re: Liszt's Dante Sonata
« Reply #13 on: August 19, 2007, 11:38:00 AM »
Cziffra of course had his share of run-ins with the musical fashion police, i.e. those who called for 'tacit' conformity to the music. So give Cziffra credit for his work as a maverick! ;D

But in Liszt head and heart must literally conjoin or else the music suffers. Cziffra made perfect work of Liszt using this philosophy. All while being his own man.


Well, seems to me a "demon incarnate" could make better work of that transition at @ 1:13.







I couldn't agree more. I've got his EMI 5 CD set of Liszt and the music that comes from the non bravura works is just spellbinding. The bravura works speak for themselves. Those who pigeonhole Cziffra as the super virtuoso don't realise what they are missing out on. My version of the Dante comes from his 'Introuvables' set
Cheers

Holden

sidoze

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Re: Liszt's Dante Sonata
« Reply #14 on: August 19, 2007, 02:01:52 PM »
Those who pigeonhole Cziffra as the super virtuoso don't realise what they are missing out on.

Do people still do that? It's silly and just plain wrong. There's a video on Youtube of Cziffra playing Chopin's Sonata 2 near the end of his life, after his son committed suicide. It's a spellbinding performance.

George

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Re: Liszt's Dante Sonata
« Reply #15 on: August 19, 2007, 04:28:36 PM »
I couldn't agree more. I've got his EMI 5 CD set of Liszt and the music that comes from the non bravura works is just spellbinding. The bravura works speak for themselves. Those who pigeonhole Cziffra as the super virtuoso don't realise what they are missing out on. My version of the Dante comes from his 'Introuvables' set

Yes, I am going to have to get that one at some point. I am pissed that the Dante was not included in the 5 CD Liszt set, though.

George

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Re: Liszt's Dante Sonata
« Reply #16 on: August 19, 2007, 04:32:59 PM »
A number of folks on rmcr recommended the live Arrau performance, so I am going to get it this week.

Anyone hear the Barenboim? 

Offline val

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Re: Liszt's Dante Sonata
« Reply #17 on: August 20, 2007, 02:56:27 AM »
My choice: Arrau, very large, powerful, Brendel (VOX) more simple but very dramatic, Bolet with a magic sound in a deep meditation avoiding the spectacular effects.

George

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Re: Liszt's Dante Sonata
« Reply #18 on: August 21, 2007, 05:00:47 AM »
My choice: Arrau, very large, powerful, Brendel (VOX) more simple but very dramatic, Bolet with a magic sound in a deep meditation avoiding the spectacular effects.

I got the Live Arrau on Orfeo yesterday and the studio Barenboim.

After one listen, I find the Arrau to have many strengths, but the slowish tempo and the distant miking was a disappointment.

Haven't heard the Barenboim yet.

Offline Peregrine

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Re: Liszt's Dante Sonata
« Reply #19 on: August 21, 2007, 06:30:15 AM »
I picked up Pletnev today
 
:)
« Last Edit: August 21, 2007, 06:46:17 AM by Peregrine »
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