Author Topic: What are you listening 2 now?  (Read 1726800 times)

Bachtoven, classicalgeek, Daverz and 4 Guests are viewing this topic.

Offline Mirror Image

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 58267
  • Dmitri Shostakovich (1906 - 1975)
  • Location: Northeast GA, US
  • Currently Listening to:
    Mostly Austro-Germanic and Soviet/Russian repertoire
Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #44720 on: July 13, 2021, 05:44:12 AM »
NP:

Dvořák
String Quartet No. 13 in G Major, Op. 106, B. 192
Pavel Haas Quartet


"When a man is in despair, it means that he still believes in something." - Dmitri Shostakovich

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 61714
  • Et quid amabo nisi quod ænigma est?
    • Henningmusick
  • Location: Boston, Mass.
  • Currently Listening to:
    Shostakovich, D. Scarlattii, Stravinsky, JS Bach, Liszt, Martinů, Haydn, Henning
Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #44721 on: July 13, 2021, 05:56:12 AM »


George Frederick McKay: Evocation Symphony, or "Symphony for Seattle". John McLaughlin Williams, National Symphony Orchestra of Ukraine

First listen. Sounds like good stuff.

Very nice.
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 61714
  • Et quid amabo nisi quod ænigma est?
    • Henningmusick
  • Location: Boston, Mass.
  • Currently Listening to:
    Shostakovich, D. Scarlattii, Stravinsky, JS Bach, Liszt, Martinů, Haydn, Henning
Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #44722 on: July 13, 2021, 06:09:07 AM »
We call that a connoisseur  :D

(* chortle *)
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Offline Mandryka

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 17587
Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #44723 on: July 13, 2021, 06:12:49 AM »



A great pleasure to return to the first release in Gilbert Rowland’s Froberger series - entirely dedicated to harpsichord music, it seems to be a French type instrument and I can hear no signs of any ravalement. It sounds great, colourful and sweet, with a more than adequate bass response. The performances are totally tasteful and modest, everything sounds natural and comme il faut, everything he does seems to flow organically from Froberger’s ideas. All very satisfying.
« Last Edit: July 13, 2021, 06:19:24 AM by Mandryka »
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Offline Mirror Image

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 58267
  • Dmitri Shostakovich (1906 - 1975)
  • Location: Northeast GA, US
  • Currently Listening to:
    Mostly Austro-Germanic and Soviet/Russian repertoire
Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #44724 on: July 13, 2021, 06:15:36 AM »
NP:

Enescu
Symphonie de chambre, Op. 33
Orchestre de Chambre de Lausanne
Foster


"When a man is in despair, it means that he still believes in something." - Dmitri Shostakovich

Offline Symphonic Addict

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 4003
Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #44725 on: July 13, 2021, 06:19:25 AM »
Earlier today, Tubin Symphony No.10, twice.



I decided I'd compare at least some of the Jarvi and Volmer versions directly. Volmer felt smoother and more polished... which I'm not sure was a good thing in this music. I think I preferred having a little bit of an edge.

No. 10 is one of his finest and a personal favorite. I also prefer Järvi over Volmer. I consider that this music needs more power and drive to be more effective. No wonder Volmer is pretty satisfying in the 4th Sinfonia Lirica, though.
Give us something else; give us something new; for Heaven's sake give us something bad, so long as we feel we are alive and active and not just passive admirers of tradition!

Carl Nielsen

Offline Mirror Image

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 58267
  • Dmitri Shostakovich (1906 - 1975)
  • Location: Northeast GA, US
  • Currently Listening to:
    Mostly Austro-Germanic and Soviet/Russian repertoire
Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #44726 on: July 13, 2021, 06:23:51 AM »
No. 10 is one of his finest and a personal favorite. I also prefer Järvi over Volmer. I consider that this music needs more power and drive to be more effective. No wonder Volmer is pretty satisfying in the 4th Sinfonia Lirica, though.

I agree, although even in the 4th I prefer Järvi. The bold exception here is the ballet Kratt where Volmer recorded the complete work whereas Järvi only recorded the suite, but imagine if Järvi had recorded the complete ballet? The Volmer would be non-competitive. I don’t mean to come down so hard on Volmer, he did, after all, have the foresight and courage to do a Tubin cycle when no one else would follow-up Järvi. A tough act to follow for sure.
"When a man is in despair, it means that he still believes in something." - Dmitri Shostakovich

Offline Mirror Image

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 58267
  • Dmitri Shostakovich (1906 - 1975)
  • Location: Northeast GA, US
  • Currently Listening to:
    Mostly Austro-Germanic and Soviet/Russian repertoire
Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #44727 on: July 13, 2021, 06:35:30 AM »
NP:

Glazunov
Symphony No. 2 in F♯ minor, Op. 16
USSR State SO
Svetlanov




A little review I wrote on this set -

it seems that Glazunov is sometimes unfairly treated like some kind of red-headed stepchild of the Russian Romantic Era. For me, I find him to be of equal to or even preferable in many ways to his teacher, Rimsky-Korsakov. He’s clearly in the Late-Romantic tradition, but what I think makes Glazunov an attractive composer is his attention to the form and how he develops his ideas. There’s a description of his style on Wikipedia where it was written that he had “Rimsky-Korsakov's orchestral virtuosity, Tchaikovsky's lyricism and Taneyev's contrapuntal skill.” I this description is certainly true, but a deeper look into the composer reveals a unique voice separate to those composers. Glazunov was a composer that took me awhile to understand, because I didn’t quite know where he was coming from stylistically. I believe the work that hooked me into his music was his 7th symphony (subtitled “Pastorale”). The slow movement, “Andante”, is where I suddenly realized what he was all about from an emotional standpoint. I heard a yearning quality in this particular movement that actually finds it’s way into many of his works. It’s almost as if he let his guard down long enough to see who behind all of this orchestral technique --- there was a beating heart behind the music after all. This is all it took and now he’s a favorite of mine and I have since enjoyed so many of his works from orchestral suites to concerti to ballets to chamber music, etc.

This set of symphonies recorded by Evgeny Svetlanov and the USSR State Symphony Orchestra, or is it the Russian Federation Academic Symphony Orchestra or is it the....anyway, you get the idea --- this orchestra changes its name each time a board member sneezes, is, for this listener, the finest set available. Svetlanov brings a deeper sense of wonderment and passion to Glazunov that is severely lacking in say Serebrier or Järvi. Not that these two conductors are ‘bad’, they are far from it, but I don’t think they got inside the music like Svetlanov seems to have done. The way he develops and embellishes the musical lines --- one after another are, without a doubt, in a class of their own. The USSR State SO perform admirably well as Svetlanov seemed to have always had “play as if your lives depended on it” mantra happening each time stepped up to the podium. The fidelity of these recordings are quite good and I’d imagine only the most nit-picky audiophile would have something negative to say about it.

If you’re looking for a set of Glazunov symphonies, then look no further than this Svetlanov set. As a supplementary set, I’d recommend Rozhdestvensky, but it seems his cycle is difficult to obtain these days. But, as always, let your ears be the judge and try out Serebrier and Järvi. I might actually revisit both of their sets and give them a fresh listen. Minds can change if one is open enough. Anyway, check out this set! Highly recommended!
« Last Edit: July 13, 2021, 07:24:49 AM by Mirror Image »
"When a man is in despair, it means that he still believes in something." - Dmitri Shostakovich

Offline "Harry"

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 9871
  • Don't waste your energy trying to convince people.
  • Location: Roden, Netherlands
Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #44728 on: July 13, 2021, 06:38:54 AM »
Marin Marais.

Pieces a une et Deux Violes Premier Livre. (1686)
CD IV

Suite in re mineur, re majeur, en fa diese mineur.

Francois Joubert Caillet, Bass Viol.
L'Acheron.
There comes a point in your life when you realize: Who matters, Who never did, Who won't anymore, And who always will. So, don't worry about people from your past, there's a reason why they didn't make it to your future.

Offline SonicMan46

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 14590
  • Location: North Carolina
Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #44729 on: July 13, 2021, 07:06:07 AM »
Stanford, Charles Villiers (1852-1924) - String Quartets w/ the Dante Quartet - there has been a LOT of activity on the composer's thread lately - my collection has increased over the decade and now own the recordings charted below, all instrumental works (not a huge collector of choral/vocal works post-Baroque, just me and despite Stanford's high standing in his writing for voice, whether sacred or seccular).

Stanford wrote 8 String Quartets - I'm listening from a Spotify playlist which also includes the Dante Quartet doing his String Quintets, thus recordings from 4 CDs - my British Music cabinet is FULL, so don't plan to purchase these CDs separately - if boxed into a small container, then a consideration, but Spotify on my den speakers sounds fine; these have received a lot of 'review attention' - attached are both Fanfare and MusicWeb comments on all of the works for those interested.  Dave :)  P.S. click images to enlarge.




Offline VonStupp

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 753
    • Amazon Public Profile
  • Location: Breadbasket, USA
  • Currently Listening to:
    Backtracking through my catalog
Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #44730 on: July 13, 2021, 08:06:17 AM »
Sergei Prokofiev
Cinderella, op. 87

Alexander Glazunov
The Seasons, op. 67

The Cleveland Orchestra & RPO,
Vladimir Ashkenazy
(rec. 1983 & 1990)

I love Cinderella, probably more than Prokofiev's famous Romeo and Juliet. 'The Clock' motive, in particular, is so effectively portentous.

