The Music Room > The Jazz Lounge

The Ragtime Parlor

<< < (4/5) > >>

torut:
Volume 2-4 of That Devilin' Tune are available for download at Google Play ($9.49 for each volume). Vol. 2 (1927-34) has some rag tunes. There is no liner notes, but I found a book of the same name by Allen Lowe. (Same contents?) Looks interesting.

king ubu:

--- Quote from: torut on September 08, 2018, 04:21:44 PM ---Volume 2-4 of That Devilin' Tune are available for download at Google Play ($9.49 for each volume). Vol. 2 (1927-34) has some rag tunes. There is no liner notes, but I found a book of the same name by Allen Lowe. (Same contents?) Looks interesting.

--- End quote ---
I think the book is the same but don't know for sure ... don't have it as I have the four boxes with booklets  :)

bwv 1080:

--- Quote from: schnittkease on March 26, 2018, 10:33:04 AM ---I know, not jazz per se, but an important predecessor of it. Regarded by some as the first distinctly American form of music.

I've been getting to know ragtime over the past couple months - not just the "Big Three," but some popular songs as well. So far Gussie L. Davis with his tearjerkers haven't disappointed, and a few pre-1922 Irving Berlin hits are pleasant. Not into any particular singer(s) at the moment, just composers and their respective works.

As I'm still learning, I thought it would be a decent idea to set up this thread as a place to discuss ragtime. When I learn of new pieces that I like especially I will post them here.

Oh, and let's try to stay away from "coon songs."

--- End quote ---

The first distinctly American music would be Minstrelsy from the mid-1800s including Stephen Foster

https://www.youtube.com/v/rxW8z56piFk

There is a great discussion of Minstrelsy by Rhiannon Giddens beginning at about 2:00 in the below video

https://www.youtube.com/v/N7SWUCpHme8

king ubu:
You may forget that America had music going on long before pale-faced long-nosed folks with weird beliefs were driven out of yurp and started their slaughtering (there's people arguing that the oldest forms of blues - the ones heard in recordings by Robert Johnson and others - are actually based on traditional chanting rhythms used by natives) - music that has been brought down to us cannot be reconstructed (no matter if HIP or not) I know, but still, I don't like that type of sentences ("the first originary ...") - none us were there (I think  ;) )

schnittkease:

--- Quote from: bwv 1080 on September 10, 2018, 09:30:03 AM ---The first distinctly American music would be Minstrelsy from the mid-1800s including Stephen Foster

--- End quote ---

My statement above is definitely exaggerated. I assume that by "Minstrelsy" you refer to (blackface) minstrel songs, which isn't exactly a new form of music as it is a tradition. There was also some blurring of lines around the turn of the century (i.e. compositions with the principal characteristic of ragtime -- syncopation -- could interchangeably be called minstrel songs because of their use in such shows).

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

[*] Previous page

Go to full version