Author Topic: Karol Szymanowski (1882-1937)  (Read 55416 times)

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snyprrr

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Re: Karol Szymanowski (1882-1937)
« Reply #200 on: August 21, 2017, 06:54:04 PM »
Listened to the first part of Symphony 3 from the old Koch release (with Stefania W. singing, of Gorecki fame). The recording is clean, like an ECM issue, but that doesn't keep the music from wallowing in luxurious textures. This whole thing sounds a lot like the 'chirping and cooing music' of le Sacre, no? (somewhere in the intro to Part 2)

I might have to reevaluate Szymmie... the 3rd Symphony seems a bit- conservative- to me at this point. The String Quartets let me down with their finales (where are they, must find them). I hold out that at least one of the Violin Concertos holds the perfumed luxuries that I know I must have heard at some time. My above recollection that it reminded me of the "chirping and cooing" of 'Le Sacre...' makes me again curious. What is TheBEST?

nodogen

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Re: Karol Szymanowski (1882-1937)
« Reply #201 on: August 21, 2017, 10:03:10 PM »
I feel duty-bound to say I recommend these wholeheartedly:


(4 CD set)

and


(together with Rozycki)
« Last Edit: August 21, 2017, 10:07:21 PM by nodogen »

SymphonicAddict

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Re: Karol Szymanowski (1882-1937)
« Reply #202 on: August 22, 2017, 09:48:03 AM »
I feel duty-bound to say I recommend these wholeheartedly:


(4 CD set)

and


(together with Rozycki)

The string quartets are simply astounding, arguably comparable with those by Bartók (especially the 2nd one).

nodogen

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Re: Karol Szymanowski (1882-1937)
« Reply #203 on: August 22, 2017, 10:03:09 AM »
The string quartets are simply astounding, arguably comparable with those by Bartók (especially the 2nd one).

They are indeed. Think Bartok's just have the edge, for me (especially 3 and 4).

snyprrr

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Re: Karol Szymanowski (1882-1937) SQ No.1 in C Major (1917)
« Reply #204 on: August 24, 2017, 05:31:25 AM »
String Quartet No.1 (1917)


Took the Wilanow/PolskiNigrana with me, only had No.1. Well, again, my previous recollections persisted: at this point I would rather hear the Ravel or either of the two Janacek- KS has the overripe sexuality going on, but it sounds so swooning, so feminine,- but, a femininity that seems just too sickly sweet, too overripe. Too "this" and too "that", but not enough of either for me.

It also seems like solo violin+trio, somewhat old fashioned. I mean, I remember when I first heard KS, I waaas bowled over by this (is it 'sensual' or 'sensuous'???) effect. Now, with modern techniques, we can surely do KS one better, though I don't know of anyone who is so sexually oriented in their music- Bussotti's music doesn't "sound" sexual the way KS's does...

AND, yes, the finale is still JUST a finale, in the old fashioned sense. All of the perfume is gone and it's just a little rondo-type thing finale. I just need moreMoreMORE!!!


OK, I'll go for Violin Concerto No.1: Zimmermann or Tetzlaff?

Offline Todd

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Re: Karol Szymanowski (1882-1937) SQ No.1 in C Major (1917)
« Reply #205 on: August 24, 2017, 05:32:43 AM »
OK, I'll go for Violin Concerto No.1: Zimmermann or Tetzlaff?


Zimmermann.
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snyprrr

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Re: Karol Szymanowski (1882-1937) VIOLIN CONCERTO NO.1
« Reply #206 on: August 24, 2017, 06:04:54 AM »
Violin Concerto No.1

OK, I'm starting, BUUUT, wait... what is this?? The actual opening is a verbatim rip of the intro to 'Le Sacre'??? Or, no, it's the 'Firebird' introduction music! Right?

Going between Zimmermann and Mordkovitch, Zimmermann seeming a little more sexxxy... Tetzlaff, too,... eh, I just can't get into KS anymore, that seems to be the end of it. I'd rather hear Ravel or Janacek. I certainly consider KS to be one of the greater Composers of the era, but, the techniques to take his vision over the top had not been really introduced yet, so, I find his ecstasy somewhat under-swooning. And, no, I can't think of a Composer that comes close to his vision, except Messaien, who, of course, come to ecstasy from a completely different viewpoint.


I'm sorry, Karol :(

Offline Mr Bloom

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Re: Karol Szymanowski (1882-1937) VIOLIN CONCERTO NO.1
« Reply #207 on: August 26, 2017, 09:44:29 AM »
Violin Concerto No.1

OK, I'm starting, BUUUT, wait... what is this?? The actual opening is a verbatim rip of the intro to 'Le Sacre'??? Or, no, it's the 'Firebird' introduction music! Right?

No. Like, not at all.

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: Karol Szymanowski (1882-1937)
« Reply #208 on: August 26, 2017, 11:33:52 AM »
Oh, you mustn’t mind snypsss, really.  All of us know not to.
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SymphonicAddict

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Re: Karol Szymanowski (1882-1937)
« Reply #209 on: March 18, 2018, 12:38:07 PM »


Yesterday I listened to the act I from King Roger. I didn't expect something so utterly spectacular and divine. This is some music that is beyond words, mindblowing. It was truly thrilling.

It's a work that remembers me of Scriabin and Ravel's music in places, also imbued with an exotic/mystic appeal. If the rest of this opera is like that, I'll have a great deal of enjoyment.

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Karol Szymanowski (1882-1937)
« Reply #210 on: March 18, 2018, 12:42:54 PM »


Yesterday I listened to the act I from King Roger. I didn't expect something so utterly spectacular and divine. This is some music that is beyond words, mindblowing. It was truly thrilling.

It's a work that remembers me of Scriabin and Ravel's music in places, also imbued with an exotic/mystic appeal. If the rest of this opera is like that, I'll have a great deal of enjoyment.