Add to that Glazunov's The Seasons, and this recording hits right where it counts, for me.

« Last Edit: July 13, 2021, 08:08:18 AM by VonStupp »
“All the good music has already been written by people with wigs and stuff.”

Offline Traverso

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 4663
  • Location: The Netherlands
Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #44731 on: July 13, 2021, 08:13:24 AM »
   




Offline Traverso

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 4663
  • Location: The Netherlands
Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #44732 on: July 13, 2021, 08:55:53 AM »
Sergei Prokofiev
Cinderella, op. 87

Alexander Glazunov
The Seasons, op. 67

The Cleveland Orchestra & RPO,
Vladimir Ashkenazy
(rec. 1983 & 1990)

I love Cinderella, probably more than Prokofiev's famous Romeo and Juliet. 'The Clock' motive, in particular, is so effectively portentous.

Add to that Glazunov's The Seasons, and this recording hits right where it counts, for me.



 This is definitely a recommendation ,I will look for this recording  :)

Offline Pohjolas Daughter

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 7670
  • Location: USA
Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #44733 on: July 13, 2021, 09:37:24 AM »
Well a real collector would pay $5,000 for some rare vinyl pressing of an album you could get on CD for $5. ::)
Perhaps if one could afford it (money being no option)...  :-\

PD

p.s.  The rest of us just dream....

Offline Mirror Image

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 58267
  • Dmitri Shostakovich (1906 - 1975)
  • Location: Northeast GA, US
  • Currently Listening to:
    Mostly Austro-Germanic and Soviet/Russian repertoire
Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #44734 on: July 13, 2021, 09:45:26 AM »
This is definitely a recommendation ,I will look for this recording  :)

It is excellent, Jan. Like VonStupp, I prefer Cinderella to Romeo & Juliet, but this doesn’t mean that Romeo & Juliet isn’t without its moments of greatness.
"When a man is in despair, it means that he still believes in something." - Dmitri Shostakovich

Offline VonStupp

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 753
    • Amazon Public Profile
  • Location: Breadbasket, USA
  • Currently Listening to:
    Backtracking through my catalog
Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #44735 on: July 13, 2021, 09:55:39 AM »
It is excellent, Jan. Like VonStupp, I prefer Cinderella to Romeo & Juliet, but this doesn’t mean that Romeo & Juliet isn’t without its moments of greatness.

Lord no, I wouldn't want to be without R&J.  With that said, if there is time I will spin this next:

Sergei Prokofiev
Romeo and Juliet, op. 64
(rec. 1973)

The Cleveland Orchestra - Lorin Maazel

“All the good music has already been written by people with wigs and stuff.”

Offline Mandryka

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 17587
Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #44736 on: July 13, 2021, 10:23:03 AM »
Lord no, I wouldn't want to be without R&J


I agree. Have you heard The Tale of the Stone Flower -- another very late one?

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/PM5x3cd7h3g&amp;ab_channel=Rodders" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/PM5x3cd7h3g&amp;ab_channel=Rodders</a>

Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 61714
  • Et quid amabo nisi quod ænigma est?
    • Henningmusick
  • Location: Boston, Mass.
  • Currently Listening to:
    Shostakovich, D. Scarlattii, Stravinsky, JS Bach, Liszt, Martinů, Haydn, Henning
Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #44737 on: July 13, 2021, 10:26:10 AM »
I agree. Have you heard The Tale of the Stone Flower -- another very late one?

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/PM5x3cd7h3g&amp;ab_channel=Rodders" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/PM5x3cd7h3g&amp;ab_channel=Rodders</a>



Big fan of the Op. 118
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Offline Mandryka

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 17587
Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #44738 on: July 13, 2021, 10:27:04 AM »
Big fan of the Op. 118

Yes, I'm playing that youtube now and I'm thinking -- I need to give this more attention soon. Late Prok is very attractive to me.
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 61714
  • Et quid amabo nisi quod ænigma est?
    • Henningmusick
  • Location: Boston, Mass.
  • Currently Listening to:
    Shostakovich, D. Scarlattii, Stravinsky, JS Bach, Liszt, Martinů, Haydn, Henning
Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #44739 on: July 13, 2021, 10:33:46 AM »
Weinberg
Symphony № 2, Op. 30 (1946)
Kremerata Baltica
« Last Edit: July 13, 2021, 11:13:51 AM by k a rl h e nn i ng »
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot