Author Topic: The French Music Exploration thread  (Read 5696 times)

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Offline Papy Oli

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Re: The French Music Exploration thread
« Reply #20 on: September 15, 2020, 10:36:45 AM »
Goodness, that's a heck of a list of composers. With plenty of names that are largely just names to me (though I've no reason to doubt the quality).

Ibert falls into that category. I'm sure I've heard at least something, but not much. Guess I know what to try on my streaming service!

Feel free to get me started on Fauré's chamber music though, as it's one of my greatest loves in all music...

Looks like I might stay on Qobuz an extra month or three to get through that list after all ! Many of them are just names to me too. I'll make sure to give you a nudge whenever I get to Fauré, no worries  :)
Olivier

Offline Papy Oli

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Re: The French Music Exploration thread
« Reply #21 on: September 15, 2020, 10:38:15 AM »
Please add to your list:

Guy Ropartz (1864-1955). His compositions included five symphonies, three violin sonatas, cello sonatas, six string quartets, a piano trio and string trio (both in A minor), stage works, a number of choral works and other music, often alluding to his Breton heritage.

Wonderful composer.

Thank you OSA, I'll add it. The Breton element will be of particular interest.
Olivier

Offline Papy Oli

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Re: The French Music Exploration thread
« Reply #22 on: September 15, 2020, 10:40:57 AM »
I've been enjoying the Symphony in A major by the sadly short-lived but appropriately named Pierre-Octave Ferroud (1900-36). He was tragically decapitated in a car accident in Hungary. The style is kind-of Honegger meets Stravinsky but it held my attention throughout:

the Honegger element sounds enticing too. Added too. Thank you Jeffrey.
« Last Edit: September 15, 2020, 10:55:41 AM by Papy Oli »
Olivier

Offline Papy Oli

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Re: The French Music Exploration thread
« Reply #23 on: September 15, 2020, 10:54:20 AM »
I don't listen by nationality, but I couldn't help noticing that while Tristan Murail was on your list, Gérard Grisey was not.

Not too long ago, you would have never seen Murail's name except in conjunction with Grisey (1946-1998).

And, speaking of Murail, one thing I really missed on your list was composers with no date to the left of the hyphen.

I counted only two aside from Murail.

Oh well. Just a whole new world waiting for you whenever you're ready. :)

I picked up the Ferrari name from your list in the French composers top 10 thread. I had it in a corner of my brain somewhere you had made a case for his music in one thread or another in the past. I'll add Grisey as well, thank you.

Just to double their number, please can you give us another couple of names of living French composers that you think worthwhile (not "too" atonal if possible) ?
Olivier

Offline some guy

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Re: The French Music Exploration thread
« Reply #24 on: September 15, 2020, 02:25:51 PM »
I can easily do the living composers part. Less easy is the "not 'too' atonal" part.

So I'll take your "if possible" as an out. :)

First, I'd like to mention Pierre Henry, who died a couple of years ago. I saw him in concert shortly before that. He looked really sick. I've been listening to a lot of his music recently as part of my comprehensive ripping exercise. It's a lot better than I remembered it.

Anyway, on to the list:

Francis Dhomont (1926-    ) An important early pioneer of French electroacoustic music. Taught for many years in Montréal.
Éliane Radigue (1932-    ) Prominent French electroacoustic minimalist. (No, not the pattern or repetition type.)
Michèle Bokanowski (1943-    ) Known mostly for her music for husband Patrick's avant-garde films. But only mostly.
Jérome Noetinger (1966-    ) Electroacoustic improviser and composer. Often works with Lionel Marchetti (1967-    ).

There are many more, of course, especially if you include French-Canadian composers, who are easy to include if only because Dhomont taught in Montréal for so many years. (Gilles Gobeil (1954-    ) for instance.) But you've probably got enough on your plate to last you for a couple months or so....

