Author Topic: Avant garde flutes and reeds  (Read 1427 times)

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Online Mandryka

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Re: Avant garde flutes and reeds
« Reply #20 on: January 20, 2021, 05:19:58 AM »


Slightly enjoying Aldo Clementi’s Fantasi su RoBErto FABriciAni on this, in a masochistic sort of way - can someone tell me what the story is behind those capital letters? The sound makes me think of Feldman’s For Samuel Beckett, but I can listen to this for longer (can’t abide the Feldman!) Clementi is, IMO, the vaguely acceptable face of ostinato based minimalism.

Came to Clementi via Christopher Fox. I also think there’s a connection to Michael Finnissy. He’s a respected, if not loved, composer I suppose.
« Last Edit: January 20, 2021, 05:37:19 AM by Mandryka »
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Offline T. D.

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Re: Avant garde flutes and reeds
« Reply #21 on: January 28, 2021, 07:43:27 PM »
This flute project by Claire Chase is interesting:

https://www.corbettvsdempsey.com/2020/11/19/claire-chase/

I'll have to listen to as many online clips as I can find before saying more.

Blurb from above site:

In 2013, Claire Chase instigated a project designed to cultivate an entirely new body of work for flute. A MacArthur Fellow, Harvard professor, and indomitable musical force who co-founded the International Contemporary Ensemble, Chase began commissioning work, with the idea of doing so until thecentennial of Edgard Varése's seminal flute solo "Density 21.5," in 2036. This deluxe 4-CD set is the first fruit of these commissions, realized in the first three years of the project, featuring 17 works by 15 composers, including the multi-part album-long composition "Pan" by Brazilian-born Marcos Balter. Composers wrote for all members of Chase's flute family, from piccolo to "Big Bertha" (her contrabass flute), as well as electronics, voice, and a handful of other instruments. Tyshawn Sorey performed percussion on his contribution and Suzanne Farrin played Ondes Martenot on hers; Roomful of Teeth collaborate with Chase on one piece, and sound designer Levy Lorenzo handles the electronics throughout. Participants come from a wide range of creative contemporary music circles; they include Richard Beaudoin, Nathan Davis, Jason Eckardt, Dai Fujikura, Vijay Iyer, Felipe Lara, Mario Diaz de Leon, George Lewis, Pauline Oliveros, Pauchi Sasaki, Francesca Verunelli, and Du Yun. The exquisitely detailed recordings of Density 2036 were made at the Meyer Sound Laboratories in Berkeley and produced by Matias Tarnopolsky over the course of four years, with no overdubbing or corrections, presenting Chase's incredible musicality in all its glory.

Offline Old San Antone

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Re: Avant garde flutes and reeds
« Reply #22 on: January 29, 2021, 04:24:47 AM »
This flute project by Claire Chase is interesting:

https://www.corbettvsdempsey.com/2020/11/19/claire-chase/

I'll have to listen to as many online clips as I can find before saying more.

Blurb from above site:

In 2013, Claire Chase instigated a project designed to cultivate an entirely new body of work for flute. A MacArthur Fellow, Harvard professor, and indomitable musical force who co-founded the International Contemporary Ensemble, Chase began commissioning work, with the idea of doing so until thecentennial of Edgard Varése's seminal flute solo "Density 21.5," in 2036. This deluxe 4-CD set is the first fruit of these commissions, realized in the first three years of the project, featuring 17 works by 15 composers, including the multi-part album-long composition "Pan" by Brazilian-born Marcos Balter. Composers wrote for all members of Chase's flute family, from piccolo to "Big Bertha" (her contrabass flute), as well as electronics, voice, and a handful of other instruments. Tyshawn Sorey performed percussion on his contribution and Suzanne Farrin played Ondes Martenot on hers; Roomful of Teeth collaborate with Chase on one piece, and sound designer Levy Lorenzo handles the electronics throughout. Participants come from a wide range of creative contemporary music circles; they include Richard Beaudoin, Nathan Davis, Jason Eckardt, Dai Fujikura, Vijay Iyer, Felipe Lara, Mario Diaz de Leon, George Lewis, Pauline Oliveros, Pauchi Sasaki, Francesca Verunelli, and Du Yun. The exquisitely detailed recordings of Density 2036 were made at the Meyer Sound Laboratories in Berkeley and produced by Matias Tarnopolsky over the course of four years, with no overdubbing or corrections, presenting Chase's incredible musicality in all its glory.

Claire Chase is a phenomenal artist.  I first came across her music in 2012 with the recording, Terrestre but I haven't listened to or even thought about her in a long time. 



So, thanks for bringing her latest project to my attention.  Density 2036 sounds like a very interesting thing to keep up with.

Offline T. D.

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Re: Avant garde flutes and reeds
« Reply #23 on: January 29, 2021, 05:20:36 PM »
More information (through 2020) and short video clips here:
http://www.clairechase.net/densityoverview
I wish I'd seen the live performances. The lineup of composers is impressive.
Article by Bruce Hodges (Brewski?) here: http://www.clairechase.net/density-2036-part-vi

Online Mandryka

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Re: Avant garde flutes and reeds
« Reply #24 on: May 15, 2021, 03:05:53 AM »
What happens if you play seven flutes at the same time? Fausto Romitelli has the answer

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/NF2hkK0bdwU&amp;t=521s&amp;ab_channel=MHL-Streaming" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/NF2hkK0bdwU&amp;t=521s&amp;ab_channel=MHL-Streaming</a>
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Online Mandryka

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Re: Avant garde flutes and reeds
« Reply #25 on: May 31, 2021, 12:19:22 AM »
<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/1SYTdp4Ql_c&amp;ab_channel=HansBalmer" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/1SYTdp4Ql_c&amp;ab_channel=HansBalmer</a>


Salvatore Sciarrino's Come vengono prodotti gli incantesimi?

Comments from Nicholas Hodges paper "A Volcano Viewed from Afar: The Music of Salvatore Sciarrino",  Tempo No. 194 (Cambridge 1995.)


Quote
The piece describes a curve which grows in density and solidity throughout, starting with  unblown key taps and becoming denser through, at first, the intensification of movement and widening of harmonic range, and then the intervention of blown notes, becoming more and more prominent in the texture. In 'Entretien avec Salvatore Sciarrino', in Entretemps No.9. (Paris 1991) Sciarrino mentions in connexion with this the tradition of final movements which represent a virtuosi  culmination - a tradition which can be traced through late Haydn and late Beethoven (a preoccupation of Sciarrino's) to Liszt - and many  others of his works bear an active, conscious relationship with this tradition. In the present case the piece confounds expectations of a final pyrotechnic display: it completely loses its confidence, and retreats into mournful tremolo warbles. There are a few brief attempts at a repeated intensification - which fail, leaving the piece to end unresolved.

This is an explicit formal reference, not for  reference's sake, but to make a point about perception. Sciarrino notes that 'in order to hold  the attention it is necessary always to escalate; and that is what the piece contradicts.'
« Last Edit: May 31, 2021, 02:11:14 AM by Mandryka »
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