Author Topic: What are you listening 2 now?  (Read 1090988 times)

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Offline deprofundis

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Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #39860 on: May 07, 2021, 08:34:58 AM »
it is very lush and as you say the soloists are totally charismatic. But seeing you mention it prompted me to swing in the opposite direction and listen to this CD of c13 French music. No instruments, just three tenors


Nice Mandryka sir you made an Eagle whit this release, was not aware of existence, I am impressed kind sir
My works 26 yrs anniversary noisy hell production on Bandcamp featuring works 4 works whiteout: Hexen! smoke & fire, not on own N.H.P Record ,tell what ya think, need feedback from Students radio-show?:
https://bandcamp.com/baronvonblood lauch private, of Two LP's of WRECKAGE and TOTAL ANNIHILATION

Offline deprofundis

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Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #39861 on: May 07, 2021, 08:45:01 AM »
Purchased two CD today, wait , tapis rouge= red carpet, triumphant drum rolls and I present  my purchase and listening:

First we got



EL CANT DE LA SIBI-LA AND OTHER SACRED MEDIEVAL WORKS, on Dynamic Record, Musicaround Ensemble, Vera Marenco Conductor and Vielle Eugenia.

That not all  got some great Baroque master of masters, I was thinking , since buying J.s Bach, Motets for 6 time , Naxos, Billiant  and ect yada yada yada, I seen this BIS super audio CD decided to buy it even if a tiny bit more expensive (I'm such a Scrooge) lol but this one, listening tonight whit my father he love J.S Bach more than me.  8)



Have a great wonderful sunny cloudless day everyone out there on GmG.
« Last Edit: May 07, 2021, 01:07:32 PM by Que »
My works 26 yrs anniversary noisy hell production on Bandcamp featuring works 4 works whiteout: Hexen! smoke & fire, not on own N.H.P Record ,tell what ya think, need feedback from Students radio-show?:
https://bandcamp.com/baronvonblood lauch private, of Two LP's of WRECKAGE and TOTAL ANNIHILATION

Offline SonicMan46

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Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #39862 on: May 07, 2021, 09:10:58 AM »
New arrival from JPC - 13 Euros HERE:

Jean-Claude Veilhan - his Complete Mozart Recordings in a 5-disc box - recordings summarized below - I already have 1 1/2 discs of this music which I love - historic instruments including use of plenty of basset horns (one shown on the cover art below along w/ the Trio di Basseto shown; plus the String Trio Stadler - named after Anton Stadler, Wolfie's clarinetist for whom he composed the wonderful Quintet & Concerto).  Dave :)

Quote
CD1: Clarinet Quartets, Op. 79 (K.380/374f; K378/317d; K.496)
CD2: Divertimentos Nos. 1-5 (K.439b)
CD3: Clarinet Quintet (K.581) & Clarinet Concerto (K.622)
CD4: Magic Flute (K.620) arr. for three Basset Horns & Timpani
CD5: Miscellaneous, including Divertimenti, Marriage Figaro

 
« Last Edit: May 07, 2021, 09:13:53 AM by SonicMan46 »

Offline kyjo

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Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #39863 on: May 07, 2021, 09:40:11 AM »
A first listen:

Weinberg
Symphony № 3 in b minor, Op. 45 (1949)


<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/rYBMLgbK_l0" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/rYBMLgbK_l0</a>

A beautiful work, one of my favorites by Weinberg.
"Music is enough for a lifetime, but a lifetime is not enough for music" - Sergei Rachmaninoff

Offline 71 dB

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Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #39864 on: May 07, 2021, 10:57:38 AM »
Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach -Sonatas for keyboard and violin Wq71-74, 76 - Roberto Loreggian/Federico Guglielmo
Spatial distortion is a serious problem deteriorating headphone listening.
Crossfeeders reduce spatial distortion and make the sound more natural
and less tiresome in headphone listening.

My Sound Cloud page <-- NEW track "Yin Yang"

Online aligreto

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Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #39865 on: May 07, 2021, 11:08:12 AM »
Miaskovsky: Links [Svetlanov] Op. 65





This work is mentioned in Wiki as “Suite for orchestra, Op. 65 (1945) Orchestrations of early piano pieces”. I found the musical content mildly interesting and obviously, of course, the orchestration. It cannot, of course, compare or compete with the symphonic works in terms of construction of an argument or overall cohesion but it is still an interesting listen for the detail in the scoring, orchestration and musical language.
It is better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak and leave no doubt.

