Author Topic: the Piano Quintet by Irgens-Jensen (1894-1969) - recording?  (Read 2250 times)

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Offline Scion7

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the Piano Quintet by Irgens-Jensen (1894-1969) - recording?
« on: November 03, 2014, 10:10:28 PM »
I've heard a couple of mentions about this piece on the radio,  and found this from The Independent from 1999:

" The work that should have been brought to London was the Piano Quintet by Ludvig Irgens Jensen (1894-1969), Norway's greatest composer; it was performed in Risor this year for the first time anywhere since 1944. Instead, the Wigmore series closed with the Schumann Quintet, played by Julian Rachlin, Kuusisto, Tomter and Jan-Erik Gustafsson, with Enrico Pace at the piano. All week I had resented the Schumann its usurpation of Irgens Jensen's place on the programme - "

Has anyone seen a recording of the work?
Heard if one is in the works and scheduled for release?
« Last Edit: November 04, 2014, 08:33:39 AM by Scion7 »
The Germans, who make doctrines out of everything, deal with music learnedly; the Italians, being voluptuous, seek in it lively, though fleeting, sensations; the French, more vain than perceptive, manage to speak of it wittily; and the English pay for it . . . - Stendhal

Offline Scion7

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Re: the Piano Quintet by Irgens-Jensen - some notes from his Biography
« Reply #1 on: November 04, 2014, 08:30:56 AM »
PIANO QUINTET

After the success of the Violin Sonata and the Variations and Fugue, I-J was doubtless relieved to find public interest dying down again.  And by 1927 he was working on his Piano Quintet.  The date of its completion is unknown; it was not premiered until Feb 2, 1932, by the pianist Ivar Johnsen and the string quartet of the Oslo Philharmonic (Ernst Glaser, Oscar Holst, Bjarne Brustad and Guillaume Hesse). In the programme notes for that performance, he gave a succinct description of the work:

   The style is polyphonic and has a serious character.  The chorale which the material leads into, is the basic idea of the work, which all the thematic material is related to and derived from. The first movement is kept in sonata form.  The main theme is strictly delineated and is frequently used as a cantus firmus, but the 2nd theme is syncopated and has a more lively character. The coda is formed as a rapidly moving fugato. The siciliano-lik middle movement leads directly into the last section, which is introduced by the chorale. This gives way to an impetuous motif which is developed in a restless hurry; later a ponderous march theme also turns up.  The finale gradually brings in all the earlier material.


In the company of Brustad's  Capricii  for violin and viola and Svendsen's Octet, the Quintet was so well received that the concert had to be repeated a week later.  The same spring (in May) the Quintet and its musicians scored a success also at the Scandinavian Music Days in Helsinki.
The Piano Quintet was performed at a private concert during WW2, but more than half a century passed before it was heard again, whtn the Risor Chamber Music Festival programmed it in 1999, in a performance by pianist Gonzalo Moreno and an all-female quartet:  Elise Batnes & Katrin Buvarp-violins, Nora Taksdal-viola, and Ellen Flesjo-cello.  The concert was broadcast on NRK and some minor stations in the USA. Ther performance was very well received by the public.
Criti Idar Karevold wrote:  "This is a vigorous work written in the best classical tradition and with a wide-ranging and demanding piano part ... It is lamentable that it has not found a standard place in the repertoire, at least for Norwegian ensembles. The genre of piano quintet is a rarity in the worklists of Norwegian composers, and I-J's contribution is unique in its kind."
Now that the first performance of the Piano Quintet outside Norway has taken place*, and the first commercial recording is under discussion, it seems certain that this work will live on and enjoy further performances.

*Concert Hall of the Pancho Vladigerov National Academy of Music, Sofia, Bulgaria; Oyvind Aase and the Frosch String Quartet, Oct 3, 2012

In the larger works (the Piano Quintet, the Violin Sonata, the Symphony in D-minor, even Heimferd) he makes much use of sonata and rondo form.

- - - - -

So, I'm interested.   :)
« Last Edit: November 04, 2014, 08:50:23 AM by Scion7 »
The Germans, who make doctrines out of everything, deal with music learnedly; the Italians, being voluptuous, seek in it lively, though fleeting, sensations; the French, more vain than perceptive, manage to speak of it wittily; and the English pay for it . . . - Stendhal

Offline Scion7

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I was PM'd by a GUEST - so
« Reply #2 on: February 14, 2016, 04:03:25 PM »
Since you are not registered, I cannot reply to what you left, Mr. Lars-Thomas Holm  - sorry.
The Germans, who make doctrines out of everything, deal with music learnedly; the Italians, being voluptuous, seek in it lively, though fleeting, sensations; the French, more vain than perceptive, manage to speak of it wittily; and the English pay for it . . . - Stendhal

Offline (poco) Sforzando

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Offline Scion7

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« Last Edit: March 28, 2017, 08:01:25 PM by Scion7 »
The Germans, who make doctrines out of everything, deal with music learnedly; the Italians, being voluptuous, seek in it lively, though fleeting, sensations; the French, more vain than perceptive, manage to speak of it wittily; and the English pay for it . . . - Stendhal

Offline LTH

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Re: the Piano Quintet by Irgens-Jensen (1894-1969) - recording?
« Reply #5 on: May 11, 2020, 08:15:19 AM »
I've heard a couple of mentions about this piece on the radio,  and found this from The Independent from 1999:

" The work that should have been brought to London was the Piano Quintet by Ludvig Irgens Jensen (1894-1969), Norway's greatest composer; it was performed in Risor this year for the first time anywhere since 1944. Instead, the Wigmore series closed with the Schumann Quintet, played by Julian Rachlin, Kuusisto, Tomter and Jan-Erik Gustafsson, with Enrico Pace at the piano. All week I had resented the Schumann its usurpation of Irgens Jensen's place on the programme - "

Has anyone seen a recording of the work?
Heard if one is in the works and scheduled for release?

I got a recording of this. PM me please :)
Best wishes

LTH
PhD Research Fellow on Irgens-Jensen