Thirty three and a third.

Started by Irons, November 22, 2018, 11:40:48 PM

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Pohjolas Daughter

Quote from: Irons on September 23, 2022, 07:09:14 AM
It is the good lady of the house birthday today, PD. So no music, tennis or indeed Swiss chocolate tonight, but maybe a beer or two.
Please wish her a happy birthday from me and "the cat chat group".  ;)

PD

Irons

You must have a very good opinion of yourself to write a symphony - John Ireland.

Wanderer

#1622
Quote from: Wanderer on August 31, 2022, 03:57:34 AM
Out of nowhere, these LP's came recently into my possession the usual unfortunate way (someone - a friend's relative - died). They seem to be in mint condition. Many are Melodiya issues (with Russian-only texts) and apparently they were bought directly from the source, during trips behind the Iron Curtain. Unfortunately, my turntable has been out of commission for years, so it may be some time before any of this gets played.

Rachmaninov: Piano Concerto No. 4 & Prokofiev: Piano Concerto No. 3 (Petrov/Moscow Radio Large[?] Symphony Orchestra/Rozhdestvensky) - Melodiya

*ALL IN RUSSIAN* (State Russian Choir/Sveshnikov) - Melodiya

Bellini: Norma (Callas/Corelli/Ludwig/Zaccaria/de Palma/Vincenzi/Teatro alla Scala/Serafin) - EMI Columbia (a handsome boxset)

Beethoven: Piano Sonatas Opp. 13, 27/2 & 57 (Serebryakov) - Melodiya

Haydn: Symphony No. 104 & Beethoven: Symphony No. 8 (?? Orchestra/Markevitch) - Melodiya

Haydn: Symphonies Nos. 88 & 100 (Hungarian State Orchestra/Adam Fischer) - Hungaroton

Beethoven: Piano Concerto No. 4 (Gilels/Cleveland Symphony Orchestra/Szell) - Melodiya

Dvořák: Violin Concerto & Romance, Op. 11 (Suk/Czech Philharmonic Orchestra/Ančerl) - Supraphon

"The Bells of the Alexander Nevski Memorial Church" and other music for a cappella choir by Hristov, Chesnokov & Bortnyanski ("S. Obretenov" Bulgarian A Cappella Choir et al.) - Balkanton

Beethoven: Violin Concerto (Kogan/USSR Radio Symphony Orchestra/Svetlanov) - Melodiya

An 8-LP collection of Tchaikovsky - another handsome boxset {Piano Concerto No. 1 with Wild/RPO/Fistoulari, Violin Concerto with Perlman/LSO/Wallenstein, Symphony No. 5 with the New Philharmonia Orchestra/Horenstein, Symphony No. 6 with the London Festival Orchestra/Gibson, Suites from The Nutcracker (New Symphony Orchestra of London/Boult), Swan Lake (New Symphony Orchestra of London/Boult) and The Sleeping Beauty (RPO/Gamley), Francesca da Rimini (RPO/Münch) and other paraphernalia (Capriccio Italien, Romeo & Juliet Overture, the ubiquitous 1812 Overture, Marche Slave, Waltz & Polonaise from Eugene Onegin and a few more bits and pieces)}

More from where these came from:

Beethoven: Piano Concerto No. 3 (Gilels/Moscow Radio Symphony Orchestra/Kondrashin) - Melodiya

Tchaikovsky: Piano Concerto No. 1 (Milena Mollova/Symphonic Orchestra of the Committee for Television & Radio/Vassil Stefanov) - Balkanton

Kodály: Psalmus Hungaricus & "The Peacock" - Variations on a Hungarian Folk Song (József Simándy/Budapest Chorus/Children's Chorus of the Hungarian Radio & Television/Hungarian State Orchestra/Antal Doráti) - Hungaroton

Tchaikovsky: Piano Concerto No. 1 (Richter/Wiener Symphoniker/Karajan) - Deutsche Grammophon

Beethoven: Symphony No. 3 (Berliner Philharmoniker/Karajan) - Deutsche Grammophon (11/1965)

Tchaikovsky: Capriccio Italien, Op. 45 - The Voyevoda, Op. 78 - Francesca da Rimini, Op. 32 (Russian State Symphony Orchestra/Konstantin Ivanov) - Melodiya

