Author Topic: What are you listening 2 now?  (Read 1020665 times)

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Offline steve ridgway

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Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #37780 on: April 14, 2021, 08:29:52 AM »
Penderecki - Capriccio For Violin And Orchestra.


Offline Dry Brett Kavanaugh

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Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #37781 on: April 14, 2021, 08:59:28 AM »
Benjamin Yusupov (born 1962)
'Nola' Concerto for various Flutes and String Orchestra - a most enjoyable work, which eventually seems to turn into what sounds like an Israeli folk dance. I've had to play it three times in a row. An imaginative two CD set if you fancy something different (also features music by Kancheli, Amirov and Terteryan):

Here is 'Nola' on You Tube:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AoG4sl36wXY

Love the entire set!
« Last Edit: April 14, 2021, 09:02:01 AM by Dry Brett Kavanaugh »

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #37782 on: April 14, 2021, 09:02:02 AM »
NP:

Strauss
Don Quixote, Op. 35
Paul Tortelier, cello
Staatskapelle Dresden
Kempe


From this set:

Don’t forget your four A’s, folks: Alex, Arnie, Alban and Anton


Offline Fritz Kobus

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Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #37783 on: April 14, 2021, 09:34:18 AM »
Always felt that Gardiner's Eroica is excellent.  Now I have a chance to listen to the whole cycle as this was gifted to me by a member of another music forum who got a bigger Gardiner Beethoven set which made this set superfluous to them.  Wonderful.  One of the best Eroicas out there.

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #37784 on: April 14, 2021, 10:17:24 AM »
Prokoviev Classical Symphony, Giulini conducting the Chicago




Sarge

Sweet!
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
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[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #37785 on: April 14, 2021, 10:45:19 AM »
Stravinsky
Disc 19: Oratorio—Melodrama Vol. 2

Perséphone
Ode
Monumentum pro Gesualdo di Venosa ad CD annum


Neither the Ode nor the Monumentum fits the Volume’s designation, as they are both instrumental.  I listened to a lot of Stravinsky beginning in my undergrad years, but Perséphone was the last substantial work upon which I turned attention.  I love it.

Stravinsky was so frequently, so reliably creative and inventive, it seems unfair to thrash him for those rare occasions he ‘phoned it in,’ but anything he says in the Ode, he said more substantively elsewhere.  Eric Walter White observes: Dedicated to the memory of Natalie Koussevitzky [...] When Natalie died, her husband set up a Foundation to commission new works in her memory. In 1943 Stravinsky received one of these commissions and decided to erite a tripytych for orchestra. At that time, the Eclogue (the second piece in the triptych) was already in existence, as it had been composed for an abortive film project (Orson Welles’s Jane Eyre)

The performance here by the Clevelanders is certainly excellent.

For me, the Monumentum is one of the peaks of his neoclassical output.
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #37786 on: April 14, 2021, 10:58:08 AM »
Stravinsky
Disc 19: Oratorio—Melodrama Vol. 2

Perséphone
Ode
Monumentum pro Gesualdo di Venosa ad CD annum


Neither the Ode nor the Monumentum fits the Volume’s designation, as they are both instrumental.  I listened to a lot of Stravinsky beginning in my undergrad years, but Perséphone was the last substantial work upon which I turned attention.  I love it.

Stravinsky was so frequently, so reliably creative and inventive, it seems unfair to thrash him for those rare occasions he ‘phoned it in,’ but anything he says in the Ode, he said more substantively elsewhere.  Eric Walter White observes: Dedicated to the memory of Natalie Koussevitzky [...] When Natalie died, her husband set up a Foundation to commission new works in her memory. In 1943 Stravinsky received one of these commissions and decided to erite a tripytych for orchestra. At that time, the Eclogue (the second piece in the triptych) was already in existence, as it had been composed for an abortive film project (Orson Welles’s Jane Eyre)

The performance here by the Clevelanders is certainly excellent.

For me, the Monumentum is one of the peaks of his neoclassical output.

 8)
Don’t forget your four A’s, folks: Alex, Arnie, Alban and Anton


Offline Traverso

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Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #37787 on: April 14, 2021, 10:58:44 AM »
Stravinsky

CD 19


Well,it seems a good idea to listen to Momentum pro Gesualdo di Venosa



Offline André

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Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #37788 on: April 14, 2021, 11:03:04 AM »


Cello concerto no 2 and symphony in E (1944). Mossolov is not extensively recorded, except for the short Iron Foundry and a few piano works. A student of Myaskovsky and Glière, Mossolov’s style changed radically in the early 1930s, perhaps for fear of political persecution - to no avail: he was excluded from the powerful Composers Union in 1936. He spent some time in the central asian republics of the USSR, studying and collecting folk songs.

In these wartime works what is most striking is the strong lyrical vein that courses through from the initial thematic strains to the very end. The style of Myaskovsky is definitely in filigree throughout. Also, the use of folk tunes brings him sometimes close to Tchaikovsky (Eugene Onegin) and Prokofiev (the Young Juliet theme from R&J makes a surprising choice for the coda of the symphony, where the rythm is changed to that of a deliberate march). Surprisingly tuneful, big-hearted stuff then, completely different from the futuristic/motoric style of Iron Foundry.

Performances and sound seem adequate but I can’t muster more enthusiasm. The percussion in particular sounds anaemic (timpani, bass drum, celesta, triangle, harp, etc) and the soundstage lacks a precise spatial image. I can’t help thinking Chandos would have given us something much more solid and colourful. Some major label should take up the challenge and give us the other concertos and symphonies.

Offline André

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Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #37789 on: April 14, 2021, 11:07:46 AM »


CD 5 from this box set:



Suitable for listening in the car.

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #37790 on: April 14, 2021, 11:18:59 AM »
NP:

Strauss
Ein Heldenleben, Op. 40
Staatskapelle Dresden
Sinopoli


Don’t forget your four A’s, folks: Alex, Arnie, Alban and Anton


Offline ritter

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Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #37791 on: April 14, 2021, 11:27:14 AM »
Some Richard Strauss here as well: the “Moonlight Music” and the closing scene from Capriccio.



Can it get more authentic than this? The broadcast (in perfectly tolerable sound) is led by Clemens Krauss, who not only conducted of the world première in the same city (Munich, albeit with a different orchestra), and the countess is sung by the same soprano, Viorica Ursuleac, who created the rôle.

ritter
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«Ognuno sta solo sul cuor della terra
trafitto da un raggio di sole:
ed è subito sera.»

Offline André

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Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #37792 on: April 14, 2021, 11:30:19 AM »
Some Richard Strauss here as well: the “Moonlight Music” and the closing scene from Capriccio.



Can it get more authentic than this? The broadcast (in perfectly tolerable sound) is led by Clemens Krauss, who not only conducted of the world première in the same city (Munich, albeit with a different orchestra), and the countess is sung by the same soprano, Viorica Ursuleac, who created the rôle.

Ursuleac was Mrs Kraus à la ville.

Offline ritter

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Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #37793 on: April 14, 2021, 11:37:34 AM »
Ursuleac was Mrs Kraus à la ville.
Indeed she was. Good day, André.

The Strauss fest continues, with Montserrat Caballé singing the final scene from Salomé, under the baton of Leonard Bernstein.



Allein was tut's? Was tut's?
Ich habe deinen Mund geküßt,
Jokanaan
”.

Wunderbar!
« Last Edit: April 14, 2021, 11:47:07 AM by ritter »
ritter
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«Ognuno sta solo sul cuor della terra
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ed è subito sera.»

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #37794 on: April 14, 2021, 11:50:27 AM »
Indeed she was. Good day, André.

The Strauss fest continues, with Montserrat Caballé singing the final scene from Salomé, under the baton of Leonard Bernstein.



Allein was tut's? Was tut's?
Ich habe deinen Mund geküßt,
Jokanaan
”.

Wunderbar!

