Author Topic: Dmitri's Dacha  (Read 521888 times)

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Offline Maestro267

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Re: Dmitri's Dacha
« Reply #2680 on: September 25, 2021, 09:41:27 PM »
I've listened to a lot of Shostakovich in the last week or so. I'm currently listening to the 10th Symphony, and when I finish I'll have just No. 7 left to complete the cycle.

I noticed there isn't really a slow movement in No. 10. The first movement probably comes closest in mood but even then it's marked Moderato. There is also the lengthy slow introduction to the finale but that's not a full movement in its own right.

Offline OrchestralNut

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  • Krzysztof Penderecki (1933-2020)
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Re: Dmitri's Dacha
« Reply #2681 on: Today at 02:29:45 AM »
Once again the Violin Concerto No. 1 manages to astound me. It strikes me like a genuine masterpiece in any standard. Wow, all the movements are eloquently and uniformly brilliant in conception and technique, mastery. Mordkovitch is on fire along with Järvi and the Scottish N. O.

What are your other favorite recordings on this unique creation?

My favourite violin concerto of any composer.

That is indeed a great recording, along with Mullova/Previn.

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Dmitri's Dacha
« Reply #2682 on: Today at 05:44:28 AM »
I've listened to a lot of Shostakovich in the last week or so. I'm currently listening to the 10th Symphony, and when I finish I'll have just No. 7 left to complete the cycle.

I noticed there isn't really a slow movement in No. 10. The first movement probably comes closest in mood but even then it's marked Moderato. There is also the lengthy slow introduction to the finale but that's not a full movement in its own right.

Saved the best for last, eh? ;) But seriously, the 7th is dozy of a symphony, but under the right baton, it is an extraordinary work. As for the 10th lacking a slow movement, as you pointed out, there are plenty of sections throughout the symphony that could be slow movements.
"When a man is in despair, it means that he still believes in something." - Dmitri Shostakovich