Author Topic: Aleksander Tansman (1897-1986)  (Read 11987 times)

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Offline Maciek

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Re: Aleksander Tansman (1897-1986)
« Reply #40 on: February 19, 2009, 05:10:03 PM »
Well, if you ever change your mind, my offer stands - I'll be glad to help.

Offline Maciek

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Re: Aleksander Tansman (1897-1986)
« Reply #41 on: November 11, 2009, 01:37:07 PM »
Just noticed that Chandos released a disc of Tansman's piano music back in June. Anyone heard it?

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Aleksander Tansman (1897-1986)
« Reply #42 on: October 11, 2011, 04:30:11 PM »
Thought I would resurrect this thread since it's last post was in 09. I listened to Tansman's Symphony No. 4 and have to say that the music did little for me. It was quite well-crafted, but craft alone doesn't make a composition click for me. There has to be much more, much, much more. His debt to Stravinsky is obvious, but, at the same time, Tansman isn't really coming up with anything unique either. He'll throw in a little jazz here or there, but Ravel, Stravinsky, Milhaud, and Gershwin did this much better. As another poster said, I think it was Colin (?), but they said the music was unmemorable and indeed it was. It doesn't have that extra bit of spice Prokofiev or Stravinsky has. Tansman obviously had a great musical ability, he was a virtuoso pianist, but musical ability doesn't always translate to being a great composer. You have to have a wild imagination and I think Tansman's music, or at least from this symphony, seemed to lack much of an original concept and a compositional voice.
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Offline Dundonnell

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Re: Aleksander Tansman (1897-1986)
« Reply #43 on: October 12, 2011, 04:35:23 AM »
Very well put :)

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Aleksander Tansman (1897-1986)
« Reply #44 on: October 12, 2011, 07:46:44 AM »
"Humility is society's greatest misconception."

Scarpia

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Re: Aleksander Tansman (1897-1986)
« Reply #45 on: October 10, 2012, 06:42:08 AM »
I've been exploring the music of Tansman recently, and have been very impressed with his works for clarinet (chamber music and concerti).





More recently I've listened to this disc.



The concertino for piano and orchestra is a wonderful piece, bursting with neoclassical energy, perhaps in the manner of works by Stravinsky for the same combination of instruments.  I was also very impressed with two orchestral pieces which were written in recognition of the deaths of composers Tansman was close to, Milhaud and Stravinsky.  These late pieces are in a freer style than the early works of Tansman, and strike me more as homages to the works of those composers than mourning pieces.  Both are full of arresting sonorities and moods.   This is an example of taking a chance on a disc, and having a pleasant surprise.

Next on the list is probably the string quartets, which I managed to acquire recently but never found time to listen to.
« Last Edit: October 10, 2012, 06:51:24 AM by Scarpia »

snyprrr

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Re: Aleksander Tansman (1897-1986)
« Reply #46 on: October 11, 2012, 08:06:59 PM »
I'd love to know what his Masterpiece is. I was just checking him a few days ago.

Offline The new erato

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Re: Aleksander Tansman (1897-1986)
« Reply #47 on: October 11, 2012, 09:56:49 PM »
Thought I would resurrect this thread since it's last post was in 09. I listened to Tansman's Symphony No. 4 and have to say that the music did little for me. It was quite well-crafted, but craft alone doesn't make a composition click for me. There has to be much more, much, much more. His debt to Stravinsky is obvious, but, at the same time, Tansman isn't really coming up with anything unique either. He'll throw in a little jazz here or there, but Ravel, Stravinsky, Milhaud, and Gershwin did this much better. As another poster said, I think it was Colin (?), but they said the music was unmemorable and indeed it was. It doesn't have that extra bit of spice Prokofiev or Stravinsky has. Tansman obviously had a great musical ability, he was a virtuoso pianist, but musical ability doesn't always translate to being a great composer. You have to have a wild imagination and I think Tansman's music, or at least from this symphony, seemed to lack much of an original concept and a compositional voice.
I have a few Tansman discs, including that symphony disc, and I agree completely. Curiously enough I could have substituted Tcherepnin fils in the above paragraph and it would have covered my opinion on him as well.....

snyprrr

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Re: Aleksander Tansman (1897-1986)
« Reply #48 on: October 16, 2017, 08:06:41 AM »
I could've sworn this Thread was up not too long ago?

