Author Topic: Five composers who you wish had lived longer.  (Read 1616 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline vandermolen

  • Silver Subscriber
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 14286
  • Location: Rotherfield, Sussex, UK
Re: Five composers who you wish had lived longer.
« Reply #20 on: August 17, 2019, 02:35:10 AM »
Lili Boulanger (an immensely original talent cut off in her prime)
Finzi (maybe we would’ve gotten more large-scale works from him if the epic Cello Concerto written right before his death is any indication)
Korngold (so he could’ve completed that 2nd symphony! The Symphony in F-sharp shows that he was developing a deeper, darker style than in his previous works.)
Magnard (the stunning 4th Symphony shows that he was continually developing and refining his unique style. Imagine if we had a few more symphonies by him?)
Schubert (needs no explanation)

Agree with all these. I've been listening a lot recently to Schubert's 'Unfinished Symphony' which I like more and more.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

Offline kyjo

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1892
  • Kurt Atterberg (1887-1974)
  • Location: United States
Re: Five composers who you wish had lived longer.
« Reply #21 on: August 18, 2019, 08:35:43 AM »
Lili Boulanger (an immensely original talent cut off in her prime)
Finzi (maybe we would’ve gotten more large-scale works from him if the epic Cello Concerto written right before his death is any indication)
Korngold (so he could’ve completed that 2nd symphony! The Symphony in F-sharp shows that he was developing a deeper, darker style than in his previous works.)
Magnard (the stunning 4th Symphony shows that he was continually developing and refining his unique style. Imagine if we had a few more symphonies by him?)
Schubert (needs no explanation)

Two bonus choices for me: Kalinnikov and Karlowicz.
"Music is enough for a lifetime, but a lifetime is not enough for music" - Sergei Rachmaninoff

Offline kyjo

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1892
  • Kurt Atterberg (1887-1974)
  • Location: United States
Re: Five composers who you wish had lived longer.
« Reply #22 on: August 18, 2019, 08:37:38 AM »
Agree with all these. I've been listening a lot recently to Schubert's 'Unfinished Symphony' which I like more and more.

Do you know Schubert's String Quintet in C major, Jeffrey? I know you're not usually one for pre-20th century chamber music, but it's a deeply eloquent work I think you'd enjoy.
"Music is enough for a lifetime, but a lifetime is not enough for music" - Sergei Rachmaninoff

Offline SymphonicAddict

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 2210
Re: Five composers who you wish had lived longer.
« Reply #23 on: August 18, 2019, 04:59:47 PM »
Two bonus choices for me: Kalinnikov and Karlowicz.

Oh yes! Two potential talents who died too early. More Kalinnikov symphonies would have been more than welcome. Ditto Karlowicz.

Offline vandermolen

  • Silver Subscriber
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 14286
  • Location: Rotherfield, Sussex, UK
Re: Five composers who you wish had lived longer.
« Reply #24 on: August 18, 2019, 09:56:55 PM »
Do you know Schubert's String Quintet in C major, Jeffrey? I know you're not usually one for pre-20th century chamber music, but it's a deeply eloquent work I think you'd enjoy.

No, but will look out for it Kyle. Thanks for the recommendation.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

Offline Madiel

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 7252
    • A musical diary
  • Location: Canberra, Australia
  • Currently Listening to:
    Whatever's listed in my blog.
Re: Five composers who you wish had lived longer.
« Reply #25 on: August 19, 2019, 02:06:08 AM »
To that end, this is one of my favourite purchases of recent years.

I am now working on a discography of the works of Vagn Holmboe. Please visit and also contribute!

Offline Andy D.

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 189
  • Location: Winooski
Re: Five composers who you wish had lived longer.
« Reply #26 on: August 26, 2019, 03:00:17 AM »
In spite of Mozart wrote countless masterpieces, I didn't include him on this list because his style wasn't changing radically that much (maybe I'm wrong, but it's what I kind of feel).