Offline Mandryka

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Re: The French Music Exploration thread
« Reply #25 on: September 15, 2020, 06:37:39 PM »
This morning I’ve been listening to Hughes Dufourt, l’éclaire d’après Rimbaud. A few days ago I listened to a solo cello piece by Marc Monnet. Sainte Colombe père is one of my favourite composers, indeed many other French viol and lute composers - look through the viol and lute threads here. Bach appreciated Grigny; I appreciate Titelouze, the father of polyphonic organ music.

Qui dit Machaut dit Philippe de Vitry et qui dit Vitry dit un tas de troubadours. There’s a troubadour thread with some names.
« Last Edit: September 15, 2020, 07:06:27 PM by Mandryka »
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Offline André Le Nôtre

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Re: The French Music Exploration thread
« Reply #26 on: September 15, 2020, 07:56:37 PM »
Louis Aubert anyone? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louis_Aubert

Last year, we stayed in a very nice AirBNB flat in Paris (2nd Arrondissement). It was stuffed with beautiful antiques and curios from all over the world. On the fireplace mantel was a plaster bust of L. Aubert--possibly the only one in existence. I meant to ask our host, but she disappeared to Burgundy before I could think to ask her how she came upon such a piece.
« Last Edit: September 15, 2020, 08:05:33 PM by André Le Nôtre »

Offline aligreto

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Re: The French Music Exploration thread
« Reply #27 on: September 15, 2020, 11:37:09 PM »
Well done, Olivier. You have made a great start with this thread. I am sure that it will be a popular one as, based on your list above, there is something there for everyone.

I am no expert in this field but the one piece of advice that I would strongly offer is that whatever French composer’s orchestral music you are going to listen to try to get a listen to the Monteux version of it if he did one. I find him excellent in the field of French music in particular.
I see that you have already listened to Escales twice so far. I would be interested to know what you would think of the Monteux version [assuming that you like the work, of course]. It is an old recording which does show its age [get past that] but it is tremendously atmospheric, powerful and exotic and has a great presence. I am not sure if is available or not on those streaming services.



It is better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak and leave no doubt.

Offline Papy Oli

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Re: The French Music Exploration thread
« Reply #28 on: September 15, 2020, 11:38:12 PM »
I can easily do the living composers part. Less easy is the "not 'too' atonal" part.

So I'll take your "if possible" as an out. :)

First, I'd like to mention Pierre Henry, who died a couple of years ago. I saw him in concert shortly before that. He looked really sick. I've been listening to a lot of his music recently as part of my comprehensive ripping exercise. It's a lot better than I remembered it.

Anyway, on to the list:

Francis Dhomont (1926-    ) An important early pioneer of French electroacoustic music. Taught for many years in Montréal.
Éliane Radigue (1932-    ) Prominent French electroacoustic minimalist. (No, not the pattern or repetition type.)
Michèle Bokanowski (1943-    ) Known mostly for her music for husband Patrick's avant-garde films. But only mostly.
Jérome Noetinger (1966-    ) Electroacoustic improviser and composer. Often works with Lionel Marchetti (1967-    ).

There are many more, of course, especially if you include French-Canadian composers, who are easy to include if only because Dhomont taught in Montréal for so many years. (Gilles Gobeil (1954-    ) for instance.) But you've probably got enough on your plate to last you for a couple months or so....

Thank you for those. I have added Henry & Dhomont for now.   
Olivier

Offline Papy Oli

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Re: The French Music Exploration thread
« Reply #29 on: September 15, 2020, 11:40:17 PM »
This morning I’ve been listening to Hughes Dufourt, l’éclaire d’après Rimbaud. A few days ago I listened to a solo cello piece by Marc Monnet. Sainte Colombe père is one of my favourite composers, indeed many other French viol and lute composers - look through the viol and lute threads here. Bach appreciated Grigny; I appreciate Titelouze, the father of polyphonic organ music.

Qui dit Machaut dit Philippe de Vitry et qui dit Vitry dit un tas de troubadours. There’s a troubadour thread with some names.

