Author Topic: mini-blind comparison - Mahler Symphony 7 Nachtmusik I  (Read 1250 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Jo498

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 4917
  • Location: Germany
Re: mini-blind comparison - Mahler Symphony 7 Nachtmusik I
« Reply #60 on: July 15, 2020, 11:06:39 PM »
Interesting. I didn't get around to group C and my notes are very sparse, but I did like a2 (Bernstein, among the most "poetic" of the 8 I listened to, I have his in a box but don't think I have ever listened to it) and b4 (Gielen, one of the most detailed, and while I didn't recognize it this is the recording of the piece I have had for the longest time). I also liked a3 (Abbado) for its sense of urgency.
b1 (Boulez) I found too fast.

BTW the studio recording by Scherchen (Westminster) is pretty good and very "sane" for Scherchen's standards. Sound is decent studio mono.
Struck by the sounds before the sun,
I knew the night had gone.
The morning breeze like a bugle blew
Against the drums of dawn.
(Bob Dylan)

Online MusicTurner

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1105
  • Location: Cph
Re: mini-blind comparison - Mahler Symphony 7 Nachtmusik I
« Reply #61 on: July 15, 2020, 11:27:49 PM »
(...)

BTW the studio recording by Scherchen (Westminster) is pretty good and very "sane" for Scherchen's standards. Sound is decent studio mono.

Yes, the Toronto 1965 is more 'special' and wilder musically, than his 1950 and 1953 recordings.
1950 21:02 14:34 9:00 13:37 16:05
1953 20:43 15:41 9:10 14:27 17:59
1965 18:33 12:53 8:17 13:00 16:38

Gielen
1993 21:53 16:43 9:43 12:55 18:10

Bernstein NYPO
1965 20:51 16:41 9:37 14:38 17:55
« Last Edit: July 15, 2020, 11:34:35 PM by MusicTurner »

Offline Sergeant Rock

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 22455
  • Location: Wine Country Germany
Re: mini-blind comparison - Mahler Symphony 7 Nachtmusik I
« Reply #62 on: July 16, 2020, 04:10:43 AM »
1st scoring 20.5 or 103%  ??? in round 1, and level top in round 2, is A2/F3:
"This recording really captures the musical momentum and drive of the work, all of its shifts in color and tone. Very detailed
"Good cowbells. I like the slower pace which brings out the "tango" rhythm (3:31) to spooky, and sleazy effect
"The basses are ominous, the ff  "slide" in the strings is much more unsettling than in A1.  The slower tempo is to my liking.
"This is a subtler approach, which I prefer. Darkness and lightness is much better caught here

A2/F3 is Leonard Bernstein / NYPO / CBS 1965


I had to choose between this, the oldest recording of the twelve - and his later recording on DG - but on listening to the two, it was no contest.

You chose correctly, at least in my opinion. Lenny's Columbia/Sony M7 co-reigns at the top (along with Klemp) of my collection (24 Sevenths). Very happy to see it winning. Gielen surprised because overall his cycle is one I don't much appreciate. Obviously his Seventh is one I have to give more attention to and may be the pick of the litter.

Thanks aukhawk for giving us a great and fun comparison.

Sarge
« Last Edit: July 16, 2020, 04:15:05 AM by Sergeant Rock »
the phone rings and somebody says,
"hey, they made a movie about
Mahler, you ought to go see it.
he was as f*cked-up as you are."
                               --Charles Bukowski, "Mahler"

Offline Cato

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 8980
  • An American Hero!
Re: mini-blind comparison - Mahler Symphony 7 Nachtmusik I
« Reply #63 on: July 16, 2020, 05:55:34 AM »
You chose correctly, at least in my opinion. Lenny's Columbia/Sony M7 co-reigns at the top (along with Klemp) of my collection (24 Sevenths). Very happy to see it winning. Gielen surprised because overall his cycle is one I don't much appreciate. Obviously his Seventh is one I have to give more attention to and may be the pick of the litter.

Thanks aukhawk for giving us a great and fun comparison.

Sarge

Yes, many thanks!  I do not have the resources to do such things, so your efforts are greatly appreciated.