Mozart: Don Giovanni (Fischer-Dieskau/Kohn/Kreppel/Jurinac/E.Haefliger/Stader/Sardi/Seefried/RSO Berlin/RIAS-Kammerchor/Ferenc Fricsay) - Deutsche Grammophon Privilege (boxset with libretto - 😎)

Tchaikovsky: Swan Lake (Moscow Radio Large Symphony Orchestra/Rozhdestvensky) - Melodiya (boxset)

Sakellaridis: O Vaftistikós (The Godson) (Ο Βαφτιστικός : Γαλανίδης/Καραβουσάνου/Κουλουμπής/Κονταξή/Κολάσης/Ριτσιάρδης) - EMI/His Master's Voice (perhaps the most beloved Greek operetta, I was incidentally watching its film version the other day on TV)

Theodorakis: To Axion Esti (Το Άξιον Εστί : Μπιθικώτσης/Κατράκης/Δημήτριεφ/Μικρή Ορχήστρα Αθηνών/Μικτή Χορωδία Θάλειας Βυζαντίου/Θεοδωράκης) - EMI/His Master's Voice (An iconic work of modern Greek music, setting - parts of - the poem by the same name of Greek Nobel laureate Odysseas Elytis. Theodorakis called it "A People's Oratorio", endeavoring a synthesis of western art and Greek traditional music - his efforts were deemed successful and the formidable verses of Elytis thus clad in music have entered the collective Greek psyche like few works before or since.)

Pohjolas Daughter

Quote from: Wanderer on September 25, 2022, 05:40:31 AM
More from where these came from:

Beethoven: Piano Concerto No. 3 (Gilels/Moscow Radio Symphony Orchestra/Kondrashin) - Melodiya

Tchaikovsky: Piano Concerto No. 1 (Milena Mollova/Symphonic Orchestra of the Committee for Television & Radio/Vassil Stefanov) - Balkanton

Kodály: Psalmus Hungaricus & "The Peacock" - Variations on a Hungarian Folk Song (József Simándy/Budapest Chorus/Children's Chorus of the Hungarian Radio & Television/Hungarian State Orchestra/Antal Doráti) - Hungaroton

Tchaikovsky: Piano Concerto No. 1 (Richter/Wiener Symphoniker/Karajan) - Deutsche Grammophon

Beethoven: Symphony No. 3 (Berliner Philharmoniker/Karajan) - Deutsche Grammophon (11/1965)

Tchaikovsky: Capriccio Italien, Op. 45 - The Voyevoda, Op. 78 - Francesca da Rimini, Op. 32 (Russian State Symphony Orchestra/Konstantin Ivanov) - Melodiya

Mozart: Don Giovanni (Fischer-Dieskau/Kohn/Kreppel/Jurinac/E.Haefliger/Stader/Sardi/Seefried/RSO Berlin/RIAS-Kammerchor/Ferenc Fricsay) - Deutsche Grammophon Privilege (boxset with libretto - 😎)

Tchaikovsky: Swan Lake (Moscow Radio Large Symphony Orchestra/Rozhdestvensky) - Melodiya (boxset)

Sakellaridis: O Vaftistikós (The Godson) (Ο Βαφτιστικός : Γαλανίδης/Καραβουσάνου/Κουλουμπής/Κονταξή/Κολάσης/Ριτσιάρδης) - EMI/His Master's Voice (perhaps the most beloved Greek operetta, I was incidentally watching its film version the other day on TV)

Theodorakis: To Axion Esti (Το Άξιον Εστί : Μπιθικώτσης/Κατράκης/Δημήτριεφ/Μικρή Ορχήστρα Αθηνών/Μικτή Χορωδία Θάλειας Βυζαντίου/Θεοδωράκης) - EMI/His Master's Voice (An iconic work of modern Greek music, setting - parts of - the poem by the same name of Greek Nobel laureate Odysseas Elytis. Theodorakis called it "A People's Oratorio", endeavoring a synthesis of western art and Greek traditional music - his efforts were deemed successful and the formidable verses of Elytis thus clad in music have entered the collective Greek psyche like few works before or since.)
Cool beans!  8)

So, now have you found a repair shop for your turntable?  ;)