Thank you Mandryka. Machaut being in the list, I'll add De Vitry and Sainte Colombe Père for now.
Olivier

Offline Papy Oli

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Re: The French Music Exploration thread
« Reply #30 on: September 15, 2020, 11:42:25 PM »
Olivier

Offline Papy Oli

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Re: The French Music Exploration thread
« Reply #31 on: September 15, 2020, 11:49:24 PM »
Well done, Olivier. You have made a great start with this thread. I am sure that it will be a popular one as, based on your list above, there is something there for everyone.

I am no expert in this field but the one piece of advice that I would strongly offer is that whatever French composer’s orchestral music you are going to listen to try to get a listen to the Monteux version of it if he did one. I find him excellent in the field of French music in particular.
I see that you have already listened to Escales twice so far. I would be interested to know what you would think of the Monteux version [assuming that you like the work, of course]. It is an old recording which does show its age [get past that] but it is tremendously atmospheric, powerful and exotic and has a great presence. I am not sure if is available or not on those streaming services.


Cheers Fergus.
I'll bear Monteux in mind and will see if I can find his Escales. More broadly, I'll indeed use that exercise to try alternative versions of works I already have too. For instance, the bulk of my Ravel and Debussy is a Martinon box and I don't know if my lack of success with those is down to me, the works or the Martinon version.
Olivier

Offline aligreto

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Re: The French Music Exploration thread
« Reply #32 on: September 16, 2020, 12:09:50 AM »
Cheers Fergus.
I'll bear Monteux in mind and will see if I can find his Escales. More broadly, I'll indeed use that exercise to try alternative versions of works I already have too. For instance, the bulk of my Ravel and Debussy is a Martinon box and I don't know if my lack of success with those is down to me, the works or the Martinon version.


That should be an interesting exercise Olivier. To be honest, I also find Martinon to be very good in French music. Perhaps you had better try non French conductors  ;D

I may be pushing the boat out here a little bit in terms of your musical preferences with regard to my recommendations for Ibert. I really like French music that is smaller in scale, for some reason. This, my first offering for Ibert, is a full concerto but it feels like a smaller scale work and only lasts for about nineteen minutes.


Ibert: Flute Concerto [Galway/Dutoit]





If you get itchy with the FF button in the first movement of this one Olivier listen to the slow movement in particular.
I find this concerto to be very buoyant, energetic and full of flair and excitement. Galway gives assertive and energetic performances in the outer movements and a soulful and atmospheric performance in the contemplative, pensive, and somewhat plaintive slow movement. The soloist in this concerto certainly earns their crust; the final movement is particularly challenging. Galway’s playing was always of the highest order.
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Offline Papy Oli

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Re: The French Music Exploration thread
« Reply #33 on: September 16, 2020, 12:27:16 AM »

That should be an interesting exercise Olivier. To be honest, I also find Martinon to be very good in French music. Perhaps you had better try non French conductors  ;D
I may be pushing the boat out here a little bit in terms of your musical preferences with regard to my recommendations for Ibert. I really like French music that is smaller in scale, for some reason. This, my first offering for Ibert, is a full concerto but it feels like a smaller scale work and only lasts for about nineteen minutes.

Ibert: Flute Concerto [Galway/Dutoit]

If you get itchy with the FF button in the first movement of this one Olivier listen to the slow movement in particular.
I find this concerto to be very buoyant, energetic and full of flair and excitement. Galway gives assertive and energetic performances in the outer movements and a soulful and atmospheric performance in the contemplative, pensive, and somewhat plaintive slow movement. The soloist in this concerto certainly earns their crust; the final movement is particularly challenging. Galway’s playing was always of the highest order.

I just checked the shelves and I actually have this particular work in the collection already!  :-[  Well, not technically mine, actually a Christmas present (a Galway boxset) to my partner (she used to play flute when she was younger) and Ibert's is in it. I'll queue that too. I did enjoy some of that boxset by the way, more than I expected to (again, the usual small chunks apply for this one, more to do with the instrument).

