Author Topic: What are you listening 2 now?  (Read 1713003 times)

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Offline aligreto

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Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #49800 on: September 19, 2021, 09:49:22 AM »
Gorecki- Symphony No. 3 [Swoboda]





I have always liked this work. This is a big, powerful presentation of this work. The opening movement is near perfect. Those double basses are wonderful throughout. The playing throughout is superb and emotional. The direction is very taut without impinging on the integrity of the music; it is all very well held together. The dynamics in this movement are also very well controlled. The second movement is wonderfully powerful,  atmospheric and enchanting. The soprano, Kilanowicz, is quite haunting in places and she carries off her part exquisitely. The final movement is very well balanced in terms of the delivery of the emotions and the dynamics. Once again, Kilanowicz excels in her delivery. A supreme performance! The expansive recording is also really wonderful throughout.

I really should, after hearing this, do an A/B comparison session of Kilanowicz/Swoboda vs. Kilanowicz/Wit.
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Offline aligreto

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Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #49801 on: September 19, 2021, 09:50:46 AM »





My favourite of all Requiems of all composers. By a country mile! 🙂

I can readily understand that, Ray.
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Offline aligreto

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Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #49802 on: September 19, 2021, 09:52:27 AM »
Janáček Taras Bulba (Horenstein / Vienna Pro Musica aka Wiener Symphoniker)



Wow.

Horenstein was a great and one of my personal favourite conductors.
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Offline Brewski

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Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #49803 on: September 19, 2021, 09:55:37 AM »
Janáček Taras Bulba (Horenstein / Vienna Pro Musica aka Wiener Symphoniker)



Wow.

What an exciting recording (as a fan of both pieces). How is the sound? I know not to expect miracles, just hoping it's "not bad."

Horenstein was a great and one of my personal favourite conductors.

His Nielsen 5 was my introduction, and an incredible one.

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Offline VonStupp

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Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #49804 on: September 19, 2021, 10:02:09 AM »
Felix Mendelssohn
Die Erste Walpurgisnacht, op. 60

Soloists
Cleveland Orch. & Chorus - Christoph von Dohnányi
(rec. 1988)

Mendelssohn's cantata about Druids pulling a nighttime prank on the overbearing Christians is a hoot. At the very least, the overture should stand as an equal to his other more famous ones.

As usual from this time, Cleveland sounds great under Dohnányi.

“All the good music has already been written by people with wigs and stuff.”

Offline vers la flamme

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Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #49805 on: September 19, 2021, 10:11:21 AM »
Beethoven: Symphony No. 4 [Schmidt-Isserstedt]





Some regard this symphony as looking back towards the Classical tradition. I do not agree with that view. To me it is more a pause for breath and contemplation between what went before and what was yet to come. Yes, there are certainly nods back in that direction but there are too many elements of the musical language of the fourth that have their origin in the third for me to see it any other way. This is another wonderfully powerful work; different, as they all were, but very alluring and attractive.

The Symphony starts with a Haydnesque slow introduction. This prolonged slow, dark, brooding introduction belies what is to come. With a series of chords the orchestra ultimately breaks free and launches into a light and sunny theme. The writing for the woodwinds is particularly wonderful in this movement. There is also great dynamic range in this movement coupled with great energy and drive.

The Adagio contains really lovely music. The first theme on the flutes with that typical Mozartian throbbing accompaniment on the violins is very beautiful as is that second haunting theme played on the clarinet. The violins ultimately take up the melancholy running. Those woodwinds return and we gradually make our way towards a graceful conclusion.

The third movement is designated “Menuetto” but for all intents and purposes it is  Scherzo. This is indeed a “Minuet” that is far removed from the elegant and graceful examples by both Haydn and Mozart. The other unusual aspect here is the somewhat lengthy Trio section.

The final movement expresses the vital force of Beethoven. It is restless and energetic, bursting with vitality and forward drive.

I have a similar view of the 4th as yours. One of my favorite symphonies of Beethoven's. Thanks for the interesting words. I've never heard Hans Schmidt-Isserstedt's Beethoven, but I've heard good things.

