Author Topic: Avant garde music for that piece of furniture called a piano.  (Read 924 times)

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Offline Mandryka

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Re: Avant garde music for that piece of furniture called a piano.
« Reply #20 on: January 06, 2021, 11:20:26 AM »
Everyone knows that aporia is THE central concept in Beckett - I must go on, I can’t go on, I’ll go on, as the unnamed in  The Unnamable says. This aporia was a strong influence on the music of Bill Hopkins, a Barraqué student who died young leaving very few works, Evans’s Etudes were released by Nicolas Hodges last year. These piano pieces are supposed to be the musical embodiment of the fragility of aporia,  every time they appear to be doing something, getting somewhere, making a point, they break off, they fail. A faltering life force, Hodges calls it.



Three books, cahiers for some reason, some rather substantial. The Etudes in the recording are each given a word and together they make a sentence

One may know grief in her white involute portal.

What are we to make of that I wonder. Maybe someone who has the booklet can help cast some light on this mystery. Hodges article on Hopkins, which you can find on Jstor, doesn't seem to make it clear (unless I missed it, I've only skimmed.)
« Last Edit: January 06, 2021, 11:36:12 AM by Mandryka »
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Offline T. D.

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Re: Avant garde music for that piece of furniture called a piano.
« Reply #21 on: January 06, 2021, 02:22:31 PM »
Everyone knows that aporia is THE central concept in Beckett - I must go on, I can’t go on, I’ll go on, as the unnamed in  The Unnamable says. This aporia was a strong influence on the music of Bill Hopkins, a Barraqué student who died young leaving very few works, Evans’s Etudes were released by Nicolas Hodges last year. These piano pieces are supposed to be the musical embodiment of the fragility of aporia,  every time they appear to be doing something, getting somewhere, making a point, they break off, they fail. A faltering life force, Hodges calls it.



Three books, cahiers for some reason, some rather substantial. The Etudes in the recording are each given a word and together they make a sentence

One may know grief in her white involute portal.

What are we to make of that I wonder. Maybe someone who has the booklet can help cast some light on this mystery. Hodges article on Hopkins, which you can find on Jstor, doesn't seem to make it clear (unless I missed it, I've only skimmed.)

I bought this recording not long after release, very early this millennium IIRC, didn't like it but still own it. Sorry, but don't have the patience to wade through that gobbledygook right now (such writing helped turn me away from new music).
I can send you scans if you PM me with delivery instructions.

The point seems to be that, if a performer wants to perform a selection of etudes, she must choose a set whose key words form a syntactically meaningful statement. Further, "...III:VI:VIII constitutes a species of sonata; but only the full cycle (I-IX, or perhaps V-IX...I-IV) can correspond to the composer's special and complete vision of the collection as a single work".

« Last Edit: January 07, 2021, 06:00:40 AM by T. D. »

Offline T. D.

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Re: Avant garde music for that piece of furniture called a piano.
« Reply #22 on: January 06, 2021, 03:45:42 PM »
Here's a partial scan; hope it's intelligible...

Offline Mandryka

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Re: Avant garde music for that piece of furniture called a piano.
« Reply #23 on: January 07, 2021, 01:40:45 AM »
Thanks, it is indeed intelligible.

I’m taking a break this morning from the cutting edge and going back to old skool Berio - very charming six encores here played in predictably “piano beautiful “ way by Lucchesini 



And then to Franco Evangelisti’s Proiezioni Sonore as an antidote. 
« Last Edit: January 07, 2021, 01:47:10 AM by Mandryka »
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Offline Mandryka

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Re: Avant garde music for that piece of furniture called a piano.
« Reply #24 on: January 07, 2021, 03:35:04 AM »
Not really avant garde, but gorgeous I think, and rare -- Hans van Sweeden's Drei Nachtstücke

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/lbes5tnL90Y&amp;ab_channel=miclu2011" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/lbes5tnL90Y&amp;ab_channel=miclu2011</a>

And no less rare, Henri Pousseur's variations,  Apostrophe et six réflexions

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/nL6i6NNVYxo&amp;ab_channel=MarcelCominotto" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/nL6i6NNVYxo&amp;ab_channel=MarcelCominotto</a>
« Last Edit: January 07, 2021, 03:39:19 AM by Mandryka »
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Offline Mandryka

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Re: Avant garde music for that piece of furniture called a piano.
« Reply #25 on: January 07, 2021, 03:58:18 AM »
And another mid century modern, as they say on ebay, and this is another rare gorgeous one, Gennady Banshchikov's Piano Sonata no.3. This is a bit special. Spacious music.

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/YJzfCCRkRGM&amp;ab_channel=hu" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/YJzfCCRkRGM&amp;ab_channel=hu</a>
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Offline T. D.

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Re: Avant garde music for that piece of furniture called a piano.
« Reply #26 on: January 07, 2021, 06:08:58 AM »
Thanks, it is indeed intelligible.
...

Good.
Your post (Bill Hopkins solo piano perf. Nic Hodges) brought back some sad memories. Going back to the days when I was active on rec.music.classical.contemporary (and r.m.c.r.), I believe Nic Hodges mailed me (from overseas!) a free copy of the recording. Super generous, I was extremely grateful. But the music just wasn't to my taste. And not attributable to serialism; I love Barraqué's Piano Sonata, for instance.

Interesting aside: the first piece on the disc, Sous-Structures, was dedicated to Hopkins's teacher Edmund Rubbra.