Leonard Bernstein was something of a natural for Mahler: I always liked his conducting of the Eighth Symphony on Columbia.  And yes, his conducting mid-career of Mahler seems to outrank, in general, his later work.
"Meet Miss Ruth Sherwood, from Columbus, Ohio, the Middle of the Universe!"

- Brian Aherne introducing Rosalind Russell in  My Sister Eileen (1942)

Offline aukhawk

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1238
  • Frankie
  • Location: England
  • Currently Listening to:
    Bach to Björk
Re: mini-blind comparison - Mahler Symphony 7 Nachtmusik I
« Reply #64 on: July 16, 2020, 06:13:34 AM »
My pleasure - I enjoyed it.  8)

Offline Mahlerian

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 3293
Re: mini-blind comparison - Mahler Symphony 7 Nachtmusik I
« Reply #65 on: July 16, 2020, 06:32:17 AM »
Mahlerian?  (You could have a casting vote here!   ???  )  (In fact - c'mon - tell us who they are  ;D )

Whoops, sorry for not showing up to vote at the end. I didn't expect Gielen to do so well, fine conductor though he is! Thanks again for running this.
"l do not consider my music as atonal, but rather as non-tonal. I feel the unity of all keys. Atonal music by modern composers admits of no key at all, no feeling of any definite center." - Arnold Schoenberg

Offline mc ukrneal

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 9118
Re: mini-blind comparison - Mahler Symphony 7 Nachtmusik I
« Reply #66 on: July 16, 2020, 04:57:44 PM »
Well, imagine that - two big Mahler conductors fighting it out for the top spot neck and neck. I'm also interested to hear more of the Vanska - it sounded very good. But I love the process - it's very instructive and I find it helps hone my ear on a piece.

Thanks again for putting it together aukhawk!
Be kind to your fellow posters!!

Offline aukhawk

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1238
  • Frankie
  • Location: England
  • Currently Listening to:
    Bach to Björk
Re: mini-blind comparison - Mahler Symphony 7 Nachtmusik I
« Reply #67 on: July 17, 2020, 03:32:10 AM »
I think this worked because of the nature of the music - very episodic and varied of texture - very typical of mid-period Mahler.  Not all music would lend itself in this way - Rite of Spring probably would, and Symphonie Fantastique (been done) - but not Isle of the Dead, or a Haydn String Quartet Op.20 - to mention just two I have considered and auditioned, but regretfully decided against.  Bartok Strings, Percussion and Celesta I think could work - but I tried that back in 2015 and it was stillborn, maybe I just chose the wrong extract.  Shostakovich Symphony 1 or maybe 15 would probably work quite well (and, to my shame, I've certainly got more than enough recordings of both those  :-[ )
« Last Edit: July 17, 2020, 03:34:21 AM by aukhawk »

Offline MishaK

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 3782
Re: mini-blind comparison - Mahler Symphony 7 Nachtmusik I
« Reply #68 on: July 31, 2020, 01:11:27 PM »
Man, I am sorry I missed this blind comparison. I'm gonna have to check out that Vänskä recording.

Just two notes on the CSO/Boulez clip linked earlier in this thread.

I love watching Boulez conduct!

[edit: hmm, his style mellowed somewhat since his days in charge of the BBC SO - a lot of finger-pointing and wrist-twiddling then.

I would say that has to do with his relationship with the CSO. Firstly, that orchestra is on a different level than the BBCSO of decades ago. Secondly, the CSO had a very close relationship with and deep respect for Boulez for nearly the last three decades of his life. He simply didn't need to give that many directions to them, as they knew exactly what he wanted.

I have checked the Chicago Symphony website, but so far this performance has not been released.

This was never meant to be a commercial recording. It was filmed for a PBS "Great Performances" broadcast. It also was never meant to be a Pierre Boulez concert! Muti was supposed to conduct that week and the PBS broadcast was meant to feature him. But Muti cancelled several months of concerts for medical reasons and went home to Italy. IIRC, Boulez happened to be in town and available, so he took over (and changed the program - I don't remember what Muti had originally programmed for that week). And being a superstar himself, PBS was happy to keep the broadcast appointment. I was at this concert. What was even better, but unfortunately not preserved on video, was a performance Boulez conducted a few weeks later of Janacek's Glagolitic mass, with Paul Jacobs on organ. That was ridiculously good.