Author Topic: Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)  (Read 209211 times)

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Offline Jo498

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Re: Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)
« Reply #1060 on: January 08, 2020, 12:48:38 AM »
I think the Katchen still deserves its reputation and is overall very impressive. Admittedly, I am not an expert on this music but a professional pianist I know somewhat (and who plays a lot of Brahms himself) still recommends it as first choice.
As Brahms' piano music is somewhat uneven (not mainly in quality but stylistically and chronologically scattered over his lifetime), I think there is a pretty good justification to "mix and match", at least after having covered the whole body of work once. I don't know them, but Radu Lupu's incomplete Brahms is regarded very highly.
Among my favorites are the Rubinstein recordings, unfortunately very incomplete (none of the big variations) and scattered throughout several discs in the different Rubinstein collections/editions.
Struck by the sounds before the sun,
I knew the night had gone.
The morning breeze like a bugle blew
Against the drums of dawn.
(Bob Dylan)

Offline Symphonic Addict

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Re: Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)
« Reply #1061 on: February 01, 2020, 04:08:02 PM »
I've always had thought that the Piano Trio in A major, Op. posth was, in fact, his last piano trio. Sounds masterly. Also, curious that Brahms never composed a proper string trio or suites for solo cello. Even his musical heroes did do it, at least one of them if applies (Mozart, Beethoven, Bach).

With 3 violin sonatas, 2 cello sonatas, 2 clarinet sonatas,  3 string quartets, 3 + Op.posth piano trios, 3 piano quartets, 2 string quintets, 2 string sextets, 1 piano quintet, 1 trio for horn, 1 clarinet trio, 1 clarinet quintet, what do you consider his absolute best and favorite 5 chamber works? Mine in opus order:

Piano Trio No. 1, Op. 8
String Sextet No. 1, Op. 18
Piano Quartet No. 3, Op. 60
String Quartet No. 3, Op. 67
String Quintet No. 2, Op. 111

Offline Madiel

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Re: Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)
« Reply #1062 on: February 01, 2020, 05:03:42 PM »
I've always had thought that the Piano Trio in A major, Op. posth was, in fact, his last piano trio.

It's highly doubtful it's even his. And if it is, it's early.
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Offline Jo498

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Re: Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)
« Reply #1063 on: February 02, 2020, 12:43:50 AM »
Hardly anybody composed suites for Solo Cello between Bach and Reger. And string trios became very rare after Beethoven who stopped writing them once he had started quartets, so it's not very surprising that Brahms didn't write any.

My favorites are probably

piano quintet
clarinet quintet
violin sonata G major op.78
clarinet sonata E flat major op.120/2
piano quartet g minor or maybe the c minor

But I love almost all of his chamber music, the least favorite piece being probably the 2nd cello sonata
Struck by the sounds before the sun,
I knew the night had gone.
The morning breeze like a bugle blew
Against the drums of dawn.
(Bob Dylan)

Offline vers la flamme

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Re: Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)
« Reply #1064 on: May 07, 2020, 02:42:40 PM »
Bump for Brahms on his birthday   :)

Who else is listening to Brahms today? So far the Tragic Overture, the Alto Rhapsody, the Violin Concerto, the Haydn Variations, the Clarinet Quintet & Trio, the Piano Quintet, & now a selection of Lieder w/ Jessye Norman & Daniel Barenboim. What a composer. Thank God for Brahms...


Offline Dowder

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Re: Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)
« Reply #1065 on: May 07, 2020, 03:32:58 PM »
Symphony No 4 this morning.  8)
”But what is government but the greatest of all reflections on human nature? If men were angels, no government would be necessary. If angels were to govern men neither external nor internal controls on government would be necessary.”~~James Madison, Federalist 51

Offline vers la flamme

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Re: Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)
« Reply #1066 on: May 08, 2020, 01:11:18 AM »
Just a handful of intermezzi for me this morning, from op.117 and op.118; and the first movement of the German Requiem (decided I wasn't in the mood for the whole thing).