It seems that Bernstein didn’t conduct a lot of Strauss. I know he’s recorded some of the symphonic poems while on Columbia. Does he strike you as a good Straussian, Rafael?
Don’t forget your four A’s, folks: Alex, Arnie, Alban and Anton


Offline ritter

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Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #37795 on: April 14, 2021, 11:56:17 AM »
It seems that Bernstein didn’t conduct a lot of Strauss. I know he’s recorded some of the symphonic poems while on Columbia. Does he strike you as a good Straussian, Rafael?
I don’t know much if it, only these selections from Salome, and the Rosenkavalier from Vienna. I think the latter is a splendid recording, and has something special to it I cannot really describe...

EDIT:

...or perhaps I can? It’s as if Bernstein, a foreigner in Vienna (and a highly beloved on at that) was trying to more echt-Wienerisch than any Viennese could ever be. The result is really charming...
« Last Edit: April 14, 2021, 12:06:07 PM by ritter »
ritter
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«Ognuno sta solo sul cuor della terra
trafitto da un raggio di sole:
ed è subito sera.»

Offline MusicTurner

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Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #37796 on: April 14, 2021, 12:01:53 PM »


CD 5 from this box set:



Suitable for listening in the car.

Interesting that those 10x ultra budget CDs are all quite new recordings.

Offline listener

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Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #37797 on: April 14, 2021, 12:07:47 PM »
BRAHMS:  Piano Trio in Bb  op.8  IVES   Piano Trio
both played a bit too carefully for my taste by the Trio Fontenay
REGER: Fantasy on Wie schön leucht' uns der Morgenstern, BACH Organ Sonata 5 in C
KARG-ELERT:  5 Pieces
Graham Barber,  Klais organ of Altenberg Cathedral
"Keep your hand on the throttle and your eye on the rail as you walk through life's pathway."

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #37798 on: April 14, 2021, 12:09:29 PM »
I don’t know much if it, only these selections from Salome, and the Rosenkavalier from Vienna. I think the latter is a splendid recording, and has something special to it I cannot really describe...

EDIT:

...or perhaps I can? It’s as if Bernstein, a foreigner in Vienna (and a highly beloved on at that) was trying to more echt-Wienerisch than any Viennese could ever be. The result is really charming...

It looks like I’ll have to look into Bernstein’s Der Rosenkavalier, although wouldn’t you say Bernstein is just as brash as Solti? What makes you dislike the Solti, but like the Bernstein?
Don’t forget your four A’s, folks: Alex, Arnie, Alban and Anton


Offline "Harry"

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Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #37799 on: April 14, 2021, 12:26:32 PM »


Cello concerto no 2 and symphony in E (1944). Mossolov is not extensively recorded, except for the short Iron Foundry and a few piano works. A student of Myaskovsky and Glière, Mossolov’s style changed radically in the early 1930s, perhaps for fear of political persecution - to no avail: he was excluded from the powerful Composers Union in 1936. He spent some time in the central asian republics of the USSR, studying and collecting folk songs.

In these wartime works what is most striking is the strong lyrical vein that courses through from the initial thematic strains to the very end. The style of Myaskovsky is definitely in filigree throughout. Also, the use of folk tunes brings him sometimes close to Tchaikovsky (Eugene Onegin) and Prokofiev (the Young Juliet theme from R&J makes a surprising choice for the coda of the symphony, where the rythm is changed to that of a deliberate march). Surprisingly tuneful, big-hearted stuff then, completely different from the futuristic/motoric style of Iron Foundry.

Performances and sound seem adequate but I can’t muster more enthusiasm. The percussion in particular sounds anaemic (timpani, bass drum, celesta, triangle, harp, etc) and the soundstage lacks a precise spatial image. I can’t help thinking Chandos would have given us something much more solid and colourful. Some major label should take up the challenge and give us the other concertos and symphonies.


To my ears there is nothing really wrong with this recording. I do not recognize these things in the recording. But I agree it would be a fine thing if Chandos would record his works.
« Last Edit: April 14, 2021, 12:31:24 PM by "Harry" »
There comes a point in your life when you realize: Who matters, Who never did, Who won't anymore, And who always will. So, don't worry about people from your past, there's a reason why they didn't make it to your future.