Author Topic: Contemporary queer composers  (Read 2307 times)

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Offline some guy

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Re: Contemporary queer composers
« Reply #20 on: November 05, 2019, 10:31:33 AM »
No, on the contrary, but let’s not let this turn this into a semantic thread, I’ll answer you straight away in Cato’s Grammar Grumble.
Does the thread use words? Then it's already a "semantic thread." No turning into.

Offline Mandryka

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Re: Contemporary queer composers
« Reply #21 on: November 07, 2019, 05:54:00 AM »
That’s like saying it’s a geometric thread because the letters have a shape.
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Offline dissily Mordentroge

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Re: Contemporary queer composers
« Reply #22 on: November 13, 2019, 02:47:28 PM »
My interest in this started after a discussion about Eastman with a composer. He said that he thought that Eastman’s music was prescient of a significant trend in contemporary music, a quasi romantic trend where the composer’s work is not only informed by the beliefs and values and passions which constitute his identity, but also militates for them.

When I asked for contemporary composers who use their music to militate for queerness, I didn’t get a clear answer. I was pleased to be reminded this morning that Finnissy talks in militant terms though.
Having lurched out of the closet at age 16 and now a crotchety old 73 I’ve never taken offence at being called ‘queer’ given my early aversion to just about everything ‘normal’ from political leanings to music. I’m only offended if someone calls me stupid or dishonest.  “You a queer, gay, fag, fairy?"  etc usually gets a response along the lines of “Why, you looking for a bit” or “Yeh, and what are you going to do about it” or some such. Needless to say an early involvement in the martial arts always came in handy.
As to queer composers/musicians the majority who are out of the closet aren’t classical artists. Same for a range of more or less radical political statements, the classical music world has tended to brush queerness under the carpet or disguise it in peculiar ways such as the casting of Richard Strauss’s ‘Der Rosenkavalier’.

Offline Mandryka

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Re: Contemporary queer composers
« Reply #23 on: April 02, 2020, 01:50:45 PM »
<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/F_MPk_2Uvx8" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/F_MPk_2Uvx8</a>

The first part Finnissy's Other Ground is expressive in an old fashioned sort of way -- think Elgar (without the orchestra in Gerontius)  and maybe Britten (De Vere tormented by the weight of his moral decision . . . )  -- and about someone riddled with angst because he's got AIDS. The monologue is by turns poignant, by turns aggressively, militantly, queer, by turns "mystical" (a la Jonathan Harvey).  I found it quite disturbing because it brought back memories of people long dead now . . . 

Half way through the style becomes more authentically modern -- this is a common trope in Finnissy!
« Last Edit: April 02, 2020, 02:03:58 PM by Mandryka »
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Offline Mandryka

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Re: Contemporary queer composers
« Reply #24 on: April 26, 2020, 11:45:15 PM »
Arguably no longer contemporary, but nevertheless I would say that there’s enough frank and mature and authentic lesbian content in Danses Organiques to make it deserve a place in this thread. Or is it pornographic?




Luc Ferrari was a man, I’m not sure what conclusions to draw from that.

The subtitle of the piece is Cinéma pour les oreilles, and that seems spot on. Indeed listening to some of the raunchier bits in the second half makes me wonder why the genre hasn’t been developed, why creative people haven’t worked more on musique cul.

The final section, #6, is the musical equivalent of the end of Ulysses.
« Last Edit: April 27, 2020, 12:42:46 AM by Mandryka »
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