The Music Room > Classical Music for Beginners

Introducing New Listeners to Classical Music

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steve ridgway:
It wouldn’t hurt to give kids a little sample of many different types of classical music, or even other types of music featuring classical instruments. Something might spark their enthusiasm and encourage them to take up an instrument. It’s taken me about 40 years to start looking beyond the popular and realise there’s some classical music I actually like.

Marc:
Would this good ole series still have effect?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Young_People%27s_Concerts

accmacmus:

--- Quote from: steve ridgway on November 13, 2019, 09:42:18 PM ---It wouldn’t hurt to give kids a little sample of many different types of classical music, or even other types of music featuring classical instruments. Something might spark their enthusiasm and encourage them to take up an instrument. It’s taken me about 40 years to start looking beyond the popular and realise there’s some classical music I actually like.

--- End quote ---

Can't but quote this, «classical» is such a big turf and many people over the years develop an affinity for a particular period or instrument. So the more (and the more varied), the merrier!

edit: ouch, sorry for necroposting

Holden:
This prompted me to go to my recording of 'Au Fond Du Temple Saint' from the Pearl Fishers which is surely the piece MC Urkneal was referring to. Jussi Bjorling and Robert Merrill - spine tingling music.

SimonNZ:
A young collegue at my work heard me playing the classical radio station a few weeks back and next time we had to work together asked that it be left playing for the whole of our ten hour shift so he could get a sense of it.

Luckily for him the station changed some years back to playing only individual movements rather than whole works, so its more useful as a sampler and if there is something he might actively dislike it will be replaced in short order.

He had questions for me all through the night and it was unexpected just how little context he had fot the most basic assumptions about classical music performance I would previously thought were acquired through osmosis or films and tv even if you've never heard a whole symphony.

At one point he recognized a tune from an advertisement, I said it was Vivaldi, and much of our conversation was centered on Vivaldi. He was surprised to learn he died going on three hundred years ago and people were writing music back then. He said "So you haven't been to a Vivaldi concert, then". I said I'd been to many, and he honestly didn't understand how that was possible and I had to explain publishing and that most concerts are without the composer and using only the sheet music as their guide. At another point he looked up Vivaldi on Spotify and asked if these were Vivaldi's own recordings, and I had to explain that he died before recorded sound and how and when that technology happened. I showed him a portrait and again he was genuinely baffled that someone should look and dress so strangely.

I don't offer these anecdotes here to mock him, but to express my own surprise that its now possible to reach the age of twenty five with absolute zero context. I was given at least a sketchy outline at school. He tells me it was never mentioned.

My main advice was to treat it like getting into any other genre of music: don't treat it like homework - if you find something you like play more of that.

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