Mozart stuck to the forms Papa Joe had already more than established. The thing is, I think the former might have changed later in the life much the same way LvB did.

LvB's early material was at times practically identical to Mozart and Haydn's efforts, but with his middle period on he became increasingly more personal (and ended up completely superseding the earlier efforts by way of).

I think if Mozart had lived on he would have experienced the same kind of thing. The Requiem (the stuff he wrote, of course) doesn't really knock down any longstanding doors, but there's something so much more personal and so much less Haydn in that composition. Something darker than anything he'd ever written besides the also-later-period Don Giovanni.

In my eyes, had Mozart made the same, trailblazing moves LvB did, he might have eclipsed the latter (certainly through the eyes of history). Sadly, time ran out.

Offline Jo498

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 4378
  • Location: Germany
Re: Five composers who you wish had lived longer.
« Reply #27 on: August 26, 2019, 03:15:43 AM »
Church Music was and is rarely the genre for doing something revolutionary new. (The Mozart Requiem owes more to Handel than to Haydn).

Mozart was highly innovative, but mostly in piano concerto and opera. He did not quite succeed in transforming the staid opera seria despite a masterpiece like Idomeneo but he transformed the opera buffa into something that was not merely light entertainment but emotionally serious comedy of manners. And he created German opera, albeit in the form of a fairy tale piece with some silly aspects (Magic flute)
Struck by the sounds before the sun,
I knew the night had gone.
The morning breeze like a bugle blew
Against the drums of dawn.
(Bob Dylan)

Offline Andy D.

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 189
  • Location: Winooski
Re: Five composers who you wish had lived longer.
« Reply #28 on: August 26, 2019, 03:40:17 AM »
Mozart's idea of German opera was awfully close to the Italian idea, throughout most of his career. Give even a cursory listen to  the Italians before to hear how similar they really were (the differences were superseded by the similarities).

As to the church music, yes just as much Handel and Sebastian as Haydn...but was there anything as dramatic as his Requiem? I'd love to  find that one out.

I like that you mentioned the piano concerti and perhaps he did add some important, new-ish ideas. But nobody broke away from those forms anywhere near like Beethoven did.

Mozart wrote under Emperial rule, and the powers that be wanted people to not think too much. Mozart had no choice but to accommodate that, especially given his spending habits.


Offline Andy D.

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 189
  • Location: Winooski
Re: Five composers who you wish had lived longer.
« Reply #29 on: August 26, 2019, 03:57:41 AM »
In a way, Mozart was a Pop composer. His spending habits made it so he had to adhere to a certain set of (Italians-and-Haydn-pioneered) forms.

That said, Mozart might have been the most sensational melody writer in the history of music (somehow I doubt I'll get much thrift over that assertion) and a freakily great composer.

It's more what he did with the pre-existent forms. That will never die.

Offline SymphonicAddict

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 2210
Re: Five composers who you wish had lived longer.
« Reply #30 on: August 26, 2019, 10:28:11 AM »
Mozart stuck to the forms Papa Joe had already more than established. The thing is, I think the former might have changed later in the life much the same way LvB did.

LvB's early material was at times practically identical to Mozart and Haydn's efforts, but with his middle period on he became increasingly more personal (and ended up completely superseding the earlier efforts by way of).

I think if Mozart had lived on he would have experienced the same kind of thing. The Requiem (the stuff he wrote, of course) doesn't really knock down any longstanding doors, but there's something so much more personal and so much less Haydn in that composition. Something darker than anything he'd ever written besides the also-later-period Don Giovanni.

In my eyes, had Mozart made the same, trailblazing moves LvB did, he might have eclipsed the latter (certainly through the eyes of history). Sadly, time ran out.

Good point, the Requiem was his turning point towards a more personal style. It would have been interesting because Mozart wrote mostly "happy" works, works in major keys, not many in minor ones. I think that is a feature why I am a bit reluctant to Mozart. His works are too optimistic for my taste, but of course, his genius is undeniable.