Author Topic: do YOU know what this mysterious score is from?  (Read 3662 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Scion7

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 2421
  • A vajda az én dolgom, és az üzlet jó.
  • Location: Borgó Pass
do YOU know what this mysterious score is from?
« on: December 15, 2020, 05:24:36 AM »


git out yer bestest instrument and play along
and see if you can guess ...
The Germans, who make doctrines out of everything, deal with music learnedly; the Italians, being voluptuous, seek in it lively, though fleeting, sensations; the French, more vain than perceptive, manage to speak of it wittily; and the English pay for it . . . - Stendhal

Offline Florestan

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 22342
  • Location: Bucharest, Romania
Re: do YOU know what this mysterious score is from?
« Reply #1 on: December 15, 2020, 11:37:52 AM »


git out yer bestest instrument and play along
and see if you can guess ...

That's Charles Robert of Anjou's Réminiscences de Posada, aka Basarab's Victory;D
« Last Edit: December 15, 2020, 11:40:45 AM by Florestan »
"Melody is the essence of music." - Mozart

"Believe nothing you hear, and only one-half that you see." - Edgar Allan Poe

Offline Madiel

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 10731
    • A musical diary
  • Location: Canberra, Australia
  • Currently Listening to:
    Whatever's listed in my blog.
Re: do YOU know what this mysterious score is from?
« Reply #2 on: December 16, 2020, 04:37:29 PM »
Visually I suspect a piano trio. *shrug*
I am now working on a discography of the works of Vagn Holmboe. Please visit and also contribute!

Offline Scion7

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 2421
  • A vajda az én dolgom, és az üzlet jó.
  • Location: Borgó Pass
Re: do YOU know what this mysterious score is from?
« Reply #3 on: December 20, 2020, 09:27:59 AM »
That's Charles Robert of Anjou's Réminiscences de Posada, aka Basarab's Victory;D

Oh, the humor of the Vlach!!!
That would be a one-note tune!!!!    :P
The Germans, who make doctrines out of everything, deal with music learnedly; the Italians, being voluptuous, seek in it lively, though fleeting, sensations; the French, more vain than perceptive, manage to speak of it wittily; and the English pay for it . . . - Stendhal