PD

aligreto

Quote from: Wanderer on September 25, 2022, 05:40:31 AM
More from where these came from:

Beethoven: Piano Concerto No. 3 (Gilels/Moscow Radio Symphony Orchestra/Kondrashin) - Melodiya

Tchaikovsky: Piano Concerto No. 1 (Milena Mollova/Symphonic Orchestra of the Committee for Television & Radio/Vassil Stefanov) - Balkanton

Kodály: Psalmus Hungaricus & "The Peacock" - Variations on a Hungarian Folk Song (József Simándy/Budapest Chorus/Children's Chorus of the Hungarian Radio & Television/Hungarian State Orchestra/Antal Doráti) - Hungaroton

Tchaikovsky: Piano Concerto No. 1 (Richter/Wiener Symphoniker/Karajan) - Deutsche Grammophon

Beethoven: Symphony No. 3 (Berliner Philharmoniker/Karajan) - Deutsche Grammophon (11/1965)

Tchaikovsky: Capriccio Italien, Op. 45 - The Voyevoda, Op. 78 - Francesca da Rimini, Op. 32 (Russian State Symphony Orchestra/Konstantin Ivanov) - Melodiya

Mozart: Don Giovanni (Fischer-Dieskau/Kohn/Kreppel/Jurinac/E.Haefliger/Stader/Sardi/Seefried/RSO Berlin/RIAS-Kammerchor/Ferenc Fricsay) - Deutsche Grammophon Privilege (boxset with libretto - 😎)

Tchaikovsky: Swan Lake (Moscow Radio Large Symphony Orchestra/Rozhdestvensky) - Melodiya (boxset)

Sakellaridis: O Vaftistikós (The Godson) (Ο Βαφτιστικός : Γαλανίδης/Καραβουσάνου/Κουλουμπής/Κονταξή/Κολάσης/Ριτσιάρδης) - EMI/His Master's Voice (perhaps the most beloved Greek operetta, I was incidentally watching its film version the other day on TV)

Theodorakis: To Axion Esti (Το Άξιον Εστί : Μπιθικώτσης/Κατράκης/Δημήτριεφ/Μικρή Ορχήστρα Αθηνών/Μικτή Χορωδία Θάλειας Βυζαντίου/Θεοδωράκης) - EMI/His Master's Voice (An iconic work of modern Greek music, setting - parts of - the poem by the same name of Greek Nobel laureate Odysseas Elytis. Theodorakis called it "A People's Oratorio", endeavoring a synthesis of western art and Greek traditional music - his efforts were deemed successful and the formidable verses of Elytis thus clad in music have entered the collective Greek psyche like few works before or since.)

A good variety of music there to be enjoyed.
I am sure that you will cherish them as much as their previous owner did.
It is better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak and leave no doubt.

Irons

Quote from: Pohjolas Daughter on September 25, 2022, 05:45:24 AM
Cool beans!  8)

So, now have you found a repair shop for your turntable?  ;)

PD

Yes indeed. Get TT fixed. ;)
You must have a very good opinion of yourself to write a symphony - John Ireland.

Irons

Record haul from LA. Not me, sadly.

Stunning film extract of Horowitz playing Scarlatti in Russia.

https://youtu.be/k9CHq8YbHW0
You must have a very good opinion of yourself to write a symphony - John Ireland.

Pohjolas Daughter

Quote from: Irons on September 26, 2022, 06:17:30 AM
Record haul from LA. Not me, sadly.

Stunning film extract of Horowitz playing Scarlatti in Russia.

https://youtu.be/k9CHq8YbHW0
Neat!  Thanks for sharing that.

I want to visit that record shop in LA!!!

PD

Pohjolas Daughter

Irons,

That same store in Los Angeles has some albums listed on eBay.  I'd love a copy of this record, but not at the price that they are offering it for!

https://www.ebay.com/itm/195027614106?hash=item2d688d399a:g:VucAAOSwhUNictlf

Fly away little Eagles....  :(

PD

Irons

Quote from: Pohjolas Daughter on September 26, 2022, 09:07:11 AM
Irons,

That same store in Los Angeles has some albums listed on eBay.  I'd love a copy of this record, but not at the price that they are offering it for!

https://www.ebay.com/itm/195027614106?hash=item2d688d399a:g:VucAAOSwhUNictlf

Fly away little Eagles....  :(

PD

A lot of money PD but in many respects worth it. A sealed copy on Mobile Fidelity, to quote our Karl "nice".

