Author Topic: The impact of music streaming services  (Read 2892 times)

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Offline Holden

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Re: The impact of music streaming services
« Reply #80 on: September 12, 2020, 10:45:00 PM »
This would not be lawful. I know people do it, but for all the laws I know, you're not allowed to keep a rip if you no longer own the CD (and that's in the places where ripping itself is legal).

As far as Australia is concerned I have to disagree. You bought the music and therefore paid the royalty. You can store this any way that you want. What is probably illegal is broadcasting it publicly, even in a private venue but everyone does it any way. At the end of the last century CD manufacturers brought in DRM to try and prevent ripping. The immediate response from the software companies quickly made DRM obsolete.

This all moot today anyway. The majority of people now stream their music and the royalties are paid back to artists either via free version advertising or paying a subscription as you would do with Spotify, Apple Music, Amazon Prime, to name a few.
« Last Edit: September 12, 2020, 10:49:51 PM by Holden »
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Offline Madiel

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Re: The impact of music streaming services
« Reply #81 on: September 12, 2020, 11:14:22 PM »
As far as Australia is concerned I have to disagree. You bought the music and therefore paid the royalty. You can store this any way that you want.

How is this inconsistent with that I said? This is the Australian law. Yes, you can store in another format.

What you can NOT do is then recoup the money that you paid while keeping that copy in another format. Otherwise, it's not a question of whether you paid the royalty, it's whether you and your 9 friends paid 10 royalties or just paid 1 and passed the original disc between yourselves so that you effectively got 10 people got 10 discs for the price of 1. The notion that because YOU paid the royalty, you can then act to deprive the copyright owner of getting more royalties from others is just wrong.

If you paid for one copy, then it's not okay for you to create a situation where multiple people now have copies. The permission is only to have multiple formats for yourself. If you sell the music, then you don't get to simultaneously keep the music. You cannot "store" and "get rid of" at the same time. The Copyright Act has quite explicit statements to the effect that the exception for making these sorts of copies stops applying if you sell or hire the original.
« Last Edit: September 12, 2020, 11:28:21 PM by Madiel »
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Offline Holden

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Re: The impact of music streaming services
« Reply #82 on: September 13, 2020, 10:37:08 PM »
Hello Madiel, I never said that I sold my CDs so I'm not sure what the issue is here? The point I'm making is that you can legally back up your CDs onto a HDD without any fear of penalty. If you can show me Australian legislation that says I can't then I will look at it.
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Offline Madiel

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Re: The impact of music streaming services
« Reply #83 on: September 13, 2020, 11:47:56 PM »
Hello Madiel, I never said that I sold my CDs so I'm not sure what the issue is here? The point I'm making is that you can legally back up your CDs onto a HDD without any fear of penalty. If you can show me Australian legislation that says I can't then I will look at it.

Sigh. Maybe if you actually read the context of my statement before leaping in as if I was talking about you????

You've literally jumped in to say that I'm wrong and then said exactly the same thing that I said. And now you're STILL not reading what I actually said.

For the third time: you're allowed to back up your CDs. I really have said that three times now. You're not allowed to then get rid of the CDs. For one thing that's not what a "back up" is.

It's section 109A of the Copyright Act. Or you could just read either of these:

http://www.musicrights.com.au/fact-sheets/formatshifting/

https://www.communications.gov.au/documents/short-guide-copyright
« Last Edit: September 14, 2020, 12:04:36 AM by Madiel »
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Offline Holden

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Re: The impact of music streaming services
« Reply #84 on: September 14, 2020, 09:09:55 AM »
OK, thanks for clearing that up for me.
Cheers

Holden