YES! Król Roger is indeed a fine opera and, in fact, one of Szymanowski’s crowning achievements. I haven’t heard Rattle’s performance in ages, but I suppose one reason why I haven’t is the excellence of this recording:

“Competitions are for horses, not artists.”


SymphonicAddict

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Re: Karol Szymanowski (1882-1937)
« Reply #211 on: March 18, 2018, 12:55:03 PM »
YES! Król Roger is indeed a fine opera and, in fact, one of Szymanowski’s crowning achievements. I haven’t heard Rattle’s performance in ages, but I suppose one reason why I haven’t is the excellence of this recording:



The Rattle's rendition sounds convincing so far. Surely I'll have to listen the recording you mention to compare at some point. I really want to continue delighting myself with this sheer beauty.

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Karol Szymanowski (1882-1937)
« Reply #212 on: March 18, 2018, 01:08:24 PM »
The Rattle's rendition sounds convincing so far. Surely I'll have to listen the recording you mention to compare at some point. I really want to continue delighting myself with this sheer beauty.

Sounds like a good plan to me. :)
“Competitions are for horses, not artists.”


SymphonicAddict

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Re: Karol Szymanowski (1882-1937)
« Reply #213 on: March 22, 2018, 04:38:32 PM »
At last I've been able to pay attention to the whole King Roger opera. First of all, I'm not a huge opera fan, but this work worked very well for me. Those ecstatic choruses, a top-notch orchestration, an engaging exoticism, sensuous harmonies, powerful climaxes... The experience was tremendous. A really stupendous work withouth reservations.

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Karol Szymanowski (1882-1937)
« Reply #214 on: March 22, 2018, 07:15:02 PM »
At last I've been able to pay attention to the whole King Roger opera. First of all, I'm not a huge opera fan, but this work worked very well for me. Those ecstatic choruses, a top-notch orchestration, an engaging exoticism, sensuous harmonies, powerful climaxes... The experience was tremendous. A really stupendous work withouth reservations.

I can only nod my head in agreement. I’m not much of an opera fan either, but there are some exceptions: Debussy’s Pelléas et Mélisande, Ravel’s L'enfant et les sortilèges, Bartók’s Bluebeard’s Castle, Martinů’s Julietta and Ariane, Berg’s Wozzeck, and Janáček’s The Cunning Little Vixen, From the House of the Dead and Káťa Kabanová. I feel the same way about Król Roger.
« Last Edit: March 23, 2018, 06:59:01 AM by Mirror Image »
“Competitions are for horses, not artists.”


Offline vandermolen

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Re: Karol Szymanowski (1882-1937)
« Reply #215 on: March 22, 2018, 11:37:39 PM »
I'm not an opera fan either but the music I've heard from 'King Roger' is impressive. Other operas I like are two by Vaughan Williams 'Riders to the Sea' and 'Pilgrim's Progress' plus Mussorgsky's 'Boris Godunov' and Martinu's 'Julietta'.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

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cilgwyn

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Re: Karol Szymanowski (1882-1937)
« Reply #216 on: March 23, 2018, 01:32:59 AM »
You really do need to get into the operas of Richard Strauss,don't you,vandermolen?!! ;D
The small selection you enjoy intrigues me,though. If you like those,is it beyond the realm of possibilities,that this could increase by,say,another,one or two?! Have you ever tried Brian's wildly eccentric,The Tigers? Or,what about Martinu's The Greek Passion. I bought a s/h musicassette set of the opera,when I was a youngster (which I still possess). I remember that what I really liked about it,in the old Supraphon recording,were the sounds of Martinu's orchestration. I would put it on a level with the orchestration in his Sixth symphony. I found it quite startling. Almost hallucinatory. The textures are so vivid. They really grab.....tickle the old ear 'oles. (And his use of voices is stunning,too). Never mind the story!! Even my father,who doesn't care for music much,enjoyed the sounds he was hearing! At the time,it was like no other opera,I had heard. And I don't usually like operas with unhappy endings!! ::) ;D

Erm,back to Szymanowski!! :-[ ;D

cilgwyn

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Re: Karol Szymanowski (1882-1937)
« Reply #217 on: March 23, 2018, 02:13:07 AM »
I can see Mirror Image posting,that The Greek Passion,isn't one of the works,by Martinu,that have impressed him. I'm not so sure about the consistency of inspiration,or the libretto;it's just the sounds of Martinu's orchestration that really grabbed me,in this instance. I think it's quite stunning in places. I'll admit the story is a bit gloomy for my liking! ::) ;D I like opera;but I never follow the libretto. A quick peruse of the synopsis is enough for me. I just sit back and enjoy the sounds!! That shows how dumb I am!! :-[ ;D

Offline Biffo

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Re: Karol Szymanowski (1882-1937)
« Reply #218 on: March 23, 2018, 02:59:02 AM »
I heard King Roger at ENO back in the 1970s and it made a peculiar impression on me. It is a strong drama but the music didn't seem to add very much - it would have worked as a play. Since then I have got to know Szymanowski better. Occasionally, mentions of KR in forums has tempted me to try again but I have never got round to it. This latest burst of enthusiasm and recommendations has reawakened my interest so perhaps I will give it a go once I have cleared some of my backlog of baroque opera, Langgaard, Georges Pretre, Koechlin etc.

Offline Cato

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Re: Karol Szymanowski (1882-1937)
« Reply #219 on: March 23, 2018, 06:31:08 AM »

You really do need to get into the operas of Richard Strauss...


One word: Elektra !

For those new to him, Szymanowski seems to blend certain tendencies in Strauss with those of e.g. Scriabin and produces his own highly individual idiom, eclectic yet leading to a vibrant originality.
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