George Lloyd

Started by Thom, April 14, 2007, 12:37:44 PM

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Albion

Slightly puzzling is the placing of Symphony No.2 before Symphony No.1 on the first disc of the set, which is otherwise chronological. But never mind, as long as these re-releases give Lloyd a wider audience...
A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it. (SG, 1922)

Albion

Whilst Lyrita are sure to reissue "Iernin", the excerpts from "John Socman" and Orchestral Suite No.1 from "The Serf", it would be wonderful if they could license the complete BBC broadcast of "John Socman" conducted by Edward Downes in 1982. I have this in an off-air recording and it is splendid.I suppose it's too much to ask for a complete recording of "The Serf" although a BBC studio broadcast was almost finalised and cast in 1990 under Downes but then abandoned...
A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it. (SG, 1922)

Maestro267

Quote from: foxandpeng on February 03, 2024, 07:44:54 AMNo such hints on the ol' Spotify yet. Thankfully, Hyperion are being more profligate with their catalogue, so as to offset my disappointment.

Spotify tends to upload the whole albums when they're fully released, as opposed to how it seems to be on Qobuz. So assuming the March 1st release date for Symphonies 1-6 is correct they could well be on Spotify that day.

foxandpeng

Quote from: Maestro267 on February 04, 2024, 12:00:56 PMSpotify tends to upload the whole albums when they're fully released, as opposed to how it seems to be on Qobuz. So assuming the March 1st release date for Symphonies 1-6 is correct they could well be on Spotify that day.

I do hope so! Thank you 😁
"A quiet secluded life in the country, with the possibility of being useful to people ... then work which one hopes may be of some use; then rest, nature, books, music, love for one's neighbour — such is my idea of happiness"

Tolstoy

Harry

#584
Well, well, at JPC the first box is available the first of March, a 4 CD'S at the price of 19,95 euros.
that's a pretty good price me thinks.
Every man who thinks he is something is nothing.
The man who is something is whoever thinks he is nothing.
Carmina Proverbialia 22.

Maestro267

Didn't know CPO was also a shop. I assume it's related to the record label?

Harry

Quote from: Maestro267 on February 05, 2024, 09:42:00 AMDidn't know CPO was also a shop. I assume it's related to the record label?

I meant JPC, I was not yet quite awake at that moment, me thinks.
Every man who thinks he is something is nothing.
The man who is something is whoever thinks he is nothing.
Carmina Proverbialia 22.

vandermolen

Quote from: kyjo on December 23, 2023, 09:01:26 PMAs much as I love Lloyd's music generally, I have to concede that he had his off days. I recently ordered a physical copy of this CD (since it's not available on streaming), and upon listening, realized I hadn't really been missing out on any masterpieces in his oeuvre:



The PC no. 1, subtitled Scapegoat (for reasons I'm not entirely sure of), is not a bad piece overall - it's predominantly darker and more dissonant than most of Lloyd's other works. There's a characteristically upbeat, catchy Lloydian tune about 3/4 of the way in, that, to my annoyance, only makes one appearance throughout the whole work! The concerto ends in a downbeat, inconclusive, and disappointing manner (maybe intentionally). The PC no. 2 I wasn't really convinced by, though maybe I was just in a bad mood the day I listened. It's structurally a bit disjunct, with some sections that verge on being banal/annoying. The most interesting part is the cadenza where the piano is repeatedly interrupted by the snare drum in a threatening, Nielsenesque manner. These works might grow on me with subsequent listens, but at the moment I certainly wouldn't rank them among the finer entries in Lloyd's output.
I rather like Lloyd's piano concerto 'Scapegoat'. I also like the 3rd Piano Concerto which reminds me of Khachaturian and the memorable opening movement of No.4.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).