Author Topic: Thirty three and a third.  (Read 66169 times)

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Offline aligreto

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Re: Thirty three and a third.
« Reply #620 on: October 04, 2020, 01:11:21 PM »
Hi Fergus, it has been busy lately, and I have not had a chance to take the Oracle back to Delphi. However, I plan to do so in the next month or so, when things will quiet down significantly for me. Then, six weeks off for winter break. Late Jan gets busy again with teaching Medical Parasitology for the first time---lots of work! So, I plan to get busy digitizing in Nov, Dec.

How are you doing??

All good here, my friend, thankfully.

Let us know when you eventually bring the TT to be looked at.
It is better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak and leave no doubt.

Offline André Le Nôtre

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Re: Thirty three and a third.
« Reply #621 on: October 04, 2020, 01:25:21 PM »
Thanks, yes I will! Glad you are doing well. (I have been very slow with email lately. sorry.)

Here is the specimen in question--attached photos (image quality is much better after clicking on the image!). On the morning of 7 April 2007, I did not set out to find an orange vinyl LP of Johnny Mathis (from Taiwan, no less), but it just worked out that way! The fun of rummaging around in bins of used LPs!
« Last Edit: October 04, 2020, 01:34:27 PM by André Le Nôtre »

Offline aligreto

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Re: Thirty three and a third.
« Reply #622 on: October 04, 2020, 02:25:23 PM »
I have been very slow with email lately. sorry.



In your own time.



Quote
Here is the specimen in question--attached photos (image quality is much better after clicking on the image!). On the morning of 7 April 2007, I did not set out to find an orange vinyl LP of Johnny Mathis (from Taiwan, no less), but it just worked out that way! The fun of rummaging around in bins of used LPs!





Nice!
It is better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak and leave no doubt.

Offline Pohjolas Daughter

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Re: Thirty three and a third.
« Reply #623 on: October 05, 2020, 05:32:26 AM »
Thanks, yes I will! Glad you are doing well. (I have been very slow with email lately. sorry.)

Here is the specimen in question--attached photos (image quality is much better after clicking on the image!). On the morning of 7 April 2007, I did not set out to find an orange vinyl LP of Johnny Mathis (from Taiwan, no less), but it just worked out that way! The fun of rummaging around in bins of used LPs!
Thanks for the photos.  Pretty orange and blue!  :)  Wonderful singer Johnny Mathis.  Glad that it worked out well for you.

Yes, it is fun to dig through bins.  My one gripe here:  often the classical record bins are on the floor (or just slightly off of the ground).  Makes for awkward (and increasingly painful) digging through them!  Bad light too.  Is this often the case outside of the US?

PD


Offline vandermolen

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Re: Thirty three and a third.
« Reply #624 on: October 05, 2020, 10:15:05 AM »
I very rarely buy LPs but have recently acquired these two Miaskovsky discs. Gauk's recording of Symphony 27 is the most moving of all. I'm sorry that it wasn't released on CD in the Brilliant Gauk boxed set. I have never owned a recording of the 7th Symphony or 'Links' on LP:
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Irons

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Re: Thirty three and a third.
« Reply #625 on: October 06, 2020, 07:06:54 AM »
I very rarely buy LPs but have recently acquired these two Miaskovsky discs. Gauk's recording of Symphony 27 is the most moving of all. I'm sorry that it wasn't released on CD in the Brilliant Gauk boxed set. I have never owned a recording of the 7th Symphony or 'Links' on LP:


Congratulations, Jeffrey. I always look in my usual haunts but never find Miaskovsky other then Melodiya/EMI symphonies and quartets.
You must have a very good opinion of yourself to write a symphony - John Ireland.

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Thirty three and a third.
« Reply #626 on: October 06, 2020, 09:07:47 AM »
Congratulations, Jeffrey. I always look in my usual haunts but never find Miaskovsky other then Melodiya/EMI symphonies and quartets.

Thanks Lol. I got a good deal for buying two LPs. He also had an LP with Symphony 17 (Gauk I think) if you are interested. 17 is one of the very best.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Irons

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Re: Thirty three and a third.
« Reply #627 on: October 08, 2020, 01:08:23 PM »


Recorded in the Kingsway Hall 17-19th February 1958 with an initial release on full price Decca (wide band). Reissued in 1968 on Decca Ace of Diamonds and also issued on the Decca "World of Classics" series.

I own a copy of Ace of Diamonds SDD 188 which sounds very fine with a cracking performance from Peter Katin and Sir Adrian.
You must have a very good opinion of yourself to write a symphony - John Ireland.

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Thirty three and a third.
« Reply #628 on: October 17, 2020, 01:50:41 AM »
Currently listening to Miaskovsky Symphony No. 27 Moscow Radio SO cond. Alexander Gauk.
This is by far the most moving performance I have heard of this great work - it has a depth of feeling which goes beyond the more recent performances by Svetlanov and Polyansky, good as they are. The sound quality is much better than I anticipated:
« Last Edit: October 17, 2020, 09:48:17 AM by vandermolen »
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Pohjolas Daughter

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Re: Thirty three and a third.
« Reply #629 on: October 17, 2020, 08:04:48 AM »


Recorded in the Kingsway Hall 17-19th February 1958 with an initial release on full price Decca (wide band). Reissued in 1968 on Decca Ace of Diamonds and also issued on the Decca "World of Classics" series.

I own a copy of Ace of Diamonds SDD 188 which sounds very fine with a cracking performance from Peter Katin and Sir Adrian.
The Ace of Diamonds cover is quite nice.  The Decca one seems a bit strange to me; any idea where the photo was taken?

PD

Offline Pohjolas Daughter

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Re: Thirty three and a third.
« Reply #630 on: October 17, 2020, 08:06:18 AM »
Currently listening to Miaskovsky Symphony No. 27 Moscow Radio SO cond. Alexander Gauk.
This is by far the most moving performance I have heard of this great work - it has a depth of feeling which goes beyond the more recent performances by Svetlanov and Polyansky, good as they are. The sound quality I'd much better than I anticipated:

I really need to check out Miaskovsky.  I remember hearing about him a number of years ago.  If I'm remembering correctly, he wrote a heck of a lot of symphonies??

PD

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Thirty three and a third.
« Reply #631 on: October 17, 2020, 09:50:50 AM »
I really need to check out Miaskovsky.  I remember hearing about him a number of years ago.  If I'm remembering correctly, he wrote a heck of a lot of symphonies??

PD

Twenty seven in total PD

My recommendations are 3,6,17,21,25 and 27.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Irons

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Re: Thirty three and a third.
« Reply #632 on: October 17, 2020, 11:55:33 PM »
The Ace of Diamonds cover is quite nice.  The Decca one seems a bit strange to me; any idea where the photo was taken?

PD

Not a clue, P. After amazingly coming up with the correct location recently of a stream by a forum member it would not surprise me if someone knows.
You must have a very good opinion of yourself to write a symphony - John Ireland.

Offline Pohjolas Daughter

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Re: Thirty three and a third.
« Reply #633 on: October 18, 2020, 03:54:51 AM »
Twenty seven in total PD

My recommendations are 3,6,17,21,25 and 27.
Thanks Jeffrey.  I've duly noted them and will have them with me when I visit record stores--so long as I remember to take my phone with me!  ::)

PD

Offline Pohjolas Daughter

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Re: Thirty three and a third.
« Reply #634 on: October 18, 2020, 03:56:06 AM »
Not a clue, P. After amazingly coming up with the correct location recently of a stream by a forum member it would not surprise me if someone knows.
I can tell you that the photographer was Hans Wild in any event.  :) From Discogs.

PD

Offline Irons

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Re: Thirty three and a third.
« Reply #635 on: October 18, 2020, 05:10:59 AM »
Currently listening to Miaskovsky Symphony No. 27 Moscow Radio SO cond. Alexander Gauk.
This is by far the most moving performance I have heard of this great work - it has a depth of feeling which goes beyond the more recent performances by Svetlanov and Polyansky, good as they are. The sound quality is much better than I anticipated:


You may or may not be interested Jeffrey but I find this a handy tool for dating Melodiya LPs.

http://www.pnprecords.spb.ru/vynil-labels/index.phtml
You must have a very good opinion of yourself to write a symphony - John Ireland.

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Thirty three and a third.
« Reply #636 on: October 20, 2020, 02:31:18 AM »
You may or may not be interested Jeffrey but I find this a handy tool for dating Melodiya LPs.

http://www.pnprecords.spb.ru/vynil-labels/index.phtml

Very interesting and helpful Lol. Thank you.
I remember that some of my earliest Melodiya LPs featured heavy vinyl and the blue label. These included Kondrashin's LP set of Miaskovsky's 6th Symphony - recently reissued on an Alto CD ( ;D) and Kabalevsky's 4th Symphony conducted by Kabalevsky. As far as I recall these came in plain white cardboard sleeves with no notes at all, either in Russian or English. These would have both been borrowed from the record library in London. Later ones, like Miaskovsky's 27th Symphony (Svetlanov) I acquired myself and featured the red label. It's interesting to have the historical context of those releases explained.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Irons

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Re: Thirty three and a third.
« Reply #637 on: October 20, 2020, 08:28:07 AM »
Very interesting and helpful Lol. Thank you.
I remember that some of my earliest Melodiya LPs featured heavy vinyl and the blue label. These included Kondrashin's LP set of Miaskovsky's 6th Symphony - recently reissued on an Alto CD ( ;D) and Kabalevsky's 4th Symphony conducted by Kabalevsky. As far as I recall these came in plain white cardboard sleeves with no notes at all, either in Russian or English. These would have both been borrowed from the record library in London. Later ones, like Miaskovsky's 27th Symphony (Svetlanov) I acquired myself and featured the red label. It's interesting to have the historical context of those releases explained.

Any LP is an artefact and some have historical importance. I am particularly interested Jeffrey in music for the home market manufactured on LP behind the old "Iron Curtain". Russia, GDR, Bulgaria, Poland and many more are a treasure trove of rare and interesting music. I have been searching for a particular string quartet for years without success only to discover over the weekend it is available on CD! ::) Lesson learned - don't discount other music carriers. I will post my thoughts on this work in the very near future. Many others due to the passage of time the master tapes will be either lost or unusable. A LP copy may be all that has survived and if in good condition, historically significant.

Quite possibly available in digital form, but even so I prize a first pressing of Rostropvich with the Taneyev Quartet performing the Schubert String Quintet. Tully Potter describes this as the greatest recording of the Quintet and I for one have no argument with that.



 
   
« Last Edit: October 20, 2020, 08:34:38 AM by Irons »
You must have a very good opinion of yourself to write a symphony - John Ireland.

Offline Pohjolas Daughter

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Re: Thirty three and a third.
« Reply #638 on: October 20, 2020, 08:48:31 AM »
Any LP is an artefact and some have historical importance. I am particularly interested Jeffrey in music for the home market manufactured on LP behind the old "Iron Curtain". Russia, GDR, Bulgaria, Poland and many more are a treasure trove of rare and interesting music. I have been searching for a particular string quartet for years without success only to discover over the weekend it is available on CD! ::) Lesson learned - don't discount other music carriers. I will post my thoughts on this work in the very near future. Many others due to the passage of time the master tapes will be either lost or unusable. A LP copy may be all that has survived and if in good condition, historically significant.

Quite possibly available in digital form, but even so I prize a first pressing of Rostropvich with the Taneyev Quartet performing the Schubert String Quintet. Tully Potter describes this as the greatest recording of the Quintet and I for one have no argument with that.



 
   
Cool!  8)  You might find the reviews here to be of interest Irons.  https://www.amazon.com/Schubert-Quintet-Taneyev-Mistislav-Rostropovich/dp/B007S9IWYW#customerReviews

Now you have me intrigued as to what other recording you've been searching for!

PD

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Thirty three and a third.
« Reply #639 on: October 20, 2020, 09:04:37 AM »
Any LP is an artefact and some have historical importance. I am particularly interested Jeffrey in music for the home market manufactured on LP behind the old "Iron Curtain". Russia, GDR, Bulgaria, Poland and many more are a treasure trove of rare and interesting music. I have been searching for a particular string quartet for years without success only to discover over the weekend it is available on CD! ::) Lesson learned - don't discount other music carriers. I will post my thoughts on this work in the very near future. Many others due to the passage of time the master tapes will be either lost or unusable. A LP copy may be all that has survived and if in good condition, historically significant.

Quite possibly available in digital form, but even so I prize a first pressing of Rostropvich with the Taneyev Quartet performing the Schubert String Quintet. Tully Potter describes this as the greatest recording of the Quintet and I for one have no argument with that.



 
   
Interesting indeed Lol. Works like Balanchivadze's excellent First Symphony, which a kind person copied for me years ago, may only be available on LP for all I know.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).