Author Topic: Max Reger(1873-1916)  (Read 24201 times)

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Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Max Reger(1873-1916)
« Reply #200 on: July 19, 2020, 06:16:17 AM »
much better idea to get a couple of recordings and enjoy the music as music.

Well, I’ve got a good bit of Reger on disc (several box sets and single issues), but I’m not sure about the enjoying part just yet. ;)
“Works of art create rules; rules do not create works of art.” - Claude Debussy

Offline Herman

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Re: Max Reger(1873-1916)
« Reply #201 on: July 19, 2020, 10:09:46 AM »
The last part sounds like a typical ol' time "That's what my wife said last night" bad joke.

https://interlude.hk/always-trust-mother-law-max-elsa-reger/

The link explains a lot about the dour faces on pictures of the Regers.
« Last Edit: July 19, 2020, 11:29:31 AM by Herman »

Offline Dry Brett Kavanaugh

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Re: Max Reger(1873-1916)
« Reply #202 on: July 20, 2020, 09:07:56 AM »
Any opinion/info on these albums?
Thinking about buying them.
Thanks.

Offline Herman

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Re: Max Reger(1873-1916)
« Reply #203 on: July 22, 2020, 08:56:40 AM »
My GF is getting rather used to the sound of Reger's piano concerto coming from my study, because I'm still listening.

However, I've also been getting into the two big orchestral variation pieces, Hiller (op 100) and Mozart (op 132).

The Hiller Variations are larger and longer; the Mozart Variations are, of course, on the famous tune from Mozart's piano sonata in A minor. Both feature humor, a stunningly beautiful slow movement / variation with gorgeous long melodic lines in intricately divided string sections (sometimes divided in six just for the violins I and II) and a great fugue as the final movement.

The best recordings, as far as I can tell are in both works by Sir Colin Davis and the BRSO. I have no idea whether these still can be had.

There's a first-rate live performance of the Mozart Variations by the Frankfurt Rundfunk, cond Peter Eötvös, on youtube.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tflcg4yymr4&t=98s
« Last Edit: July 24, 2020, 03:54:00 AM by Herman »

Offline Herman

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Re: Max Reger(1873-1916)
« Reply #204 on: August 07, 2020, 01:06:42 AM »
Maybe I'm getting to be a bore, but I'm still listening to Reger's big orchestral variations.

The Mozart Variations may be the more perfect piece, exactly as long as it should be, but the Hiller Variations have huge attractions too. There's a kind of ribald humor in the piece, kind of a family resemblance to Beethoven's Diabellis. However, there's also two slow movements in the Hillers, first a typical Reger yearning hymn andante in 2/4+3/4 meter in A major and towards the end a big Andante in E major with great strings - winds contrasts and amazing chromatic lines hoovering the music ever upwards. Also, the concluding fugue is relatively simple, ending in a giant held E chord rivalling the end to Mahler 3.

Offline André

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Re: Max Reger(1873-1916)
« Reply #205 on: August 07, 2020, 04:31:44 AM »
I love the Hiller Variations, more than the Mozart ones actually. There’s a fantastical element that I find very fetching.

Offline Herman

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Re: Max Reger(1873-1916)
« Reply #206 on: August 07, 2020, 07:53:26 AM »
I love the Hiller Variations, more than the Mozart ones actually. There’s a fantastical element that I find very fetching.

at the mo I would agree, since the Hillers have been in my cd-player for more than a week now.

I love the  as if classical-ness of the Mozart Variations  -  with, mind you, a whole bit of churning Wagnerian chromaticism in the slow variation  -  and perhaps the concluding fugue is just a tad better.

However the Hillers have this same wild, crazy deep-in-the-night sound world as the piano concerto. They are op 100 and op 101.

The orchestration in both of these variation suites is just do die for. No triangle or other funny sound effects, just the technical mastery of mixing instrument groups and dividing instrument groups infinitely. Sometimes all the string groups are divided up, and you have four different lines in the violins alone.

Offline vers la flamme

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Re: Max Reger(1873-1916)
« Reply #207 on: August 07, 2020, 02:11:03 PM »
at the mo I would agree, since the Hillers have been in my cd-player for more than a week now.

I love the  as if classical-ness of the Mozart Variations  -  with, mind you, a whole bit of churning Wagnerian chromaticism in the slow variation  -  and perhaps the concluding fugue is just a tad better.

However the Hillers have this same wild, crazy deep-in-the-night sound world as the piano concerto. They are op 100 and op 101.

The orchestration in both of these variation suites is just do die for. No triangle or other funny sound effects, just the technical mastery of mixing instrument groups and dividing instrument groups infinitely. Sometimes all the string groups are divided up, and you have four different lines in the violins alone.

The way you describe the Piano Concerto makes it sound appealing. Is there a recording you particularly like?

Offline Herman

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Re: Max Reger(1873-1916)
« Reply #208 on: August 07, 2020, 06:23:56 PM »
I have Oppitz and the Bamberger Orchestra. But Hamelin seems to be fine, too.