Offline Mandryka

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Re: Avant garde music for that piece of furniture called a piano.
« Reply #27 on: January 07, 2021, 08:52:25 AM »
Good.
Your post (Bill Hopkins solo piano perf. Nic Hodges) brought back some sad memories. Going back to the days when I was active on rec.music.classical.contemporary (and r.m.c.r.), I believe Nic Hodges mailed me (from overseas!) a free copy of the recording. Super generous, I was extremely grateful. But the music just wasn't to my taste. And not attributable to serialism; I love Barraqué's Piano Sonata, for instance.

Interesting aside: the first piece on the disc, Sous-Structures, was dedicated to Hopkins's teacher Edmund Rubbra.

I'll be interested to know what you make of  Manoury's second sonata that I posted. I think it's probably rather good, not experimental enough for my tastes, but in truth I find the piano sound on youtube starts to wear after about 15 minutes so a long sonata wears out its welcome.



Apparently Hopkins studied with Barraque obviously, Rubra as you say, but also Nono.

Generally I'm not as keen on Nick Hodges as you are, though I certainly prefer him to Ian Pace (but I prefer anyone to Ian Pace!) You know he's just released a Beethoven/Birtwistle CD?

One thing I do think is that all piano music, experimental or not, needs colour and tone. For this reason I'm appreciating Sabine Liebner more and more, despite some quirky interpretation decisions in a rather limited repertoire.
« Last Edit: January 08, 2021, 01:33:02 AM by Mandryka »
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Offline Mandryka

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Re: Avant garde music for that piece of furniture called a piano.
« Reply #28 on: January 07, 2021, 09:11:02 AM »
Oh, I didn't post the Manoury! Here

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/OOg_jIn6S9Y" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/OOg_jIn6S9Y</a>
« Last Edit: January 08, 2021, 01:32:40 AM by Mandryka »
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Offline T. D.

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Re: Avant garde music for that piece of furniture called a piano.
« Reply #29 on: January 07, 2021, 09:17:15 AM »
I'll be interested to know what you make of  Manoury's first sonata that I posted. I think it's probably rather good, not experimental enough for my tastes, but in truth I find the piano sound on youtube starts to wear after about 15 minutes so a long sonata wears out its welcome.



Apparently Hopkins studied with Barraque obviously, Rubra as you say, but also Nono.

Generally I'm not as keen on Nick Hodges as you are, though I certainly prefer him to Ian Pace (but I prefer anyone to Ian Pace!) You know he's just released a Beethoven/Birtwistle CD?

One thing I do think is that all piano music, experimental or not, needs colour and tone. For this reason I'm appreciating Sabine Liebner more and more, despite some quirky interpretation decisions in a rather limited repertoire.

Thanks. This is my busiest season at work, won't be able to listen carefully for a little while.
I regret saying this, but though I enjoyed online discussions with Nic H., I have not liked his recordings I've heard to date, though it may be repertoire rather than performance related. I know of the recent B / B, don't want to purchase but will look for clips.
Agreed on Ian Pace, prolific (online at least) writer but I wrote him off as a performer after a couple of listens.
Not to stress the negative, but Joanna Macgregor is my pianistic bête noire; I violently disliked what I heard of her contemporary repertoire, can't speak of her standard repertoire performances but have no desire to listen.
Will have to explore Liebner, she seems to record mostly on Wergo which is not a convenient (i.e. inexpensive) label for me.

[Added] On a first/distracted Youtube listen, the Manoury sonata is impressive. Further listening slated.
« Last Edit: January 08, 2021, 09:33:03 AM by T. D. »

Offline Mandryka

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Re: Avant garde music for that piece of furniture called a piano.
« Reply #30 on: January 10, 2021, 03:45:47 AM »
Now here's a homage to Beethoven, Daniel Moreira's Ludvan ven Beethowig first on two toy pianos

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/Zvz0FZDzddU&amp;ab_channel=DanielMoreira" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/Zvz0FZDzddU&amp;ab_channel=DanielMoreira</a>

And a version for a piece of furniture (less interesting, obvs.)

https://soundcloud.com/daniel_moreira_composer/complete-track-rhythmic-study
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Offline Mandryka

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Re: Avant garde music for that piece of furniture called a piano.
« Reply #31 on: January 11, 2021, 01:13:07 PM »


Stefan Prins's Etude Interieure is for piano. Inside of a piano, the piano is basically used as a resonator, marbles used to attack the strings inside, keys are not used at all  - hence interieure. And marbles. Really nice on the above CD which is streaming everywhere. But unfortunately no video of a performance that I can find -- which is a shame because I'm sure it would be bizarre and fun to watch those marbles roll.
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Offline Mandryka

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Re: Avant garde music for that piece of furniture called a piano.
« Reply #32 on: January 15, 2021, 10:36:02 AM »
Thanks. This is my busiest season at work, won't be able to listen carefully for a little while.
I regret saying this, but though I enjoyed online discussions with Nic H., I have not liked his recordings I've heard to date, though it may be repertoire rather than performance related. I know of the recent B / B, don't want to purchase but will look for clips.
Agreed on Ian Pace, prolific (online at least) writer but I wrote him off as a performer after a couple of listens.
Not to stress the negative, but Joanna Macgregor is my pianistic bête noire; I violently disliked what I heard of her contemporary repertoire, can't speak of her standard repertoire performances but have no desire to listen.
Will have to explore Liebner, she seems to record mostly on Wergo which is not a convenient (i.e. inexpensive) label for me.

[Added] On a first/distracted Youtube listen, the Manoury sonata is impressive. Further listening slated.

I just found myself enjoying quite a long solo piano piece on this, Folklore II



And I said to myself that maybe I’d been unfair about Pace. But no, Finnissy’s playing. It’s worth catching when you’re in the mood for that sort of thing. It’s such a shame that Finnissy didn’t play any of The History of Photography.
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