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60 years of Kind of Blue

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Mirror Image:
There’s no question it’s a great album, but it’s personally not a favorite of mine. If I had to pick one Miles album that I consider ‘one for the desert island' it would be Seven Steps to Heaven.

San Antone:

--- Quote from: Mirror Image on March 12, 2019, 07:59:48 PM ---There’s no question it’s a great album, but it’s personally not a favorite of mine. If I had to pick one Miles album that I consider ‘one for the desert island' it would be Seven Steps to Heaven.

--- End quote ---

Seven Steps is a good record.  But Kind of Blue is in another league altogether. 

king ubu:

--- Quote from: San Antone on March 12, 2019, 08:09:59 PM ---Seven Steps is a good record.  But Kind of Blue is in another league altogether.

--- End quote ---

Totally, yeah! It's one of the most amazing jazz records ever made!

Ashley Kahn's book on the album is very much worth reading - no big news or findings in there, but it's a well-done compilation of what is known about the origin of the music, and a good read, too:

San Antone:

--- Quote from: king ubu on March 12, 2019, 11:48:56 PM ---Totally, yeah! It's one of the most amazing jazz records ever made!

Ashley Kahn's book on the album is very much worth reading - no big news or findings in there, but it's a well-done compilation of what is known about the origin of the music, and a good read, too:



--- End quote ---

Yeah, I have that book.  Probably time to look through it again.

aukhawk:

--- Quote from: Mirror Image on March 12, 2019, 07:59:48 PM ---There’s no question it’s a great album, but it’s personally not a favorite of mine. If I had to pick one Miles album that I consider ‘one for the desert island' it would be Seven Steps to Heaven.

--- End quote ---

For me it would be Miles Smiles, from 1966.  The mid-sixties quintet in peak form, untypically up-beat, and just before the music became over-influenced by Wayne Shorter's trance-like compositions.  Tony Williams' best album by far (he would have been about 20 at the time!)



Seven Steps to Heaven was a transitional album, featuring two different quintet lineups, one recording in Hollywood in April '63, the other in New York in May.  The title track came from the May session and is the earliest recording of Herbie Hancock and Tony Williams playing with Miles.  Ironically Victor Feldman is credited as co-composer - he is the pianist Hancock replaced (he didn't want to leave Hollywood) and doesn't play on this track.  Williams is 17 years old here, Hancock 23.



Returning to Kind of Blue, one thing that always strikes me is the outstanding playing of Cannonball Adderley.  He's someone who doesn't have much reputation left these days (maybe because he had a hit record in the '60s - was perceived as selling out) - but for me on Kind of Blue he is more than a match for John Coltrane.



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