Online Mandryka

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Re: Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)
« Reply #1067 on: May 08, 2020, 08:04:17 AM »
Just a handful of intermezzi for me this morning, from op.117 and op.118; and the first movement of the German Requiem (decided I wasn't in the mood for the whole thing).

Well that prompted me to check this out, through qobuz, and indeed it is there.



First impressions . . . well someone I know used to refer to Sokolov's late Brahms as gothic -- dark, mournful, mysterious and heavy.  The musical equivalent of this



« Last Edit: May 08, 2020, 08:09:06 AM by Mandryka »
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Offline hvbias

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Re: Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)
« Reply #1068 on: May 08, 2020, 08:15:29 AM »
On Sokolov disc - got a bit lightheaded when I misread the third piano sonata as being Brahms and not Beethoven, damn :(

Offline Jo498

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Re: Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)
« Reply #1069 on: May 08, 2020, 09:04:50 AM »
There is a Brahms op.5 + op.10 Ballades with Sokolov from the 1990s on op.111/Naive.
Struck by the sounds before the sun,
I knew the night had gone.
The morning breeze like a bugle blew
Against the drums of dawn.
(Bob Dylan)

Offline Florestan

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Re: Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)
« Reply #1070 on: May 08, 2020, 09:48:15 AM »
dark, mournful, mysterious and heavy.  The musical equivalent of this



You kidding, right? The image above is anything but dark, mournful, mysterious and heavy. On the contrary, it's clownish and laughable.

If you want really dark, mournful, mysterious and heavy, take this:





“I compose music because I must give expression to my feelings, just as I talk because I must give utterance to my thoughts.” --- Rachmaninoff

Online Mandryka

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Re: Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)
« Reply #1071 on: May 11, 2020, 12:14:58 PM »
You kidding, right? The image above is anything but dark, mournful, mysterious and heavy. On the contrary, it's clownish and laughable.

If you want really dark, mournful, mysterious and heavy, take this:



Whatever the picture, you need to hear the performances. Some of the most interesting Brahms playing in a long time.  Very much in the spirit of his Chopin preludes.  Not sure about the sound quality - it’s live, I’m a in the front row or turning the pages - not ideal for me.

What I want to say is this: in this Brahms, you know you’re listening to the greatest living pianist.
« Last Edit: May 11, 2020, 12:23:00 PM by Mandryka »
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Offline vers la flamme

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Re: Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)
« Reply #1072 on: May 11, 2020, 12:52:16 PM »
Whatever the picture, you need to hear the performances. Some of the most interesting Brahms playing in a long time.  Very much in the spirit of his Chopin preludes.  Not sure about the sound quality - it’s live, I’m a in the front row or turning the pages - not ideal for me.

What I want to say is this: in this Brahms, you know you’re listening to the greatest living pianist.

Wow. High praise. All right, I'll definitely have to check it out. I have a bootleg from some live performance or another (maybe a variety of performances) w/ op.79, op.116, & op.117—haven't heard it in a while but I remember being really impressed with Sokolov's playing. If you want it, it's yours.

Question: Why do I see the same album cover for this new DG release in versions with both "Beethoven * Brahms" & "Beethoven * Brahms * Mozart"...?
« Last Edit: May 11, 2020, 12:54:09 PM by vers la flamme »

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)
« Reply #1073 on: May 11, 2020, 12:55:05 PM »
If you want really dark, mournful, mysterious and heavy, take this:



A remarkable painting. Love Friedrich’s work.
“Works of art create rules; rules do not create works of art.” - Claude Debussy

Offline vers la flamme

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Re: Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)
« Reply #1074 on: May 11, 2020, 12:58:42 PM »
Re: that Friedrich painting, it's used on the original jacket artwork for Klemperer's Mahler 4th, a very unusual choice I think. But it does seem to go hand-in-hand with the fact that Klemperer's performance explores a somewhat darker dimension of the work.