Author Topic: What are you listening 2 now?  (Read 1577282 times)

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Offline Mirror Image

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Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #42000 on: June 12, 2021, 07:13:44 PM »
I did notice that, but fortunately the other instruments didn't disappoint.

It’s too bad Schwarz didn’t record it when he was doing his cycle with the Seattle Symphony.
"When a man is in despair, it means that he still believes in something." - Dmitri Shostakovich

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #42001 on: June 12, 2021, 07:16:03 PM »
NP:

Shostakovich
Piano Sonata No. 1, Op. 12
Lilya Zilberstein




An absolute brilliant performance!

"When a man is in despair, it means that he still believes in something." - Dmitri Shostakovich

Offline vandermolen

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Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #42002 on: June 12, 2021, 07:19:10 PM »
Bax: Piano Quintet in G minor

One of Bax's most inspired, tuneful and eloquent works. A work for a desert island.


Woohoo!
I agree.  ;D
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline vandermolen

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Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #42003 on: June 12, 2021, 07:21:20 PM »
Walton: Viola Concerto



Another wonderful Walton re-acquaintance. Great as his other three concerti are (including the Sinfonia Concertante), I think this one is overall the most balanced and engaging. I mean, how could that central scherzo not make you smile? And who knew James Ehnes was as great a violist as he is a violinist!


Shebalin: Symphony no. 3



This exceeded my expectations! A dramatic, cogent, and colorful symphony which stands midway in between the styles of his teacher Myaskovsky, his student Shostakovich, and Kabalevsky. Btw, it's none other than Gergiev conducting here (in a rare appearance outside the standard rep)!


Glazunov: Symphony no. 8 (Jarvi)



Oddly enough, I can't say this is one of my favorite Glazunov symphonies (those would be nos. 2, 5 and 6). Glazunov seems to be aiming at something a bit darker and more profound in this symphony but IMO never quite attains it. For example, the dramatic opening of the slow movement seems to prepare the way for a grand tragic statement, however the majority of the rest of the movement is much more relaxed in character. I also missed the typical sparkling, tuneful Glazunovian scherzo here - this one is instead a noodling chromatic affair. I know Jeffrey (vandermolen) will disagree strongly with me! ;) (The two "filler works" on this disc are largely forgettable IMO.)


This entire disc:



I can't believe I had overlooked this magical, colorful album before. These five works feature unusual instrumental combinations (often featuring harp and various woodwinds) which Bax exploits to the highest degree. They overall represent Bax's sunnier side but are not free of darker moments. The Threnody and Scherzo features a particularly prominent bassoon part which, at one point, quotes the opening of his Third Symphony! The performances by the ASMF Chamber Ensemble are fully attuned to Bax's idiom. Any admirer of the composer can't miss this disc!


Boccherini: various symphonies from these discs



Boccherini deserves to be recognized as one of the great Classical Era composers. These inventive, colorful symphonies are especially remarkable for their extended instrumental solos, especially for string instruments (witness the extended cello duets (!) in the first movement of op. 12/2). I particularly enjoyed the Symphony in C major, op. 37/1 on the Chandos album.
Don't know the Boccherini but +1 for all the others Kyle.  :)
PS I don't 'strongly disagree' with you re: Glazunov Kyle, although I like all the Glazunov symphonies - recently I've come to appreciate No.3 more, so that my favourites are now 1-3, 7 and 8. and the fragment of No.9 which I wish AG had completed.
« Last Edit: June 12, 2021, 07:25:12 PM by vandermolen »
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline vandermolen

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Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #42004 on: June 12, 2021, 07:30:54 PM »
Borodin: Symphony no. 1 in E-flat major



Like I said in the "fine first symphonies" poll, I don't understand why no one, not even on this forum, ever talks about this rhythmic, tuneful symphony - it's just marvelous! It's equally as good as the more famous Second. And it gets one hell of a fiery performance here! Tjeknavorian drives the music along while still giving it weight and impact. Terrific stuff!


Kabalevsky: Symphony no. 2 in C minor



Between two high-spirited, exuberant movements lies a substantial slow movement of considerable depth which rises to two powerful climaxes. I just love Kabalevsky's music!


Weber: Clarinet Quintet in B-flat major



Weber really knew how to write delightful, virtuosic, and soulful music for the clarinet, and he doesn't relegate the strings to an accompanying role either. Feel-good music!


Walton: Piano Quartet



My goodness, I had forgotten how astounding this early work is! One can hear an impressionistic Ravelian influence in some passages (especially in the gorgeous slow movement), but overall this is a stunningly mature work. Walton really comes into his own in the exciting, syncopated finale. I simply can't imagine this performance being bettered, either. It's undoubtedly one of my favorite Walton works as well as one of the great piano quartets.


Smetana: Má vlast



It had been a while since I had listened to this iconic work, and I can't say my affection for it increased drastically. The Moldau is definitely my favorite movement; most of the others strike me as too bombastic (I think it's all the cymbal crashing and triangle dinging that does it for me). To me, Smetana's chamber works represent a more personal and emotional side of his musical personality.
+1 for Kabalevsky and I love that set, although symphonies 1 and 4 are my favourites. I think that No. 4 is a much more interesting and greater work than most people seem to think.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #42005 on: June 12, 2021, 07:49:43 PM »
+1 for Kabalevsky and I love that set, although symphonies 1 and 4 are my favourites. I think that No. 4 is a much more interesting and greater work than most people seem to think.