That store in LA looks nice too. In Part.1 of above video Mark includes a picture of it. Since the demise of Classical Exchange due to flooding next to nothing left in London for classical vinyl. I miss my visits to Notting Hill.
You must have a very good opinion of yourself to write a symphony - John Ireland.

Irons

#1630
Spinning.



Not got to listen to PC yet as very taken with Rubbra's Violin Concerto.



Spirited account of Elgar's String Quartet. I have a problem with the lovely Delius SQ. The Fidelio Quartet play the piece beautifully on an old Pye Golden Guinea LP. Every recording that I have heard since, including Brodsky's, sound too driven and rushed.
You must have a very good opinion of yourself to write a symphony - John Ireland.

Pohjolas Daughter

I'll have to revisit Elgar's quartet & piano quintet soon as it's been a while.

Yesterday I ran across this treat:



Bach's Christmas Oratorio with some of my faves like Wunderlich, Janowitz and Ludwig.  Conducted by the one and only Karl Richter.  It included the big libretto booklet and the original filing card too.  :)

PD

vandermolen

Quote from: Irons on September 28, 2022, 03:33:33 AM
Spinning.



Not got to listen to PC yet as very taken with Rubbra's Violin Concerto.



Spirited account of Elgar's String Quartet. I have a problem with the lovely Delius SQ. The Fidelio Quartet play the piece beautifully on an old Pye Golden Guinea LP. Every recording that I have heard since, including Brodsky's, sound too driven and rushed.
The Rubbra Ireland disc looks great Lol. I love the dreamy and reflective Rubbra work.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

ritter

Quote from: Pohjolas Daughter on September 30, 2022, 04:41:20 AM
....

Yesterday I ran across this treat:



Bach's Christmas Oratorio with some of my faves like Wunderlich, Janowitz and Ludwig.  Conducted by the one and only Karl Richter.  It included the big libretto booklet and the original filing card too.  :)

PD
Nice! We had that set in my parents'  house when I was young. It was my introduction to Bach. Fond memories.... :)
ritter
-------------------------------------------------------------
« ...tout cela qui prend forme et solidité, est sorti, ville et jardins, de ma tasse de thé. »

Irons

Quote from: vandermolen on September 30, 2022, 11:46:05 AM
The Rubbra Ireland disc looks great Lol. I love the dreamy and reflective Rubbra work.

I love the Rubbra concerto, Jeffrey. Usually, I will have a stab at describing why I like a piece but for Rubbra I just do and don't know why. I think you have hit nail squarely on head with "reflective".
You must have a very good opinion of yourself to write a symphony - John Ireland.

Pohjolas Daughter

Quote from: ritter on September 30, 2022, 11:54:30 AM
Nice! We had that set in my parents'  house when I was young. It was my introduction to Bach. Fond memories.... :)
Hi Ritter!

Cool!  8)

PD

vandermolen

Quote from: Irons on October 01, 2022, 02:54:46 AM
I love the Rubbra concerto, Jeffrey. Usually, I will have a stab at describing why I like a piece but for Rubbra I just do and don't know why. I think you have hit nail squarely on head with "reflective".
Thanks, Lol. I think that Rubbra's Piano Concerto has a similar quality.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

aligreto

Here is a short article from Discogs which I came across recently featuring the stylus which I thought might be of interest to new entrants into the vinyl world. I put it here for reference.


The Different Types of Record Player Needles

August 21, 2018

If you thought a stylus was a stylus was a stylus, think again. There are several different types of record player needles.

There are four main stylus shapes, excluding a stylus for 78 RPM records. As the grooves of 78s are about 3-4 times wider than a typical 33 1/3 record and require a stylus designed specifically for these grooves. A standard microgroove spherical stylus will ride very low in the groove, producing a noisy signal and greatly accelerating wear on your stylus.

Why does stylus shape matter?