Anyway, Tansman has been caught up in my post-Stravinsky trawling, along with LesSix and the rest of the Frenchies. I'm finding Tansman's wind work a little more anonymous than his cohorts...

I have:


Suite for ww trio

'Sorcerer...' ww/pf sextet

Nonet for ww/str


I did try the String Quartets at one point... eh... can anyone point me to the best one? I did NOT care for No.1 'Trypich'(?). One or two other tries with Tansman is about all I'm up for. Apparently, he was good chums with Igor in Hollywood, and his earlier music is much more indicative of his range as he became an acolyte musically after the 40s?

Parsifal

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Re: Aleksander Tansman (1897-1986)
« Reply #49 on: October 16, 2017, 08:15:16 AM »
One or two other tries with Tansman is about all I'm up for.

Did you consider any of the works I mentioned in my post above from 2012? I found a lot to enjoy in those works.

Offline kyjo

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Re: Aleksander Tansman (1897-1986)
« Reply #50 on: October 16, 2017, 08:28:47 AM »
I really like Tansman's 4th and 5th symphonies, which have been recorded by Chandos. They have very inventive orchestration and more depth than I was expecting (based on some reviews that I had read). Anyone who enjoys, say, Roussel, Honegger, or Martinu will enjoy these works (though not to say that Tansman really "sounds like" these composers).
« Last Edit: October 16, 2017, 09:07:01 AM by kyjo »
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Baron Scarpia

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Re: Aleksander Tansman (1897-1986)
« Reply #51 on: December 14, 2017, 10:16:20 AM »
Listened to the 4th and 5th symphonies again. I think Tansman is at his best in the lighthearted parts of these works. The fugato finale of the 4th and the scherzo of the 5th were very engaging. In the slow movements I have the impression of music with a lot of texture but without a strong main idea which is being conveyed. In the same way that people will characterize Medner as "Rachmaninoff without tunes" Tansman gives the impression of neoclassical Stravinsky without tunes. I came across another recording of the 4th (Yinon on Koch) which I may listen to next.

I continue to feel that Tansman's best work is in his chamber music.

Baron Scarpia

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Re: Aleksander Tansman (1897-1986)
« Reply #52 on: December 16, 2017, 01:22:30 AM »
After listening to another performance of the 4th symphony, my impression is completely changed.



This recording by Yinon on the Koch label seems almost like another piece of music. Whereas the Caetani recording of Chandos seemed to have a sonic palette consisting of different shades of grey, Yinon finds bright colour in this music. Particularly remarkable are the outer movements. The first movement slow introduction exhibits rich sonorities and harmonies that I did not appreciate in Olegs recording, and the finale in Yinon's recording just seems infinitely more colourful. Doing a little comparison, I think the issue with Oleg use of tempos that are to fast to let the music breath. Yinon's first movement is about 12 minutes, vs about 9 minutes for Caetani!

« Last Edit: December 16, 2017, 10:19:32 AM by Baron Scarpia »

snyprrr

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Re: Aleksander Tansman (1897-1986)
« Reply #53 on: January 01, 2018, 09:50:51 AM »
Last night was my Tansman catch-up... besides what I already have, these discs seemed to me to hold the most promise. Will go back through Thread later:

NAXOS Clarinet disc(s)

Vol.4 of the Chandos Cycle

CPO with 'Stele' and left-hand PC

snyprrr

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Re: Aleksander Tansman (1897-1986) BASIC TANSMAN THEORY
« Reply #54 on: January 02, 2018, 11:46:03 AM »
So, basically, is this Tansman?"

1) 1920-1940

Developing his own brand of what sounds to me like Martinu+Malipiero

2) The 1940s

Apparently the influence of Stravinsky looms over this NeoClassical phase... all I know is I found these works, including the
Symphonies 5-8, not particularly to my liking

3) Later Music

I really enjoyed the 'Stele' and 'Elegie' from the '70s, he now reminds me of the Polish Colorists, maybe like Baird and Bacewz