I should revisit those Kabalevsky symphonies. I’ll listen to the 4th first on your recommendation, Jeffrey.
"When a man is in despair, it means that he still believes in something." - Dmitri Shostakovich

Offline Madiel

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Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #42006 on: June 13, 2021, 12:31:20 AM »
It was a toss-up between David Bowie and Beethoven.

Piano Concerto No.3 won for the current slot.

I am now working on a discography of the works of Vagn Holmboe. Please visit and also contribute!

Offline aligreto

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Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #42007 on: June 13, 2021, 01:11:12 AM »
Now Playing:




Mozart: Symphony #41 in C, K 551, "Jupiter"


Rene Jacobs leading this performance - very nice... :)

I don't know it but I will bet that it is indeed very nice.
It is better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak and leave no doubt.

Offline aligreto

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Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #42008 on: June 13, 2021, 01:12:12 AM »
It is better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak and leave no doubt.

Offline aligreto

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Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #42009 on: June 13, 2021, 01:13:19 AM »
Yes, indeed, although I have more attachment to the 2nd.

A more mature work.
It is better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak and leave no doubt.

Offline aligreto

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Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #42010 on: June 13, 2021, 01:16:03 AM »
Fux: Requiem [Clemcic]





I have very limited exposure to the music of Fux but I did enjoy this fine work by any standard. The vocal lines flow easily and the orchestral accompaniments are sympathetic and interesting. I particularly like the soprano lines and the solo soprano voice which delivers them. I also like the instrumental movements scattered throughout the work.
It is better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak and leave no doubt.

Offline Que

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Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #42011 on: June 13, 2021, 01:45:30 AM »
Fux: Requiem [Clemcic]




I have very limited exposure to the music of Fux but I did enjoy this fine work by any standard. The vocal lines flow easily and the orchestral accompaniments are sympathetic and interesting. I particularly like the soprano lines and the solo soprano voice which delivers them. I also like the instrumental movements scattered throughout the work.

I like the music - even though Fux is a quite a conservative composer - but I couldn't deal with Clemencic's slow tempi and low energy level.

This recording I found to be more to my liking:


Offline Biffo

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Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #42012 on: June 13, 2021, 02:00:40 AM »
Beethoven: Symphony No 6 in F major Pastoral - Concertgebouw Orchestra  conducted by Eugen Jochum

Offline Traverso

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Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #42013 on: June 13, 2021, 02:35:03 AM »
Werner Egk

Little Abraxas Suite
French Suite after Rameau for large orchestra

Gottfried von Einem
Cappricio for Orchestra

Hans Werner Henze
Ballet Variations

Wolgang Fortner
Symphony (1947)  Finale

Rolf Liebermann
Suite on Swiss folk songs




Offline vandermolen

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Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #42014 on: June 13, 2021, 03:08:11 AM »
I should revisit those Kabalevsky symphonies. I’ll listen to the 4th first on your recommendation, Jeffrey.
There are two recordings AFAIK John, the CPO set which is fine but a more urgent, but less well recorded, version from Kabalevsky himself. I enjoy both versions.
TD
Sibelius: 'Tapiola'
LSO/Tauno Hannikainen
IMO, one of the greatest performances of this enigmatic score and this (Everest) release is the best recording of it. The comparatively slow pace of the opening is very moving and I can understand why Bax had tears streaming down his face whilst listening to this work:


« Last Edit: June 13, 2021, 03:37:04 AM by vandermolen »
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Traverso

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Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #42015 on: June 13, 2021, 03:44:06 AM »
Bartók

Four Orchestral Pieces
Concerto for Orchestra

Chicago symphony Orchestra


Offline Dry Brett Kavanaugh

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Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #42016 on: June 13, 2021, 04:11:39 AM »


Richard Wagner: Preludes from Der fliegende Holländer, Tannhäuser, Lohengrin, etc. Daniel Barenboim, Chicago Symphony Orchestra


Nice disc. Among many recordings of the overtures and preludes, Markevitch’s album is my personal favorite. The recording is old (1954/1959) and monaural. But it has an aura, and the performance is majestic. Plus, the recording sound is not bad. Also, I find Paray’s recording enjoyable though I could be biased.

Offline foxandpeng

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Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #42017 on: June 13, 2021, 04:36:38 AM »
RVW Symphony #3

I believe that currently this cycle and these symphonies by RVW would be my indispensable choice for a Desert Island Discs. Few composers are able to stop me in my tracks so consistently and so powerfully. I know lists change, but I can't imagine many rivals in all my collection.

Offline Madiel

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Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #42018 on: June 13, 2021, 04:55:08 AM »
Trying a new Deutsche Grammophon release: Dustin O’Halloran, “Silfur”.

Utterly tedious. What is DG of all labels doing peddling this?
I am now working on a discography of the works of Vagn Holmboe. Please visit and also contribute!

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #42019 on: June 13, 2021, 05:01:56 AM »
There are two recordings AFAIK John, the CPO set which is fine but a more urgent, but less well recorded, version from Kabalevsky himself. I enjoy both versions.

I own the CPO set, which I liked overall, but thought could use a bit more edge in the playing. I do believe I have that Kabalevsky conducted performance somewhere, but I’m not exactly sure where.
"When a man is in despair, it means that he still believes in something." - Dmitri Shostakovich