Also lined up for this morning, one last Ibert CD :



Olivier

Offline Papy Oli

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Re: The French Music Exploration thread
« Reply #34 on: September 16, 2020, 12:30:35 AM »
Note : For the sake of clarity and tracking, I have now moved Ibert from the composers list (in post #2) to another "Explored" list underneath (post #3 onwards), which will include the works listened to (and underlined the ones I particularly have found of interest).
« Last Edit: September 16, 2020, 02:12:51 AM by Papy Oli »
Olivier

Offline aligreto

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Re: The French Music Exploration thread
« Reply #35 on: September 16, 2020, 12:40:14 AM »
I just checked the shelves and I actually have this particular work in the collection already!  :-[  Well, not technically mine, actually a Christmas present (a Galway boxset) to my partner (she used to play flute when she was younger) and Ibert's is in it. I'll queue that too. I did enjoy some of that boxset by the way, more than I expected to (again, the usual small chunks apply for this one, more to do with the instrument).


Be careful there, Olivier. Listen to the flute concertos with headphones on. You may just kindle a rejuvenation in your partner’s flute playing career.  ;)  ;D

You could also try Ibert’s Concertino da camera for Alto Saxophone and 11 instruments for an intriguing and exciting sound world. I find it very colourful and energetic with its rich and varied musical language, tones and moods. I find it very engaging music.





I find this work to be a very colourful and energetic one with its rich and varied musical language, tones and moods. I find it very exciting music.
It is better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak and leave no doubt.

Offline aligreto

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Re: The French Music Exploration thread
« Reply #36 on: September 16, 2020, 12:56:29 AM »
One final recommendation for Ibert, Olivier. Once again I may be pushing your boundaries a bit but, hey, that is what this is all about.  ;D


Ibert: Trois pieces breves This is another short work that I really like. It is very inventive and beguiling music and refreshingly whimsical.






That CD is, in my opinion, indispensable for exploring French Chamber Music. I certainly recommend it to those who have not heard it yet.

It is better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak and leave no doubt.

Offline Ten thumbs

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Re: The French Music Exploration thread
« Reply #37 on: September 16, 2020, 01:06:23 AM »
Another composer you should not overlook is Mel Bonis (1858-1937).
A day may be a destiny; for life
Lives in but little—but that little teems
With some one chance, the balance of all time:
A look—a word—and we are wholly changed.

Offline Papy Oli

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Re: The French Music Exploration thread
« Reply #38 on: September 16, 2020, 02:14:27 AM »
Be careful there, Olivier. Listen to the flute concertos with headphones on. You may just kindle a rejuvenation in your partner’s flute playing career.  ;)  ;D

You could also try Ibert’s Concertino da camera for Alto Saxophone and 11 instruments for an intriguing and exciting sound world. I find it very colourful and energetic with its rich and varied musical language, tones and moods. I find it very engaging music.



I find this work to be a very colourful and energetic one with its rich and varied musical language, tones and moods. I find it very exciting music.

 ;D

Can't find that particular version but i have saved another one thank you.
Olivier

Offline Papy Oli

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Re: The French Music Exploration thread
« Reply #39 on: September 16, 2020, 02:17:04 AM »
One final recommendation for Ibert, Olivier. Once again I may be pushing your boundaries a bit but, hey, that is what this is all about.  ;D

Ibert: Trois pieces breves This is another short work that I really like. It is very inventive and beguiling music and refreshingly whimsical.



That CD is, in my opinion, indispensable for exploring French Chamber Music. I certainly recommend it to those who have not heard it yet.

I have listened to 3 pieces breves already (reply #9) and enjoyed it. I have that CD above already queued  :)
« Last Edit: September 16, 2020, 02:21:57 AM by Papy Oli »
Olivier