What are you listening 2 now?

Started by Gurn Blanston, September 23, 2019, 05:45:22 AM

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Gurn Blanston

This something we have been through before, the old WAYLTN? thread has gotten huge, and it isn't helping things for the database to have to read it every time someone goes there. This, coupled with the very odd warning from Google has compelled me to lock the old thread and we shall start anew. On topic, I am listening to some rarely heard Mozart:

Visit my Haydn blog: HaydnSeek

Haydn: that genius of vulgar music who induces an inordinate thirst for beer - Mily Balakirev (1860)

Florestan

Make it sticky, Gurn, make it sticky!
"Art is no excuse for boring people." - Jules Renard

Gurn Blanston

Quote from: Florestan on September 23, 2019, 05:49:40 AM
Make it sticky, Gurn, make it sticky!

Like I haven't heard THAT before... ::)   Anyway, it is. The other is locked and will fade away, but if you are able to still visit it (I can't) feel free. I suspect that the fact I use Chrome merely aids and abets the warning issue.

8)
Visit my Haydn blog: HaydnSeek

Haydn: that genius of vulgar music who induces an inordinate thirst for beer - Mily Balakirev (1860)

Madiel

I suspect the warning thing was connected with a particular page element like a linked image.

Anyway, I've decided that the last thing I'll listen to tonight, and hence the first thing I'll contribute to this thread, is the kind of work that every "crossover" aspires to be.

Sarah Kirkland Snider, Penelope.

I am now working on a discography of the works of Vagn Holmboe. Please visit and also contribute!

Harry

YAY it works again, thanks Gurn!

English Music, CD VII.

Henry Purcell.
Theatre Music, Part III.


What a constant pleasure this music is. And Although I heard it all on LP in the olden days, it still thrills me.
Be kind, be friendly, but above all be human in a positive way.

Harry

Madrigals and Songs.
CD VIII.

John Coprario.

Funeral Teares and Consort Music.


As with the English Music, this box is full of pleasant memories, I even get a bit sentimental now......
Be kind, be friendly, but above all be human in a positive way.

Harry

#6
Unfortunately, the site gets very slow again, guests are appearing out of nowhere, and hey presto, it takes 3 minutes to get in the post section.

CD IX

Partitas from secondary sources, Part IV.


A pleasure this box!
Be kind, be friendly, but above all be human in a positive way.

k a rl h e nn i ng

First in a looooong while:

Tom Beghin The Virtual Haydn
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

ChopinBroccoli



Shostakovich 5

This is a level-headed, clear-eyed interpretation... it doesn't have the Mahlerian pathos of Bernstein nor the intensity of Mravinsky's best renditions, nor does it have Haitink's cold austerity... the first movement is faithfully moderato

But what playing! It's the best played 5th I've heard (and I've heard dozens) ... just astonishing control, dynamics and precision... sound quality is superb

I've now purchased it without even listening to the Tchaikovsky (which I trust will be similarly amazing)
"If it ain't Baroque, don't fix it!"
- Handel

Gurn Blanston

Quote from: k a rl h e nn i ng on September 23, 2019, 06:58:32 AM
First in a looooong while:

Tom Beghin The Virtual Haydn

Ah, splendid, splendid. Even though it is somewhat austere, I really like that set a lot!

For me:




8)
Visit my Haydn blog: HaydnSeek

Haydn: that genius of vulgar music who induces an inordinate thirst for beer - Mily Balakirev (1860)

Cato

Quote from: "Harry" on September 23, 2019, 06:35:59 AM

Unfortunately, the site gets very slow again, guests are appearing out of nowhere, and hey presto, it takes 3 minutes to get in the post section.


Amen!  0:)

On the radio today...

Schubert: Symphony #5

Bamberg Symphony Orchestra conducted by Jonathan Nott

Nice performance: very jaunty first movement!
"Meet Miss Ruth Sherwood, from Columbus, Ohio, the Middle of the Universe!"

- Brian Aherne introducing Rosalind Russell in  My Sister Eileen (1942)

Biffo

Schubert: Fantasy in C major Wanderer - Julius Katchen piano - fine performance, one to add to my collection.

SimonNZ



Jonathan Harvey - Mortuos Plango, Vivos Voco

Que

#13


Johannes Leertouwer and Julian Reynolds in the Beethoven sonatas.

Marc

Chopin: Mazurka in A minor "Notre Temps", played by Marian Mika.

The rest of the disc, with other works of Chopin, will follow, no doubt.
(Brilliant Classics 93202/13)

And I surely hope that "notre temps" on GMG will be better soon... without spies, hackers, bots and all that shit.


Daverz

An thrilling live recording of Dvorak Symphony No. 6 with the Czech Philharmonic:


Maestro267

RIP the old thread, long live the new thread! (Well, as long as the servers can hold it.)

Penderecki: Symphony No. 3
Polish NRSO/Wit

Adams: Harmonielehre
Montreal SO/Nagano

j winter

Jumping around a bit this morning....





Brandenburgs for guitar trio



Water Music x 2


The man that hath no music in himself,
Nor is not moved with concord of sweet sounds,
Is fit for treasons, stratagems, and spoils.
The motions of his spirit are dull as night,
And his affections dark as Erebus.
Let no such man be trusted.

-- William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice

André



The Requiem.

There's no mention anywhere that these recordings have been remastered. They date back 1949-1961. Most are in stereo, as is the case here. This was taped in Symphony Hall in April 1959, all of 60 years ago. Much to my surprise the sound is very, very good. Uncluttered, with well-spaced stereo, no peaking, no distortion, no fizz, no hiss, no pre-echo. There is a nice spatial spread to the voices: basses and sopranos to the left, mezzos and tenors to the right. Very easy to follow the choral lines. Of course the dynamic range may be slightly less wide than on more modern recordings, but in all conscience I can only say that, as a recording, this is very successful. So far I had this only as a download transferred onto cdr, so no match for this fine product.

Munch's interpretation is legendary, and justly so. I also have his later BRSO recording, a rather different kind of interpretation. In Boston he is on home turf, working with his own orchestra and the well-honed New England Conservatory Chorus and its fabulous director Lorna Cooke de Varon. Collectively they could start working on fine points of expression instead of going through the more lengthy and arduous process of starting from scratch. This is a very intense interpretation, extraordinarily focused, unfurling at what seems a quite steady pace. Munch's Offertory is an urgent plea, with beautiful wind curls. In all the other movements he leans slightly on the slower side of average.

The participation of Léopold Simoneau in the Sanctus has always been praised to the skies and rightly so. This is a hugely difficult solo. The top of the voice must sound honeyed, sweet and utterly free of any strain. In the Book of Isaiah the words of the Sanctus are thundered forth by a bunch of six-winged seraphims whose voice move the foundations of heaven. Not exactly what Berlioz offers ! No matter, this is a moment of pure beauty and I wouldn't want it any different.

Colin Davis recorded the work multiple times (4 or more) and I still consider his first, LSO recording as the most formidable of all. Munch's BRSO account is almost as good as the Boston, except for his tenor and the last degree of passion in the playing. McCreesh is a spine tingling affair, dramatic in the extreme. Still, this BSO version retains my affection and I simply can't find anything to detract from my enjoyment.

Traverso