If you're a casual vinyl record enthusiast, the truth is, you probably don't need to lose that much sleep over it. That said, the shape (and construction) of the stylus, contributes to how well it replicates sound from your record, due to the access it has to the surface area of the grooves. It can also contribute to the wear and tear of your vinyl records over time. And of course, both of these things will affect the price of the stylus. So if you value high-end audio and have a bit of extra cash to put into your turntable setup, it's worth knowing about the different types of styli and the benefits of each type. You may also want to be more selective about your stylus depending on whether you're using it for DJing or playing records at home.

Stylus Construction

Before we get into the differences of turntable styli, let's take a step back to the shank construction. The stylus sits at the end of the cantilever within the turntable's cartridge, which is connected to the tonearm. The stylus attached to the cantilever will be a nude diamond or a tipped diamond. With a tipped diamond, it's just that – the very tip of the stylus is diamond while the rest is metal – as opposed to nude diamond where the stylus is a whole diamond that's glued to the cantilever. Unsurprisingly, the latter is the premium option as it has a lower mass and tracks more accurately.

Stylus Types

Spherical

Spherical, or conical, is the most common stylus type and are the least expensive. It looks a bit like the tip of a ballpoint pen up close. Because of their relatively large radius, spherical styli trace less of the smaller groove modulations that represent higher frequencies. Some claim spherical styli produce the most wear on records because the contact area of the diamond is restricted to two specific points, while contenders claim that this actually produces less wear.

Elliptical

The next most common stylus type is elliptical, or bi-radial. Elliptical makes contact across a larger area of the groove wall due to its dual radii. This allows for more precise tracking, improved frequency response (especially highs), improved phase response, and lower distortion, particularly in hard-to-track inner grooves. These types of styli usually wear a bit faster, and you'll need to pay attention to the cartridge and tonearm alignment for best results.

Hyperelliptical

Hyperelliptical, also known as shibata, fine line, or stereohedron. As the name suggests, this type is the next stage of evolution of the elliptical stylus, sharpening the design to make greater contact with the record grooves. When properly aligned, this stylus offers excellent high-frequency performance, longer tip life, improved tracking, and lower record wear. Due to their advanced design and difficulty to manufacture, they're more expensive than the elliptical stylus.

Micro-ridge

The micro-ridge, or microline stylus is the most advanced of the four styli types. The computer designed tip comes close to the shape of a cutting stylus used to produce master discs. Their multilevel "ridge" shape allows this stylus to give the best high-frequency performance with extended record and stylus life (when aligned correctly). They're very difficult to manufacture and very expensive.


It is better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak and leave no doubt.

Valentino

#1638
I've got two cartridges these days.
One is a very old Audio-Technica AT-OC10, which 'm keeping for reference as my current tonearm cannot handle it properly. It's a low output moving coil with a MicroLine (TM) also known as microridge or SAS stylus on a Boron cantilever.
The other one is a Denon DL-301II  low output moving coil with a "special elliptical" stylus on a tapered aluminium cantilever. I guess it's actually a Shibata due to the very extended frequency response that no elliptical stylus can.

...

I promised listening impressions on the "new" RVW double album.



The symphony got me afraid, and the last movement desolate.
It's all very good, but since I don't know my RVW it's wetted my appetite for more. That's something, isn't it?
Not the most quiet pressing, I'm afraid.
We audiophiles don't really like music, but we sure love the sound it makes

vandermolen

#1639
Quote from: Valentino on October 05, 2022, 08:45:10 AM
I've got two cartridges these days.
One is a very old Audio-Technica AT-OC10, which 'm keeping for reference as my current tonearm cannot handle it properly. It's a low output moving coil with a MicroLine (TM) also known as microridge or SAS stylus on a Boron cantilever.
The other one is a Denon DL-301II  low output moving coil with a "special elliptical" stylus on a tapered aluminium cantilever. I guess it's actually a Shibata due to the very extended frequency response that no elliptical stylus can.

...

I promised listening impressions on the "new" RVW double album.



The symphony got me afraid, and the last movement desolate.
It's all very good, but since I don't know my RVW it's wetted my appetite for more. That's something, isn't it?
Not the most quiet pressing, I'm afraid.
Thanks v much for the VW feedback. There are two recent VW LPs that I'd like if I ever get a decent turntable (Hichox's recording of the 1913 version of A London Symphony and the one that you are reporting back on). If you want to explore more VW I'd recommend the Hickox recording:
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).