Author Topic: Guillaume de Machaut (c.1300-1377)  (Read 32867 times)

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Offline Roy Bland

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Re: Guillaume de Machaut (c.1300-1377)
« Reply #220 on: June 16, 2019, 02:28:42 PM »
No, it seems to have been written by Antonino Riccardo Luciani for the TV series
TNX

Online Mandryka

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Re: Guillaume de Machaut (c.1300-1377)
« Reply #221 on: July 21, 2019, 11:42:58 AM »


Listening to this 1973 recording and  what’s striking me most, as often the case in SdFM from this period, is the will to make the music contrapuntally interesting, whether that’s through the juxtaposition of contrasting human voices (and, love it or loathe it, it’s undeniable that Binkley and Ramm makes  a characterful combination when they sing together!), or through the instrumentation. Binkley’s lute music is impressively refined and intelligent. In some of the songs the counterpoint is so interesting it might as well be in the ars subtilior style (eg the two part song  quant à moi /amour et beauté )

They have a distinctive approach to sound, which is small scale and relaxed, totally different from other contemporary groups like Sequentia or Gothic Voices, I like their ideas about how to project sound in this music.


« Last Edit: July 21, 2019, 11:51:25 AM by Mandryka »
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Online Mandryka

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Re: Guillaume de Machaut (c.1300-1377)
« Reply #222 on: October 16, 2019, 12:32:46 PM »


My attention was grabbed, and I mean I was strapped to my seat, when I stumbled across the song, Dame si vous m'estes lointaine. Everyone sings it -- Gothic Voices, Lucien Kandel, David Munrow. But I think not one of them comes close to the performance on this CD for beauty, alien beauty, and good judgement about tempo.

I got in trouble here once for saying that I was enjoying Ars Antiqua de Paris play De La Rue. I have a feeling this Machaut recording is going to become a favourite. I haven't heard the mass.
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Online Mandryka

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Re: Guillaume de Machaut (c.1300-1377)
« Reply #223 on: April 05, 2020, 07:30:51 PM »
<a href="https://youtube.com/v/vSOegklFtn0" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://youtube.com/v/vSOegklFtn0</a>

Not sure what to say about this almost madrigalesque mass performance with a viol, two barytones and a countertenor.
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Offline San Antone

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Re: Guillaume de Machaut (c.1300-1377)
« Reply #224 on: April 06, 2020, 02:23:24 AM »
<a href="https://youtube.com/v/vSOegklFtn0" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://youtube.com/v/vSOegklFtn0</a>

Not sure what to say about this almost madrigalesque mass performance with a viol, two barytones and a countertenor.

It is not bad, the singing is very good and the addition of the vielle is not nearly as intrusive as a horn or organ since it blends nicely with the voices.  OVPP is preferable IMO to the larger ensembles, and these three singers handle the polyphony handily.

But what is the MEC Early Music Consort?

Online Mandryka

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Re: Guillaume de Machaut (c.1300-1377)
« Reply #225 on: April 06, 2020, 02:33:21 AM »
It is not bad, the singing is very good and the addition of the vielle is not nearly as intrusive as a horn or organ since it blends nicely with the voices.  OVPP is preferable IMO to the larger ensembles, and these three singers handle the polyphony handily.


Yes, I agree I think, is there a reason for using the viol? I mean, is there a lot of music in the score which isn’t obviously associated with words? Maybe they were just four musicians who wanted to find a way to play it because they liked it.

Everyone seems to want to say vielle here, but isn’t it another words for viola da gamba? I’m never sure about instruments, there are so many of ‘em!
« Last Edit: April 06, 2020, 02:35:15 AM by Mandryka »
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Offline San Antone

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Re: Guillaume de Machaut (c.1300-1377)
« Reply #226 on: April 06, 2020, 02:43:31 AM »
Yes, I agree I think, is there a reason for using the viol? I mean, is there a lot of music in the score which isn’t obviously associated with words? Maybe they were just four musicians who wanted to find a way to play it because they liked it.

Everyone seems to want to say vielle here, but isn’t it another words for viola da gamba? I’m never sure about instruments, there are so many of ‘em!

Here's the description of a vielle: The vielle /viˈɛl/ is a European bowed stringed instrument used in the Medieval period, similar to a modern violin but with a somewhat longer and deeper body, three to five gut strings, and a leaf-shaped pegbox with frontal tuning pegs, sometimes with a figure-8 shaped body.



I won't debate the use of instruments in Machaut's messe.   ;)

Online Mandryka

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Re: Guillaume de Machaut (c.1300-1377)
« Reply #227 on: April 07, 2020, 06:55:36 AM »
Ah yes, I remember vielles now.

Listening to that performance of the mass with the vielle, it’s just not for me I think, though I may have enjoyed being at the concert. It may well be well sung in some sense but the countertenor just doesn’t excite my imagination.

I listened to Lucian Kandel this morning with the mass, and particularly enjoyed the organ in the Kyrie /Christie /Kyrie
« Last Edit: April 07, 2020, 07:01:11 AM by Mandryka »
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Offline (: premont :)

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Re: Guillaume de Machaut (c.1300-1377)
« Reply #228 on: April 07, 2020, 09:23:21 AM »
Ah yes, I remember vielles now.

Listening to that performance of the mass with the vielle, it’s just not for me I think, though I may have enjoyed being at the concert. It may well be well sung in some sense but the countertenor just doesn’t excite my imagination.

I listened to Lucian Kandel this morning with the mass, and particularly enjoyed the organ in the Kyrie /Christie /Kyrie

The scoring in this recording is:

Triplum: countertenor
Motetus: vielle
Contratenor: baryton
Tenor(cantus firmus): baryton

The sophisticated effect of this mass depends much upon the interplay between the two upper parts, which for that reason ought to be sung by two similar voices, ideally two high tenors. In the same way the two lower parts ask for similar voice-quality, ideally two basses. In this version the mass is transposed upwards and the interplay between the two upper parts is spoilt by using so different timbres. Other than that I am not a great fan of the unsubstantiated use of countertenors in Medieval music. The interpretation here is also much too "sweet" for Machaut's often "raw" harmonies. So from me: Thumbs down.
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Online Mandryka

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Re: Guillaume de Machaut (c.1300-1377)
« Reply #229 on: June 13, 2021, 04:36:07 AM »
<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/iKs9DO6F0pQ&amp;ab_channel=AppleKadenz" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/iKs9DO6F0pQ&amp;ab_channel=AppleKadenz</a>

Vocaloid  is a computer program. You input a score and it turns it into singing, the voices are synthetic and pop.

The above is the Gloria of Machaut's mass.
« Last Edit: June 13, 2021, 04:37:56 AM by Mandryka »
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