Online aligreto

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Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #39866 on: May 07, 2021, 11:10:36 AM »
First-Listen Friday meets Myaskovsky Madness!

Myaskovsky
Sinfonietta in b minor, Op. 32 № 2
Divertissement, Op. 80
Svetlanov & al.


After the tremendous impact of this album's opener, the tone-poem Silence, I found the Sinfonietta something of a disappointingly dutiful listen. It dates from the same year (1929) in which Prokofiev made the final revision to his own Sinfonietta (first composed in 1909 (the year before Myaskovsky completed Silence)

The three movements of Myaskovsky's Sinfonietta are:
1. Allegro, piccante e serioso
2. Andante
3. Presto

The five movements of the Prokofiev are:

1. Allegro giocoso
2. Andante
3. Intermezzo: Vivace
4. Scherzo: Allegro risoluto
5. Allegro giocoso

The difference in character can be summed up in the contrasting descriptors for the respective first movements: serioso and giocoso.

Without wishing to flog the Myaskovsky piece for not being Prokofiev's ... the central fact for me is that the tone of Myaskovsky's work is peculiarly lugubrious for a piece designated a Sinfonietta.  In my first hearing, I was not conscious of the third movement Presto casting off the gloom much.  I shall go back to the piece, in hopes that the fog may clear (we might say)

Interesting observations, Karl.
It is better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak and leave no doubt.

Online aligreto

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Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #39867 on: May 07, 2021, 11:19:46 AM »

Unfortunately I can't listen to anything tonight as the CD player has packed up :'(
But, I have a new one which I'll try to set up later.  ;D

Best of luck with setting up, Jeffrey.
It is better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak and leave no doubt.

Online ritter

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Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #39868 on: May 07, 2021, 11:30:15 AM »
First listen to Juan José Castro’s cantata Martín Fierro:


The work uses extracts of José Hernández’s poem Martín Fierro (“the national book of Argentinians”) as its text, and is scored for baritone (who recounts—in first person—episodes from Fierro’s life), chorus and orchestra. The first section is very nostalgic, and then later some typical Argentinian rhythms are used (but much tamer than first period GinasteraCastro had studied in Paris with d’Indy, after all, and was close to Manuel de Falla). The orchestral writing, and to a certain extent, the choral parts are the most interesting. All in all, quite enjoyable and appealing. Not that I have anything to compare it to, but the performance by baritone Luciano Garay, the choruses and the Symphony Orchestra of the Province if Santa Fé, under Carlos Cuesta makes a strong case for the piece.

« Last Edit: May 07, 2021, 11:41:31 AM by ritter »
ritter
-------------------------------------------------------------
«Ognuno sta solo sul cuor della terra
trafitto da un raggio di sole:
ed è subito sera.»

Online ritter

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Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #39869 on: May 07, 2021, 11:57:25 AM »
Another first listen:


Actually, I don’t recall having ever listened to any Widor (as I’m not into organ music). These trios start promisingly, with a very late-romantic, albeit refined and elegant, sound.
« Last Edit: May 07, 2021, 12:34:41 PM by ritter »
ritter
-------------------------------------------------------------
«Ognuno sta solo sul cuor della terra
trafitto da un raggio di sole:
ed è subito sera.»

Online aligreto

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Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #39870 on: May 07, 2021, 12:31:52 PM »
Varese: Density 21.5 [Boulez] played by Lawrence Beauregard





This is a short work for solo flute and it is very accessible.
It is better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak and leave no doubt.