Offline André

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Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #49806 on: September 19, 2021, 10:22:30 AM »


Disc 3.

K464 and 465. The disc is completed by the violin sonata K301 (Petr Messiereur and Stanislav Bogunia, recorded in a very different acoustic).

The Talichs are wonderful in the harmonic creases of Mozart’s slow movements (K464 has a glorious Andante). In the more volatile K465 I would have wished for a tad more extroversion.

Offline ritter

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Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #49807 on: September 19, 2021, 10:27:24 AM »
Sylvano Bussotti in memoriam

Arturo Tamayo conducts The Rara Requiem (vocal and instrumental soloists, Orchestra and Chorus of the Teatro La Fenice).


Arguably its composer’s best know work, The Rara Requiem (from 1969) is not a setting of the Latin Requiem mass text, but rather a huge canvas with —purposefully unintelligible— words from antiquity to the time of composition. It’s only one many works by Bussotti with “Rara” in its title (its not quite certain what “Rara” represents), but seems to be a summation of the works that preceded it. Be that as it may, this is a very seductive score, full of musical riches and inventiveness, and one that has an unmistakably “Bussotian” sound world.

There’s a lot of random / performer-dependent aspects to this piece (and most of Bussotti’s work AFAIK), as he eschewed traditional music notation in favour of very “graphic” scores which I understand leave a lot up to the performers’ . This is a page from The Rara Requiem:



This is the second commercial recording the piece received (the first one, on DG under Gianpiero Taverna, was with which I discovered the composer —on LP— some 40 years ago), and is very accomplished, Arturo Tamayo being a champion of Bussotti’s music and a very convincing conductor of 20th century avant-garde repertoire.

« Last Edit: September 19, 2021, 10:40:47 AM by ritter »
ritter
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« Je me suis rarement perdu de vue ; je me suis détesté, je me suis adoré ; puis, nous avons vieilli ensemble. »

Online vandermolen

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Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #49808 on: September 19, 2021, 11:10:48 AM »
Penderecki: Symphony No.3
First listen. Difficult to take in at first hearing but my attention was held throughout. I'm very glad to have heard it and look forward to doing so again although I'm not sure how well it held together as an integrated work. I gather that it was composed over a number of years and, to me, it sounded disjointed in places and without the sense of inevitability of the greatest symphonies - I didn't, for example, find the ending especially convincing. However, overall, it's a most impressive work and my grateful thanks to John (MI) for giving me the opportunity to explore the work of Penderecki. Up until now I only knew the St Luke Passion - presented, as a double LP set, to my brother and myself many decades ago by our Polish au pair girl (we didn't make much sense of it) and the 'Christmas Symphony', which I rather enjoyed on LP:
« Last Edit: September 19, 2021, 11:13:51 AM by vandermolen »
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Que

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Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #49809 on: September 19, 2021, 11:13:02 AM »
I wish you the best of luck but you will see that it is not easy to find  :)

Well, thank you - I'll need it.. :)

Offline André

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Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #49810 on: September 19, 2021, 11:24:59 AM »
Penderecki: Symphony No.3
First listen. Difficult to take in at first hearing but my attention was held throughout. I'm very glad to have heard it and look forward to doing so again although I'm not sure how well it held together as an integrated work. I gather that it was composed over a number of years and, to me, it sounded disjointed in places and without the sense of inevitability of the greatest symphonies - I didn't, for example, find the ending especially convincing. However, overall, it's a most impressive work and my grateful thanks to John (MI) for giving me the opportunity to explore the work of Penderecki. Up until now I only knew the St Luke Passion - presented, as a double LP set, to my brother and myself many decades ago by our Polish au pair girl (we didn't make much sense of it) and the 'Christmas Symphony', which I rather enjoyed on LP:


I really like the symphonies and various concerti by Penderecki. There are more expensive versions on various polish labels, but I find the Naxos series provide excellent value.

Offline André

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Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #49811 on: September 19, 2021, 11:25:58 AM »


From one of Canada’s most constantly inspired composers. The ‘named’ work is for violin and orchestra.

