Author Topic: Bruckner's Abbey  (Read 498671 times)

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Offline Herman

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Re: Bruckner's Abbey
« Reply #3420 on: January 03, 2020, 12:29:19 PM »
In my personal impression both Mahler's and Bruckner's music have become far more popular, actually pretty much core repertoire (except for maybe Bruckner's 00-2 and alternative versions and maybe Mahler's 8th because of the forces needed) within the 3 decades I followed classical music.
[...]

I think there are still many listeners who don't care all that much about Bruckner (and/or Mahler). But they are popular with conductors and orchestras because one can demonstrate prowess in several departments without resorting to "shallow sonic spectacular" (like Rimsky ;). And for similar reasons the music is popular with audiophiles. And I also think that the nerdy males who dominate internet discussions have also considerable overlap with Bruckner/Mahler fandom.
So from recordings and the internet one can get the impression that almost everybody just loves Bruckner (or Mahler). But this is not the case. There is no composer/music loved by everyone, not even Bach or Beethoven.

Mahler of course is very popular, because of the emotional appeal and the orchestra spectacle.
Bruckner has neither and I don't think much changed in his popularity. He's still very much at the mercy of conductors who champion his work.

Offline Jo498

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Re: Bruckner's Abbey
« Reply #3421 on: January 03, 2020, 01:17:09 PM »
This does not at all agree with my impression of the last 30 years I followed classical music (and what I heard/read about the 30 years before that). When I started buying CDs in 1988 in a typical German CD store you had about three options for a Bruckner symphony (maybe a few more for 4, 7-9), Jochum, Karajan, Wand. For the alternative versions there was one (Inbal) or none.  Within these 30 years the Bruckner recordings grew exponentially, especially the choices for the ur- or alternative versions.
And of course, Bruckner has huge emotional appeal for some people and while spectactular only for the brass, it's certainly more spectacular than Haydn or Schumann...
Struck by the sounds before the sun,
I knew the night had gone.
The morning breeze like a bugle blew
Against the drums of dawn.
(Bob Dylan)

Offline Cato

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Re: Bruckner's Abbey
« Reply #3422 on: March 04, 2020, 06:42:30 AM »
The Columbus Symphony is playing Bruckner's Seventh Symphony this weekend, along with a Cello Concerto by an American cellist named Joshua Roman, whom the advertising describes as "mercurial."  0:)

It is unclear yet whether we will be able to attend.

The orchestra's conductor hails from Bulgaria: Rossen Milanov.  He has done well in my previous visits.

https://columbussymphony.com/events/calendar/profile.dT/peaks-of-beauty-and-devotion
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Offline SurprisedByBeauty

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Re: Bruckner's Abbey
« Reply #3423 on: March 06, 2020, 09:31:58 AM »
In my personal impression both Mahler's and Bruckner's music have become far more popular, actually pretty much core repertoire ...

Bruckner Symphonies, any given year, is more often programmed in Vienna than Beethoven Sys! So yes. He's come a long way!

Offline André

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Re: Bruckner's Abbey
« Reply #3424 on: March 06, 2020, 01:33:35 PM »
For many years, right up until the mid seventies I think, the Vienna Symphony (the Symphoniker) played Bruckner far more often than their colleagues at the Philharmonic (the WP).

Offline SurprisedByBeauty

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Re: Bruckner's Abbey
« Reply #3425 on: March 07, 2020, 03:17:20 AM »
For many years, right up until the mid-seventies I think, the Vienna Symphony (the Symphoniker) played Bruckner far more often than their colleagues at the Philharmonic (the WP).

I don't have the statistics on that; it's certainly true for Mahler (where I do have the statistics), where the Vienna renaissance really started with Bruno Walter's performance of the 2nd with the VSO in 1953, not only with Lennie dragging the VPO into it.

I'd like to say that Bruckner had an earlier start with the VPO, but again... that's just a hunch at this point.

Offline André

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Re: Bruckner's Abbey
« Reply #3426 on: March 07, 2020, 06:03:55 AM »
One of my high school buddies is a huge Bruckner fan, a regular contributor to John Berky’s website. He dug up the information from 1900 onward. I can ask him the stats, it would be interesting.

Offline André

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Re: Bruckner's Abbey
« Reply #3427 on: March 07, 2020, 05:19:07 PM »
One of my high school buddies is a huge Bruckner fan, a regular contributor to John Berky’s website. He dug up the information from 1900 onward. I can ask him the stats, it would be interesting.

Here's the link in Berky’s abruckner.com web site:

https://www.abruckner.com/editorsnote/listsanddata/houlegilles/


WS Bruckner performances consistently outnumbered those from the WP until the mid 1990s. The trend started right from the beginning (1900) under WS founder Ferdinand Löwe, a Bruckner pupil and advocate.

Offline Cato

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Re: Bruckner's Abbey
« Reply #3428 on: March 13, 2020, 12:52:03 PM »
A review of this recording elsewhere reminded me of this one from August in The Wall Street Journal
:

Excerpts:

Quote

...

Recorded live at Heinz Hall in Pittsburgh, (Manfred Honeck's) Bruckner Ninth is a wondrous achievement. Telling moments abound: the lyrical episodes in the opening movement that seemingly float in the air, the triumphant nobility the conductor summons at the first movement’s conclusion, the tonal colors he coaxes from the strings throughout—early in his career, Mr. Honeck was a violist with the Vienna Philharmonic—to name a few

...Mr. Honeck, also Catholic, brings his familiarity with the liturgy to his interpretation. For example, he envisions the third movement as based on the traditional Latin Mass “Agnus Dei” (Lamb of God) and provides his reasons in detailed liner notes. Others could easily hypothesize different underlying scenarios, but this peek under the hood shows how one conductor developed his concept of a score through repeated study and personal reflection. Helpful track timings are provided to help interested listeners follow along.....
..




See:

https://www.wsj.com/articles/demystifying-bruckners-ninth-11566329399

Has anyone heard this recording?  What say ye?   0:)
« Last Edit: March 13, 2020, 12:53:38 PM by Cato »
"Meet Miss Ruth Sherwood, from Columbus, Ohio, the Middle of the Universe!"

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Offline Daverz

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Re: Bruckner's Abbey
« Reply #3429 on: March 13, 2020, 12:55:26 PM »
Has anyone heard [Honeck's Bruckner 9] recording?  What say ye?   0:)

It's fantastic. 

Offline Roasted Swan

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Re: Bruckner's Abbey
« Reply #3430 on: March 15, 2020, 03:18:00 PM »
It's fantastic.

+1 - a triumphant combination of superb playing, glorious recording and a visionary interpretation.....

Offline André

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Re: Bruckner's Abbey
« Reply #3431 on: March 15, 2020, 03:25:35 PM »
I was very impressed too, but the impression that lingers is one of ‘in your face’ directness, as if I was stared at intently for 60 minutes.

Offline aukhawk

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Re: Bruckner's Abbey
« Reply #3432 on: March 16, 2020, 09:01:55 AM »
It's fantastic.

It's top of the tree, for me.

Offline André

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Re: Bruckner's Abbey
« Reply #3433 on: March 21, 2020, 03:50:11 PM »
Cross-posted from the WAYL2 thread:



Since no useful info is to be gleaned from the cover, here it is:

- Nitsch (that’s his name): Für Anton Bruckner, a 23 minute work for solo organ.
- Bruckner: symphony no 5.

The European Philharmonic Orchestra is conducted by Pierre-Jean Marthé. Both works were played and recorded in the Stiftsbasilika Ottobeuren, in Bavaria, on August 7, 2007.

The organ work is a static, uneventful affair.

Marthé leads a somnambulistic performance and retouches the score here and there (cymbals and triangle in the slow movement). There is almost no sense of forward motion. Marthé’s Bruckner exists in a far away place where music notes practice social distancing. I suspect he set out to out-zen Celibidache. 3 of the 4 movements are longer than Celi’s longest performance. Conductor and orchestra shake the heavens in the coda (cymbal clashes again).

Offline André

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Re: Bruckner's Abbey
« Reply #3434 on: April 08, 2020, 04:51:28 PM »

A curiosity, the symphony of a childhood friend of Bruckner’s, Ignaz Dorn. Dorn called the work : « Labyrinth-Bilder oder Traum und Erwachen. Characteristische Sinfonie. » (Labyrinth Images or Dream and Awakening. Characteristic Symphony.)

It is interpreted by the renowned Bruckner conductor, Takashi Asahina. The sound is so-so, but I think it’s worth a hearing. The duration is 27 minutes and the music is packed with colour and drama.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-AlYZJvl5Uw&feature=youtu.be

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: Bruckner's Abbey
« Reply #3435 on: April 22, 2020, 11:32:17 AM »
Is it heresy, if I find that Herreweghe leading l'Orchestre des Champs-Élysées may be my favorite account of the Fourth?
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
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His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Offline Sergeant Rock

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Re: Bruckner's Abbey
« Reply #3436 on: April 22, 2020, 11:38:52 AM »
Is it heresy, if I find that Herreweghe leading l'Orchestre des Champs-Élysées may be my favorite account of the Fourth?

Yes. Karajan EMI or Celi should be your favorite  >:(

 Sarge  ;D
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Mahler, you ought to go see it.
he was as f*cked-up as you are."
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Offline André

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Re: Bruckner's Abbey
« Reply #3437 on: May 01, 2020, 02:39:45 AM »
John Berky’s website has this picture on its welcome page:



And, more importantly, the download of the month for May 2020 is the 4th symphony under Gerd Albrecht (Czech Philharmonic Orchestra).

Flac files available here:
https://www.abruckner.com/downloads/downloadofthemonth/May20/

Offline Roasted Swan

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Re: Bruckner's Abbey
« Reply #3438 on: May 02, 2020, 07:18:31 AM »
John Berky’s website has this picture on its welcome page:



And, more importantly, the download of the month for May 2020 is the 4th symphony under Gerd Albrecht (Czech Philharmonic Orchestra).

Flac files available here:
https://www.abruckner.com/downloads/downloadofthemonth/May20/


Thanks for the heads up re the download.  I heard the Czech PO perform Bruckner 7 live in the Rudolfinum with Inbal a few years backs - their sound really suits this music.

Offline André

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Re: Bruckner's Abbey
« Reply #3439 on: May 02, 2020, 09:18:10 AM »
Thanks for the heads up re the download.  I heard the Czech PO perform Bruckner 7 live in the Rudolfinum with Inbal a few years backs - their sound really suits this music.

As for me, I heard Albrecht conduct the original version of the 8th in Brussels (not with the CzPO), and I can attest he is a good brucknerian. So, if you combine the two, it’s a tempting proposition !  :)