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jotrofin95:
Hello Everyone!

I have been a technology specialist here on the West Coast for a couple of decades and love my work (at least much of the time ;)). But I also love to listen to good music – and to discuss it. I enjoy diverse genres including symphonic, opera, chamber and popular. A few of my many favorite composers are Rimsky-Korsakov, Khachaturian, Rachmaninov, Chopin, Bizet and Mascagni.

Recently I have had more time to explore other music because of the adverse effects of the covid virus on our business. I am particularly interested in learning more about 21st century music, something about which I am woefully ignorant. Although I have difficulty appreciating most of it, I am hoping that this will change with repeated exposure. Fortunately, I have found a few pieces that I like, an eclectic collection that includes works by Thomas Adès, Ann Cleare, John Corigliano (mainly his clarinet concerto https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DMzr58GbPmI), Paul Dupré (especially his piano pieces https://www.pauldupre.info/works.html), Arvo Pärt (mainly Fratres https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UTSsdcMBBCs) and Joseph Schwantner (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B_TgQCgo1yU). 

Being long immersed in a future-oriented technology field, I am naturally also interested in the future of music. I would hope to learn what participants of GMG think about the future. For example, will the trends of past decades continue? Will new forms of music emerge? New instruments? Do any of the above-mentioned living composers represent a new trend, and will any of their pieces enter the standard repertory?

Cheers!

david johnson:
Greetings to you, and welcome among us.  Currently, I do not think much of today's product will become 'classical standards'.

71 dB:
Welcome jotrofin95! I like Pärt, Schwantner and Corigliano (know only a few works for piano and violin).

Lately I have had this thought of the future of music: The music of the past was build on the principles of physical minimum phase systems (physical instruments/human voice) with certain limitations. Today and in the future music can be also build on the priciples of non-minimum phase systems and that opens doors to new music ideas and forms of expression as well as creates the need for new music theory. Also, artificial intelligent becomes an everyday tool in music creation and production.

k a rl h e nn i ng:

--- Quote from: jotrofin95 on December 13, 2020, 03:37:55 PM ---Hello Everyone!

I have been a technology specialist here on the West Coast for a couple of decades and love my work (at least much of the time ;)). But I also love to listen to good music – and to discuss it. I enjoy diverse genres including symphonic, opera, chamber and popular. A few of my many favorite composers are Rimsky-Korsakov, Khachaturian, Rachmaninov, Chopin, Bizet and Mascagni.

Recently I have had more time to explore other music because of the adverse effects of the covid virus on our business. I am particularly interested in learning more about 21st century music, something about which I am woefully ignorant. Although I have difficulty appreciating most of it, I am hoping that this will change with repeated exposure. Fortunately, I have found a few pieces that I like, an eclectic collection that includes works by Thomas Adès, Ann Cleare, John Corigliano (mainly his clarinet concerto https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DMzr58GbPmI), Paul Dupré (especially his piano pieces https://www.pauldupre.info/works.html), Arvo Pärt (mainly Fratres https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UTSsdcMBBCs) and Joseph Schwantner (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B_TgQCgo1yU). 

Being long immersed in a future-oriented technology field, I am naturally also interested in the future of music. I would hope to learn what participants of GMG think about the future. For example, will the trends of past decades continue? Will new forms of music emerge? New instruments? Do any of the above-mentioned living composers represent a new trend, and will any of their pieces enter the standard repertory?

Cheers!



--- End quote ---

Welcome! I'm a composer, and new music becoming "standard rep" is quite a challenge.

71 dB:

--- Quote from: k a rl h e nn i ng on December 14, 2020, 06:08:34 AM ---Welcome! I'm a composer, and new music becoming "standard rep" is quite a challenge.

--- End quote ---

It's always been a challenge. How many works by Dittersdorf or Ries ever became "standard rep" ? Only for a handful of "lucky" composers becoming "standard rep" was somewhat easy. How many living composers can expect to be new additions to this group of "standard rep" composer?

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