Offline ritter

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Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #49812 on: September 19, 2021, 11:26:24 AM »
More Bussotti before calling it a night…



La Passion selon Sade, extraits de concert. Elise Ross (sop.) and instrumental soloists under the direction of Marcello Panni.

ritter
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Offline VonStupp

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Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #49813 on: September 19, 2021, 12:10:14 PM »


From one of Canada’s most constantly inspired composers. The ‘named’ work is for violin and orchestra.

Interesting, and how is this music?

I heard he passed this past week, but I remember little from him and have no recordings. I know in the 70's and 80's I could expect R. Murray Schafer to appear on student band and orchestra festivals because he wrote approachable music, but also integrated aleatoric and other modern elements not typical of the main repertoire for young people.

The one choral piece I have sung by Schafer, I think it was called Gamelan, was really tough.

VS
« Last Edit: September 19, 2021, 12:29:37 PM by VonStupp »
“All the good music has already been written by people with wigs and stuff.”

Offline VonStupp

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Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #49814 on: September 19, 2021, 12:15:41 PM »
Felix Mendelssohn
Symphony 3 'Scottish', op. 56

The Cleveland Orchestra - Christoph von Dohnányi


Continuing on with much more Mendelssohn.



Felix Mendelssohn
Die Erste Walpurgisnacht, op. 60

Soloists
Cleveland Orch. & Chorus - Christoph von Dohnányi
(rec. 1988)

Mendelssohn's cantata about Druids pulling a nighttime prank on the overbearing Christians is a hoot. At the very least, the overture should stand as an equal to his other more famous ones.

As usual from this time, Cleveland sounds great under Dohnányi.
“All the good music has already been written by people with wigs and stuff.”

Offline SonicMan46

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Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #49815 on: September 19, 2021, 12:20:09 PM »
You’re like that autodidact guy in Sartre’s Nausée who’s working his way through all the books in the National Library of France alphabetically

Well, glad that my 'early music' collection is not large (and not listening to everything) - now it is divided into two sections: 1) Alphabetically by composer; and 2) Compilation discs w/ multiple composers, arranged by performance group - will plan to go through that one too, but probably no more than 50 discs -  :laugh:  Dave

Offline aligreto

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Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #49816 on: September 19, 2021, 12:45:33 PM »
Josquin Desprez: Dufay Ensemble





Déploration
Benedicta Es. Caelorum Regina
Miserere Mei Deus

It is better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak and leave no doubt.

Offline aligreto

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Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #49817 on: September 19, 2021, 12:49:02 PM »

His [Horenstein] Nielsen 5 was my introduction, and an incredible one.


Agreed - a particularly fine presentation of the Nielsen 5.
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Offline aligreto

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Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #49818 on: September 19, 2021, 12:53:07 PM »
Mine too.  Nielsen - Bruckner - Mahler - some great performances.  Always worth seeking out anything by Horenstein.

This Shostakovich 5th is also right up there with the very best, my only reservation being the occasionally congested 1952 mono sound - probably quite a lot of compression was applied.  The interpretation is dead straight - not celebratory, not sarcastic - just a wonderful thing to hear.

The Janáček is jaw-dropping.  One of those wind-it-up-to-11-and-stand-back experiences.

Good to read of more appreciation for Horenstein. Many years ago when I started collecting one of my early philosophies was indeed "Always worth seeking out anything by Horenstein".
It is better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak and leave no doubt.

Offline aligreto

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Re: What are you listening 2 now?
« Reply #49819 on: September 19, 2021, 12:58:08 PM »
I have a similar view of the 4th as yours. One of my favorite symphonies of Beethoven's. Thanks for the interesting words. I've never heard Hans Schmidt-Isserstedt's Beethoven, but I've heard good things.

The Hans Schmidt-Isserstedt Beethoven cycle is well worth investigating. I have to confess that I did not fully appreciate it on first hearing but I have lately grown to appreciate Schmidt-Isserstedt's interpretations and presentations of this music.
It is better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak and leave no doubt.