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Introducing New Listeners to Classical Music

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Daverz:

--- Quote from: Szykneij on December 12, 2021, 06:05:10 AM ---Last night I had the pleasure of hearing Andrea Bocelli in concert at Boston Garden. It was clearly a sold-out crowd in a venue with a capacity of 20,000. I'm sure the vast majority of attendees were not serious classical music listeners, but the ovations for the genuine classical works were just as loud as those for the more mainstream pieces. Classical "crossover" artists are often criticized for not sticking to the "authentic" repertoire, but their value in introducing new listeners to classical music is immeasurable.

--- End quote ---

I think a good way to transition someone from that sort of crossover is Canteloube's songs, particularly the Davrath recordings.  I can't imagine anyone not being enchanted by, for example, Bailero.

https://www.youtube.com/v/-iI8tMHrD_c

SimonNZ:

--- Quote from: Szykneij on December 12, 2021, 06:05:10 AM ---Last night I had the pleasure of hearing Andrea Bocelli in concert at Boston Garden. It was clearly a sold-out crowd in a venue with a capacity of 20,000. I'm sure the vast majority of attendees were not serious classical music listeners, but the ovations for the genuine classical works were just as loud as those for the more mainstream pieces. Classical "crossover" artists are often criticized for not sticking to the "authentic" repertoire, but their value in introducing new listeners to classical music is immeasurable.

--- End quote ---

I don't share your faith in that. Pretty much nobody I talk to online or irl who loves classical says they got in via crossover stuff. And all the people I know who like crossover seem happy to have found their level.they

SimonNZ:

--- Quote from: Daverz on December 12, 2021, 08:01:35 AM ---I think a good way to transition someone from that sort of crossover is Canteloube's songs, particularly the Davrath recordings.  I can't imagine anyone not being enchanted by, for example, Bailero.

https://www.youtube.com/v/-iI8tMHrD_c

--- End quote ---

Ironically it was the Devrath recording of that work I played to a friend of mine who likes pop-opera crossover.

He didn't get it. I mean not at all. He's welcome to like what he likes of course, but I felt a little saddened by that.

Daverz:

--- Quote from: SimonNZ on December 12, 2021, 09:06:11 AM ---Ironically it was the Devrath recording of that work I played to a friend of mine who likes pop-opera crossover.

He didn't get it. I mean not at all. He's welcome to like what he likes of course, but I felt a little saddened by that.

--- End quote ---

 :'( :'( :'(

It's also been sung by some pop singers, and there have been many more operatic treatments (e.g. von Stade, Moffo, etc).

SimonNZ:
I don't think that's the problem. I think it's more that these oversweetened chocolate box collections misrepresent the wider repertoire, and trying to hear some greatest hit in its context and in its unsweetened form is like then being told to eat your greens.

He also had a duet from Monteverdi' Poppea on something which he particularly liked and I tried to gently build on that with a collection of Monteverdi duets with Kirkby and Tubbs, but that too was a nonstarter.

He lost interest after that and I knew better than to keep trying, even gently.



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