Offline SimonNZ

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Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #39871 on: May 07, 2021, 12:57:18 PM »

Online vandermolen

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Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #39872 on: May 07, 2021, 01:01:30 PM »
NP:

Respighi
Vetrate Di Chiesa (Church Windows), P. 150
Philharmonia
Simon




Still the Church Windows performance to beat.
+1
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Online vandermolen

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Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #39873 on: May 07, 2021, 01:02:26 PM »
A beautiful work, one of my favorites by Weinberg.
Mine too Kyle.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Online vandermolen

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Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #39874 on: May 07, 2021, 01:03:53 PM »
Best of luck with setting up, Jeffrey.
Thanks Fergus! Too tired after work today but hopefully tomorrow.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline The new erato

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Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #39875 on: May 07, 2021, 01:06:40 PM »
I am NO expert on this period but enjoyed this piece of fiction;



the proverbial rollicking-good-read based on this Crusade....
I've read it. Interesting fiction.

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #39876 on: May 07, 2021, 04:40:09 PM »
First-Listen Friday meets Myaskovsky Madness!

Myaskovsky
Sinfonietta in b minor, Op. 32 № 2
Divertissement, Op. 80
Svetlanov & al.


After the tremendous impact of this album's opener, the tone-poem Silence, I found the Sinfonietta something of a disappointingly dutiful listen. It dates from the same year (1929) in which Prokofiev made the final revision to his own Sinfonietta (first composed in 1909 (the year before Myaskovsky completed Silence)

The three movements of Myaskovsky's Sinfonietta are:
1. Allegro, piccante e serioso
2. Andante
3. Presto

The five movements of the Prokofiev are:

1. Allegro giocoso
2. Andante
3. Intermezzo: Vivace
4. Scherzo: Allegro risoluto
5. Allegro giocoso

The difference in character can be summed up in the contrasting descriptors for the respective first movements: serioso and giocoso.

Without wishing to flog the Myaskovsky piece for not being Prokofiev's ... the central fact for me is that the tone of Myaskovsky's work is peculiarly lugubrious for a piece designated a Sinfonietta.  In my first hearing, I was not conscious of the third movement Presto casting off the gloom much.  I shall go back to the piece, in hopes that the fog may clear (we might say)

I've been conscious of the fact that I said nothing about the Op. 80 Divertissement, to which I have just listened afresh. If (while still holding the door open to my becoming reconciled with a “Sinfonietta seriosa”) my initial takeaway from the Sinfonietta was the question whether it “succeeded in its genre.” I owe Myaskovsky plaudits for the Divertissement which albeit deep-hued, perhaps, I find entirely successful and enjoyable.
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #39877 on: May 07, 2021, 04:41:15 PM »
+ 1
Unfortunately I can't listen to anything tonight as the CD player has packed up :'(
But, I have a new one which I'll try to set up later.  ;D


I feel for you, friend.
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #39878 on: May 07, 2021, 04:45:19 PM »
Miaskovsky: Links [Svetlanov] Op. 65





This work is mentioned in Wiki as “Suite for orchestra, Op. 65 (1945) Orchestrations of early piano pieces”. I found the musical content mildly interesting and obviously, of course, the orchestration. It cannot, of course, compare or compete with the symphonic works in terms of construction of an argument or overall cohesion but it is still an interesting listen for the detail in the scoring, orchestration and musical language.


I feel much the same about Stravinsky's Suites for Small Orchestra, Fergus. One doesn't fault the composer for the "exercise," but the result may not quite earn its place at the table.
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Offline André

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Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #39879 on: May 07, 2021, 04:46:39 PM »


Trios for flute, cello and piano by Martinu, Rorem and Crumb.

The Martinu trio (1945) is staunchly neoclassical, a busy, chatty discourse where the flute constantly plays in its high register, making the work rather grating in the end. The Rorem trio from 1960 is in a classical 4 movement cast. It starts with the flute playing in its low register, a totally different sound from the hyperactive cricket whistle of the Martinu. It’s a rather good work, if conventionally written. The Crumb piece dates from 1971 and uses amplification and electronic gimmickry to alter the instruments’ sounds. It is titled Vox balenae (voice of the whale) and imitates underwater sounds including of course the sounds of whales. It’s an interesting work, although the electronics sound primitive by moments and give the work a somewhat ‘Yellow Submarine’ feel - very vintage. On the whole I enjoyed it the most among the three works here. It is worth noting that it was composed one year after Hovhanness’ famous tone poem ‘And God Created Great Whales’. This latter work has acquired classic status and has definitely aged better IMO.